Joan II, Countess of Burgundy

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Joan II
Jeanne II, Countess of Burgundy, Queen of France and Navarre.jpg
Countess of Burgundy
Reign1315–1330
Predecessor Robert
Successor Joan III
Countess of Artois
Reign1329–1330
Predecessor Matilda
Successor Joan III
Queen consort of France and Navarre
Reign1316–1322
Born15 January 1292
Died21 January 1330(1330-01-21) (aged 38)
Roye-en-Artois
Burial
Spouse Philip V of France
Issue Joan III, Countess of Burgundy
Margaret I, Countess of Burgundy
Isabelle, Dauphine of Viennois
Blanche of France
House Ivrea
Father Otto IV, Count of Burgundy
Mother Mahaut, Countess of Artois
Religion Roman Catholicism

Joan II, Countess of Burgundy (French : Jeanne; 15 January 1292[ citation needed ] – 21 January 1330), was Queen of France by marriage to Philip V of France, and ruling Countess of Burgundy and Countess of Artois. She was the eldest daughter and heiress of Otto IV, Count of Burgundy, and Mahaut, Countess of Artois.

Contents

Biography

Coat of arms of Joan II. Coat of Arms of Joan II and Blanche of Burgundy as Queens Consort of Navarre.svg
Coat of arms of Joan II.

In the beginning of 1314, Joan's sister Blanche and her sister-in-law Margaret were convicted of adultery with two knights, upon the testimony of their sister-in-law Isabella, in the Tour de Nesle Affair. Joan was thought to have known of the affairs, and was placed under house arrest at Dourdan as punishment. She continued to protest her innocence, as did her husband, who had refused to repudiate her, and by 1315 – through the influence of her mother and husband – her name had been cleared by the Paris Parlement, and she was allowed to return to court.

Queen

With the death of King John I of France, her husband became King Philip V of France; Joan became queen consort. She was crowned with her husband at Reims on 9 January 1317.

Countess of Burgundy and Artois

Her father, the Count of Burgundy, died in 1302, and his titles were inherited by his only legitimate son, Robert. Upon Robert's death in 1315, the County of Burgundy was inherited by Joan. In 1329, she inherited her mother's County of Artois.

After her husband's death, Joan lived in her own domains. The death of her spouse dealt her a devastating blow from which she never recovered, sinking into a deep depression for the rest of her life. After her beloved sister died in 1326, she was said to be "so sorrowful as never before she had been."

Death

She died at Roye-en-Artois, on 21 January 1330, and was buried in Saint-Denis beside her husband. Her titles were inherited by her eldest daughter, Joan III, who had married Odo IV, Duke of Burgundy, in 1318. With Joan II's death, the County and Duchy of Burgundy became united through this marriage. The Counties of Burgundy and Artois were eventually inherited by her younger daughter Margaret in 1361.

Joan left provision in her will for the founding of a college in Paris; it was named Collège de Bourgogne, "Burgundy College."

Issue

The seal of Joan II Seal of Joan II, Countess of Burgundy.jpg
The seal of Joan II

With Philip V of France:

  1. Joan (1/2 May 1308 – 10/15 August 1349), Countess of Burgundy and Artois in her own right and wife of Odo IV, Duke of Burgundy
  2. Margaret (1309 – 9 May 1382), wife of Louis I of Flanders. Countess of Burgundy and Artois in her own right.
  3. Isabelle (1310 – April 1348), wife of Guigues VIII de La Tour du Pin, Dauphin de Viennois.
  4. Blanche (1313 – 26 April 1358), a nun.
  5. Philip (24 June 1316 – 24 February 1317).

In fiction

Joan (as Jeanne) is a character in Les Rois maudits (The Accursed Kings), a series of French historical novels by Maurice Druon. She was portrayed by Catherine Rich  [ fr ] in the 1972 French miniseries adaptation of the series, and by Julie Depardieu in the 2005 adaptation. [1] [2]

Ancestry

See also

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Tour de Nesle affair

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References

  1. "Official website: Les Rois maudits (2005 miniseries)" (in French). 2005. Archived from the original on 15 August 2009. Retrieved 25 July 2015.
  2. "Les Rois maudits: Casting de la saison 1" (in French). AlloCiné. 2005. Archived from the original on 19 December 2014. Retrieved 25 July 2015.
Joan II, Countess of Burgundy
Born: 1292 Died: 1330
French nobility
Preceded by
Robert
Countess Palatine of Burgundy
1315–1330
With: Philip II (1315–1322)
Succeeded by
Joan III
Preceded by
Matilda
Countess of Artois
1329–1330
French royalty
Preceded by
Clementia of Hungary
Queen consort of France and Navarre
1316–1322
Succeeded by
Blanche of Burgundy