Joan of Valois, Queen of Navarre

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Joan of Valois
Joan of Valois, Queen of Navarre1.jpg
Queen consort of Navarre
Tenure1352-1373
Born(1343-06-24)24 June 1343
Châteauneuf-sur-Loire
Died3 November 1373(1373-11-03) (aged 30)
Évreux
Burial
Spouse Charles II of Navarre
Issue
among others...
Charles III of Navarre
Joanna, Queen of England
Alexandra Queen of France
House Valois
Father John II of France
Mother Bonne of Luxembourg
Religion Roman Catholicism

Joan of France, also known as Joan or Joanna of Valois (24 June 1343, Châteauneuf-sur-Loire 3 November 1373, Évreux), was the daughter of John II of France (called The Good), and his first wife, Bonne of Luxembourg. She married Charles II of Navarre (called The Bad), and became Queen-consort of Navarre.

Contents

Marriage

She was first betrothed to John of Brabant, son of John III, Duke of Brabant and his wife Marie d'Évreux. The marriage did not, however, take place. [1]

Joan instead was married on 12 February 1352 to Charles the Bad, at Chateau du Vivier, close to Fontenay-Trésigny in Brie, Coutevroult. He was the son of Philip III of Navarre and his wife, Joan II of Navarre. Joan and Charles were agnatic third cousins and cognatic second cousins.

Joan and Charles had seven children:

  1. Marie (1360, Puente la Reina aft. 1400), married in Tudela on 20 January 1393 Alfonso d'Aragona, Duke of Gandia (d. 1412). Their marriage was childless.
  2. Charles III of Navarre (13611425), married Eleanor of Castile (d. 1416), by whom he had issue.
  3. Bonne (1364 aft. 1389)
  4. Peter of Navarre, Count of Mortain (c. 31 March 1366, Évreux 29 July 1412, Nevers), [2] married in Alençon on 21 April 1411 Catherine (13801462), daughter of Peter II of Alençon. Their marriage was childless.
  5. Philip (b. 1368), d. young
  6. Joanna of Navarre (13701437), first married John IV, Duke of Brittany by whom she had issue; and later Henry IV of England. Her second marriage was childless.
  7. Blanca (13721385, Olite)

Joan's daughter, Joanna of Navarre was the second wife of Henry IV of England.

Joan died in 1373, aged thirty, in Évreux. She was buried in the Royal Abbey of Saint Denis.

Ancestors

Related Research Articles

Joan of Navarre, Queen of England 14th and 15th-century French noblewoman and queen of England

Joan of Navarre, also known as Joanna was Duchess of Brittany by marriage to Duke John IV, and later Queen of England by marriage to King Henry IV. She served as regent of Brittany from 1399 until 1403 during the minority of her son. She also served as regent of England during the absence of her stepson, Henry V, in 1415. Four years later he imprisoned her and confiscated her money and land. Joan was released in 1422, shortly before Henry V's death.

Charles II of Navarre King of Navarre

Charles II, called Charles the Bad, was King of Navarre 1349–1387 and Count of Évreux 1343–1387.

Charles III of Navarre King of Navarre

Charles III, called the Noble, was King of Navarre from 1387 to his death and Count of Évreux from 1387 to 1404, when he exchanged it for the title Duke of Nemours. He spent his reign improving the infrastructure of his kingdom, restoring Navarre's pride after the dismal reign of his father, Charles the Bad, and mending strained relations with France.

John IV, Duke of Brittany Duke of Brittany

John IV the Conqueror KG was Duke of Brittany and Count of Montfort from 1345 until his death and 7th Earl of Richmond from 1372 until his death.

Bonne of Luxembourg Duchess of Normandy

Bonne of Luxemburg or Jutta of Luxemburg, was born Jutta (Judith), the second daughter of John the Blind, king of Bohemia, and his first wife, Elisabeth of Bohemia. She was the first wife of King John II of France; however, as she died a year prior to his accession, she was never a French queen. Jutta was referred to in French historiography as Bonne de Luxembourg. She was a member of the House of Luxembourg. Among her children were Charles V of France, Philip II, Duke of Burgundy, and Joan, Queen of Navarre.

Joan II of Navarre Queen of Navarre

Joan II was Queen of Navarre from 1328 until her death. She was the only surviving child of Louis X of France, King of France and Navarre, and Margaret of Burgundy. Joan's paternity was dubious because her mother was involved in a scandal, but Louis X declared her his legitimate daughter before he died in 1316. However, the French lords were opposed to the idea of a female monarch and elected Louis X's brother, Philip V, king. The Navarrese noblemen also paid homage to Philip. Joan's maternal grandmother, Agnes of France, Duchess of Burgundy, and uncle, Odo IV of Burgundy, made attempts to secure the counties of Champagne and Brie to Joan, but the French royal troops defeated her supporters. After Philip V married his daughter to Odo and granted him two counties as her dowry, Odo renounced Joan's claim to Champagne and Brie in exchange for a compensation in March 1318. Joan married Philip of Évreux, who was also a member of the French royal family.

Philip III of Navarre King of Navarre

Philip III, called the Noble or the Wise, was King of Navarre from 1328 until his death. He was born a minor member of the French royal family but gained prominence when the Capetian main line went extinct, as he and his wife and cousin, Joan II of Navarre, acquired the Iberian kingdom and a number of French fiefs.

Peter II, Count of Alençon Count of Alençon and Perche

Peter II of Alençon, called the Noble, was the son of Charles II of Alençon and Maria de la Cerda. He was Count of Alençon from 1361 until his death in 1404 and Count of Perche from 1377 until his death in 1404.

Louis, Count of Évreux Count of Évreux

Louis of Évreux was a prince, the only son of King Philip III of France and his second wife Maria of Brabant, and thus a half-brother of King Philip IV of France.

Eleanor of Castile, Queen of Navarre Queen consort of Navarre

Eleanor of Castile was an infanta of Castile and the Queen consort of Navarre.

The County of Fézensac was an 8th-century creation on the north-eastern fringes of the Duchy of Gascony following Charlemagne's policy of feudalisation and Frankish colonisation. The move was aimed at offsetting and undermining the authority of the duke of Gascony Lupo II after the setback suffered by the Franks at the Battle of Roncevaux in 778 and failure to restrain the Basques. That advance clearly displeased the Basques, with these policies sparking a stir on the banks of the Garonne.

John IV was a Count of Armagnac, Fézensac, and Rodez from 1418 to 1450. He was the son of Bernard VII of Armagnac, Count d' Armagnac, of Fézensac, Pardiac, and Rodez; and Bonne of Berry. John IV was involved in the intrigues related to the Hundred Years' War and in conflicts against the King of France.

Marie d'Alençon was a French noblewoman, a Princess of the Blood, and the wife of John VII of Harcourt, Count of Harcourt and of Aumale, Viscount of Châtellerault, Baron of Elbeuf, of Mézières, of Lillebone, of La Saussaye.

Anne of Armagnac

Anne of Armagnac, Dame d'Albret, Countess of Dreux was a French noblewoman and a member of the powerful Gascon Armagnac family which played a prominent role in French politics during the Hundred Years War and were the principal adversaries of the Burgundians throughout the Armagnac-Burgundian Civil War. Anne was the wife of Charles II d'Albret. One of her illustrious descendants was Queen Jeanne III of Navarre, mother of King Henry IV, the first Bourbon king of France.

Margaret of Artois eldest child of Philip of Artois and his wife, Blanche of Brittany

Margaret of Artois (1285–1311) was the eldest child of Philip of Artois and his wife, Blanche of Brittany. She was a member of the House of Artois. She was married to Louis d'Évreux. By her marriage, Margaret was Countess consort of Évreux.

Isabella of Navarre was the younger surviving daughter of Charles III of Navarre and his wife Eleanor of Castile. She was a member of the House of Évreux.

Beatrice of Navarre (1392-1412/1415) was a daughter of Charles III of Navarre and his wife, Eleanor of Castile.

Marie d'Évreux was the eldest child of Louis d'Évreux and his wife Margaret of Artois. She was a member of the House of Capet.

Maria de la Cerda y de Lara Countess of Étampes

Maria de la Cerda y de Lara was the youngest daughter of Fernando de la Cerda and his wife Juana Núñez de Lara. Maria was a member of the Castilian House of Burgundy. By her second marriage she was Countess of Alençon.

References

  1. Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, CAPET
  2. "Pierre de Navarre, comte de Mortain". Corpus (École nationale des chartes). Testaments enregistrés au Parlement de Paris sous le règne de Charles VI (in French). Sorbonne . Retrieved 2018-03-09.
Joan of Valois, Queen of Navarre
Born: 24 June 1343 Died: 3 November 1373
Preceded by
Jeanne d'Évreux
Queen consort of Navarre
1352–1373
Succeeded by
Eleanor of Castile