Joan I, Countess of Auvergne

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Joan I of Auvergne
Jan jana.jpg
Coronation of King John and Queen Joan
Countess of Auvergne and Boulogne
Reign1332–1360
Predecessor William XII of Auvergne
Successor Philip of Rouves
Queen consort of France
Tenure1350–1360
Born8 May 1326
Died29 September 1360(1360-09-29) (aged 34)
Spouse Philip of Burgundy
John II of France
Issue
among others...
Philip I, Duke of Burgundy
House Auvergne
Father William XII, Count of Auvergne
MotherMarguerite d'Évreux
Religion Roman Catholicism

Joan I of Auvergne (8 May 1326 – 29 September 1360, Chateau d'Argilly) was ruling Countess of Auvergne and Boulogne in 1332–1360, and Queen of France by her marriage to King John II.

Vadans, Jura Commune in Bourgogne-Franche-Comté, France

Vadans is a commune in the Jura department in the Bourgogne-Franche-Comté region in eastern France.

John II of France King of France

John II, called John the Good, was King of France from 1350 until his death.

Contents

Life

She was the daughter of William XII, Count of Auvergne and Boulogne, by his wife, Margaret, a sister of Philip III of Navarre. She inherited the counties of Auvergne and Boulogne after the death of her father.

Philip III of Navarre King of Navarre

Philip III, called the Noble or the Wise, was King of Navarre from 1328 until his death. He was born a minor member of the French royal family but gained prominence when the Capetian main line went extinct, as he and his wife and cousin, Joan II of Navarre, acquired the Iberian kingdom and a number of French fiefs.

Count of Boulogne

The Count of Boulogne was a historical title in the Kingdom of France. The city of Boulogne-sur-Mer became the centre of the county of Boulogne during the ninth century. Little is known of the early counts, but the first holder of the title is recorded in the 11th century.

Her first husband was Philip of Burgundy, who held the title Count of Auvergne by virtue of their marriage. They had one surviving child, Philip, who would be for much of his brief life Duke of Burgundy (by inheriting the title from his grandfather).

Philip I, Duke of Burgundy Duke of Burgundy

Philip of Rouvres was the Count of Burgundy and Count of Artois from 1347, Duke of Burgundy from 1349, and Count of Auvergne and Boulogne from 1360. He was the only son of Philip, heir to the Duchy of Burgundy, and Joan I, heiress of Auvergne and Boulogne.

Duke of Burgundy was a title used by the rulers of the Duchy of Burgundy, from its establishmemt in 843 to its annexation by France in 1477, and later by Habsburg sovereigns of the Burgundian Low Countries (1478-1556).

Following the death of her husband, Joan married John II of France on 13 February 1350; she became Queen consort of France in the following year. This was a second marriage for them both, John's first wife, Bonne of Bohemia, had died of Black Death and had left John with eight children, so there was little pressure for Joan to give birth to a son and heir. Joan's son, Philip became a ward of the King. She had three children with King John, two girls and an unnamed son, all of whom died young. Joan died in 1360. Her possessions were inherited by her son.

Black Death Pandemic in Eurasia in the 1300s

The Black Death, also known as the Pest, the Great Plague or the Plague, or less commonly the Black Plague, was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated 75 to 200 million people in Eurasia and peaking in Europe from 1347 to 1351. The bacterium Yersinia pestis, which results in several forms of plague, is believed to have been the cause. The Black Death was the first major European outbreak of plague, and the second plague pandemic. The plague created a number of religious, social and economic upheavals which had profound effects on the course of European history.

Issue

By her first husband, Philip, Joan had the following issue:

Amadeus VI, Count of Savoy Count of Savoy 1343-1383

Amadeus VI, nicknamed the Green Count was Count of Savoy from 1343 to 1383. He was the eldest son of Aymon, Count of Savoy and Yolande Palaeologo of Montferrat. Though he started under a regency, he showed himself to be a forceful leader, continuing Savoy's emergence as a power in Europe politically and militarily. He participated in a crusade against the Turks who were moving into Europe.

Margaret III, Countess of Flanders Countess suo jure of Flanders

Margaret III was the last Countess of Flanders of the House of Dampierre, as well as Countess of Artois and Countess of Burgundy. She was the only surviving child and heir of Louis II, Count of Flanders (1346–1384) and Margaret of Brabant.

By her second husband, John, Joan had the following issue:

Ancestors

Notes

Related Research Articles

The count of Flanders was the ruler or sub-ruler of the county of Flanders, beginning in the 9th century. The title was held for a time by the rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Spain. During the French Revolution in 1790, the county of Flanders was annexed to France and ceased to exist. In the 19th century, the title was appropriated by Belgium and granted twice to younger sons of Belgian kings. The most recent holder died in 1983.

Duchy of Burgundy historic principality

The Duchy of Burgundy emerged in the 9th century as one of the successors of the ancient Kingdom of the Burgundians, which after its conquest in 532 had formed a constituent part of the Frankish Empire. Upon the 9th-century partitions, the French remnants of the Burgundian kingdom were reduced to a ducal rank by King Robert II of France in 1004. Robert II's son and heir, King Henry I of France, inherited the duchy but ceded it to his younger brother Robert in 1032. Other portions had passed to the Imperial Kingdom of Arles and the County of Burgundy (Franche-Comté).

Philip I, Count of Auvergne Count of Auvergne and Boulogne,heir of Duchy of Burgundy

Philip of Burgundy was Count of Auvergne and Boulogne in right of his wife and was the only son and heir of Odo IV, Duke of Burgundy, and of Joan III, Countess of Burgundy. His mother was the daughter of King Philip V of France and of Joan II, Countess of Burgundy.

Anthony, Duke of Brabant Dutch noble

Anthony, Duke of Brabant, also known as Antoine de Brabant, Antoine de Bourgogne and Anthony of Burgundy, was Count of Rethel (1402–1406), Duke of Brabant, Lothier and Limburg (1406–1415), and Co-Duke of Luxemburg (1411-1415).

The County of Boulogne was a county within the Kingdom of France during the 9th to 15th centuries, centred on the city of Boulogne-sur-Mer. It was ruled by the counts of Flandres in the 10th century, but a separate House of Boulogne emerges in the 11th. It was annexed by Philip II of France in 1212 and after this was treated as part of the county of Artois, until it was finally annexed into the royal domain in 1550.

Bonne of Luxembourg Duchess of Normandy

Bonne of Luxemburg or Jutta of Luxemburg, was born Jutta (Judith), the second daughter of John the Blind, king of Bohemia, and his first wife, Elisabeth of Bohemia. She was the first wife of King John II of France; however, as she died a year prior to his accession, she was never a French queen. Jutta was referred to in French historiography as Bonne de Luxembourg. She was a member of the House of Luxembourg. Among her children were Charles V of France, Philip II, Duke of Burgundy, and Joan, Queen of Navarre.

Louis II, Count of Flanders Count of Flanders, Nevers and Rethel

Louis II of Flanders, also known as Louis of Male, a member of the House of Dampierre, was Count of Flanders, Nevers and Rethel from 1346 as well as Count of Artois and Burgundy from 1382 until his death.

Adelaide, Countess of Burgundy Countess suo jure of Burgundy

Adelaide of Merania was Countess of Burgundy from 1248 until her death. She was also Countess of Savoy and Bresse through her marriage in 1267 to Philip I, Count of Savoy.

Margaret I, Countess of Burgundy Countess Palatine of Burgundy

Margaret I, was a ruling Countess Palatine of Burgundy and Artois from 1361 and 1382. She was also countess of Flanders, Nevers and Rethel by marriage to Louis I, Count of Flanders, and regent of Flanders during the minority of her son Louis II, Count of Flanders in 1346.

Joan II, Countess of Burgundy Countess of Burgundy

Joan II, Countess of Burgundy, was Queen of France by marriage to Philip V of France, and ruling Countess of Burgundy and Countess of Artois. She was the eldest daughter and heiress of Otto IV, Count of Burgundy, and Mahaut, Countess of Artois.

Joan II, Countess of Auvergne 15th-century French countess

Joan II, Countess of Auvergne and Boulogne, also known as Jeanne de Boulogne, and Joan, Duchess of Berry,, was Sovereign Countess of Auvergne and Boulogne from 1394 until 1424. She was the daughter of John II of Auvergne, and second wife of John, Duke of Berry. She is arguably most famous for saving the life of her nephew, King Charles VI of France, during the disastrous Bal des Ardents.

Margaret of Bavaria Duchess consort of Burgundy

Margaret of Bavaria,, was Duchess of Burgundy by marriage to John the Fearless, Duke of Burgundy. She was the regent of the Burgundian Low countries during the absence of her spouse in 1404–1419 and the regent in French Burgundy during the absence of her son in 1419–1423. She became most known for her successful defense of French Burgundy against John IV, Count of Armagnac in 1419.

Margaret of Savoy, Countess of Saint-Pol Margravine of Montferrat

Margaret of Savoy, also known as Marguerite de Savoie or Margherita di Savoia, was the eldest surviving daughter of Louis I, Duke of Savoy. She was the wife of Margrave John IV of Montferrat, and later the wife of Peter II of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, Marle, and Soissons. Margaret's numerous descendants included Mary, Queen of Scots and King Henry IV of France.

Margaret of Artois eldest child of Philip of Artois and his wife, Blanche of Brittany

Margaret of Artois (1285–1311) was the eldest child of Philip of Artois and his wife, Blanche of Brittany. She was a member of the House of Artois. She was married to Louis d'Évreux. By her marriage, Margaret was Countess consort of Évreux.

Marie I of Auvergne was suo jureCountess of Auvergne and Countess of Boulogne from 1424 to her death in 1437, having inherited the titles from her cousin Joan II, Countess of Auvergne. She was also styled Dame of Montgascon. She was the wife of Bertrand IV de La Tour, and the mother of Bertrand V de La Tour who succeeded her as Count of Auvergne and Boulogne.

Margaret of Savoy, Duchess of Anjou Duchess of Anjou and Calabria

Margaret of Savoy, was a daughter of Amadeus VIII of Savoy and Mary of Burgundy. By her three illustrious marriages, she held a number of titles, including Duchess of Anjou, Duchess of Calabria, Countess of Maine, Countess of the Palatinate, and Countess of Württemberg.

References

The Library of Congress Control Number (LCCN) is a serially-based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress Classification.

French nobility
Preceded by
William XII of Auvergne
Count of Auvergne
Count of Boulogne

1332–1360
With: Philip II of Boulogne
John II of France
Succeeded by
Philip III of Boulogne
French royalty
Preceded by
Blanche of Navarre
Queen consort of France
22 August 1350 – 29 September 1360
Succeeded by
Joanna of Bourbon