Joe Reed II

Last updated
Joe Reed II
Breed Quarter Horse
Discipline Racing
Sire Joe Reed P-3
GrandsireJoe Blair (TB)
DamNellene
Maternal grandsireFleeting Time (TB)
Sex Stallion
Foaled1936
Died1964
CountryUnited States
Color Chestnut
BreederJ. W. House
Awards
  • 1942 Champion Quarter Running Stallion
  • AA speed rating speed rating
Honors
American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame

Joe Reed II (1936–1964) was a Quarter Horse racehorse from the early days of the American Quarter Horse Association (or AQHA) that became an influential sire with the breed.

American Quarter Horse American horse breed

The American Quarter Horse, or Quarter Horse, is an American breed of horse that excels at sprinting short distances. Its name came from its ability to outdistance other horse breeds in races of a quarter mile or less; some have been clocked at speeds up to 55 mph (88.5 km/h). The Quarter Horse breed began when colonists in the 1600s on the Eastern seaboard of what today is the United States began to breed imported English Thoroughbred horses with assorted "native" horses. This included the Chickasaw horse, which was a breed developed by Native American people from horses descended from Spain, developed from Iberian, Arabian and Barb stock brought to what is now the Southeastern United States by the Conquistadors.. The American Quarter Horse is the most popular breed in the United States today, and the American Quarter Horse Association is the largest breed registry in the world, with almost 3 million living American Quarter Horses registered in 2014.

American Quarter Horse Association American horse breed registry for Quarter Horses

The American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA), based in Amarillo, Texas, is an international organization dedicated to the preservation, improvement and record-keeping of the American Quarter Horse. The association sanctions many competitive events and maintains the official registry. The organization also houses the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame and Museum and sponsors educational programs. The organization was founded in 1940 in Fort Worth, Texas and now has nearly 234,627 members, over 32,000 of which are international.

Contents

Life

Joe Reed II was registered number 985 in the AQHA's stud book. He was registered as a chestnut stallion that foaled in 1936. His breeder was recorded as J. W. House of Cameron, Texas, and his owner when he was registered was Bert H. Wood of Tucson, Arizona. [1] He was the son of Joe Reed P-3 and Nellene, a daughter of Fleeting Time (TB). [2] He was over half Thoroughbred by breeding, as both his sire and his dam were by Thoroughbreds. On his dam's side he traced twice to Traveler. [3] His paternal granddam, Della Moore, was a Louisiana bred mare. [4]

Stallion male horse that has not been castrated

A stallion is a male horse that has not been gelded (castrated). Stallions follow the conformation and phenotype of their breed, but within that standard, the presence of hormones such as testosterone may give stallions a thicker, "cresty" neck, as well as a somewhat more muscular physique as compared to female horses, known as mares, and castrated males, called geldings.

Cameron, Texas City in Texas, United States

Cameron is a city in Milam County, Texas, United States. The population was 5,770 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Milam County.

Tucson, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

Tucson is a city in and the county seat of Pima County, Arizona, United States, and is home to the University of Arizona. The 2010 United States Census put the population at 520,116, while the 2015 estimated population of the entire Tucson metropolitan statistical area (MSA) was 980,263. The Tucson MSA forms part of the larger Tucson-Nogales combined statistical area (CSA), with a total population of 1,010,025 as of the 2010 Census. Tucson is the second most-populated city in Arizona behind Phoenix, both of which anchor the Arizona Sun Corridor. The city is 108 miles (174 km) southeast of Phoenix and 60 mi (97 km) north of the U.S.–Mexico border. Tucson is the 33rd largest city and the 58th largest metropolitan area in the United States (2014).

Racing career

In 1942 Joe Reed beat the famous Clabber to be proclaimed Champion Quarter Running Stallion. [2] He raced three times that meet, and won all three races. He had a foot injury and the last race he bled from the foot the whole race, but managed to win the race anyway. [5] After his racing career was cut short by that injury, Joe went on to sire such outstanding horses as Leo P-1335, Little Sister W, Joak, Joe Queen, and Tonta Lad. [6] [7]

Clabber (1936–1947) was a Quarter Horse stallion known as the Iron Horse for his ability to run and win match races after a day of ranch work.

Leo (1940–1967) was one of the most influential Quarter Horse sires in the early years of the American Quarter Horse Association.

Death and honors

Joe Reed II died in 1964 at Fort Bridger, Wyoming. [2]

Fort Bridger, Wyoming CDP in Wyoming, United States

Fort Bridger is a census-designated place (CDP) in Uinta County, Wyoming, United States. The population was 345 at the 2010 census. The town takes its name from the eponymous Fort Bridger established in 1842.

Joe Reed was inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame in 1994. [8]

The American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame and Museum was created by the American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA), based in Amarillo, Texas. Ground breaking construction of the Hall of Fame Museum began in 1989.The distinction is earned by people and horses who have contributed to the growth of the American Quarter Horse and "have been outstanding over a period of years in a variety of categories". In 1982, Bob Denhardt and Ernest Browning were the first individuals to receive the honor of being inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame. In 1989, Wimpy P-1, King P-234, Leo and Three Bars were the first horses inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame.

Pedigree

Faustus (TB)
Bonnie Joe (TB)
Bonnie Rose (TB)
Joe Blair (TB)
Bowling Green (TB)
Miss Blair (TB)
Com-I-Cut (TB)
Joe Reed P-3
Crazy Cue
Old DJ
Mignon
Della Moore
Shamrock
Belle
Dilly
Joe Reed II
Ultimus (TB)
High Time (TB)
Noonday (TB)
Fleeting Time (TB)
Great Britain (TB)
British Fleet (TB)
Belle Nutter (TB)
Nellene
Pancho
Brown Billy
mare by Traveler
Little Red Nell
Texas Chief by Traveler
Red Nell
Mandy

Notes

  1. AQHA Official Stud Book and Registry Combined 1–5 p. 110
  2. 1 2 3 Close and Simmons (ed.), Legends: Outstanding Quarter Horse Stallions and Mares pp. 152-154
  3. Pedigree of Joe Reed II at All Breed Pedigree retrieved on June 22, 2007
  4. LeBlanc Cajun-Bred Running Horses pp. 32-34
  5. Nye "A Dash of Greatness" The Quarter Horse November 1946
  6. Pitzer Most Influential Quarter Horse Sires pp. 62-63
  7. Wagoner Quarter Horse Reference 1974 Edition p. 316
  8. American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA). "Joe Reed II". AQHA Hall of Fame. American Quarter Horse Association. Retrieved September 1, 2017.

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References

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

Nelson Coral Nye (1907–1997) was an American author, editor, and reviewer of Western fiction, and wrote non-fiction books on quarter horses. Besides Nelson C. Nye he also wrote fiction using the pseudonyms Clem Colt and Drake C. Denver. He wrote over 125 books, won two Spur Awards: one for best Western reviewer and critic, and one for his novel Long Run, and in 1968 won the Saddleman Award for "“Outstanding Contributions to the American West.”

Further reading