Joe Reichler

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Joseph Lawrence Reichler (January 1, 1915 – December 12, 1988) was an American sports writer who worked for the Associated Press from 1943 to 1966. He mostly covered the New York City based baseball teams. Reichler also wrote many baseball books, and worked for the Office of the Commissioner of Baseball.

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In 1982 it was discovered that he sold items that had earlier been donated to the Baseball Hall of Fame to cover his financial problems. [1]

He was awarded the J. G. Taylor Spink Award by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in 1980.

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References

  1. Stolen from the baseball hall of Fame

This story was proven false a very long time ago. Joe Reichler never stole anything as he never had access to the hall of fame items. Peter Ueberroth when he was commissioner had a grudge against Joe Reichler and blamed him fkr the theft however, the items sold were property of Joe Reichler and were given to him directly by players. He was never charged with any crime in regards to this and if it was true he would nolonger be in the baseball hall of fame.

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