Jing (philosophy)

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Jing (Chinese :; pinyin :Jìng) is a concept in Chinese philosophy which is typically translated as "reverence." It is often used by Confucius in the term gōngjìng (Chinese :恭敬), meaning "respectful reverence". The Confucian notion of respect has been likened to the later, western Kantian notion. [1] For Confucians, jìng requires , or righteousness, and a proper observation of rituals ( ). To have jìng is vitally important in the maintenance of xiào , or filial piety. [2] [3]

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References

  1. Dillon, Robin S., "Respect", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Fall 2010 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = <http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/fall2010/entries/respect/>
  2. Richey, J. (2005). Confucius, in Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. URL = <http://www.iep.utm.edu/confuciu/>
  3. Confucius. (1997). The Analects of Confucius. Chichung Huang, Trans. Oxford University Press: Oxford, p. 30-31