Joey Bosa

Last updated

Joey Bosa
Joey Bosa 2021.jpg
Bosa with the Los Angeles Chargers in 2021
No. 97 – Los Angeles Chargers
Position: Outside linebacker
Personal information
Born: (1995-07-11) July 11, 1995 (age 27)
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Height:6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Weight:280 lb (127 kg)
Career information
High school: St. Thomas Aquinas
(Fort Lauderdale, Florida)
College: Ohio State (2013–2015)
NFL Draft: 2016  / Round: 1 / Pick: 3
Career history
Roster status:Injured reserve
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of Week 9, 2022
Total tackles:298
Sacks:59.5
Forced fumbles:14
Fumble recoveries:3
Pass deflections:2
Player stats at NFL.com  ·  PFR

Joseph Anthony Bosa (born July 11, 1995) is an American football outside linebacker for the Los Angeles Chargers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Ohio State and was selected third overall by the (then San Diego) Chargers in the 2016 NFL Draft, where he was named NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year. Bosa has since been cited as among the best pass rushers in the NFL. He is the son of former NFL player John Bosa and the older brother of current NFL player Nick Bosa.

Contents

High school career

Bosa attended St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, where he played high school football and basketball for the Raiders. [1] He was rated by Rivals.com as a four-star recruit and was ranked as the fourth best defensive end in his class. [2] Bosa committed to play college football at Ohio State University in April 2012. [3]

College career

As a true freshman in 2013, Bosa started 10 of 14 games, recording 44 tackles and 7.5 sacks. [4] He was named a freshman All-American by the Sporting News and College Football News . [5] In 2014, Bosa was named a Unanimous First-team All-American, becoming the 27th Buckeye in 84 years to do so. [6] He finished his sophomore year with 13.5 sacks on 55 tackles. [7] He earned Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year. [8]

On July 30, 2015, it was announced that Bosa would be suspended from the first game of the 2015 season with three other Ohio State football players for undisclosed reasons. [9] During his junior year, Bosa finished with five sacks and an interception on 47 tackles. [10] On December 31, 2015, he announced his intentions to enter the 2016 NFL Draft. During the 2016 Fiesta Bowl against Notre Dame on January 1, 2016, Bosa was ejected in the first quarter for a targeting penalty when he made a hit on quarterback DeShone Kizer. Ohio State won the Bowl game by a score of 44–28. [11] After his junior season, he entered the 2016 NFL Draft. [12]

Bosa was a highly decorated Buckeye receiving National and Conference honors beginning his Freshman year. In 2013, Bosa was named a First-team Freshman All-American [13] as well as selected to the Freshman All-Big Ten First-team. [14] In 2014, his sophomore year, he was named Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year, Big Ten Lineman of the Year, First-team All-American, and All-Big Ten, as well as a Lombardi Award Finalist. He repeated most of the honors his Junior year, falling short of claiming the Nagurski-Woodson Defensive Player of the Year for the second time.

College statistics

NCAA career statistics
Ohio State Buckeyes
SeasonGPDefense
TcklTfLSckIntFF
2013 114213.57.500
2014 155521.513.504
2015 125116511
Total38148512615

Professional career

In March 2016, Bosa was projected to be a top 10 pick in the 2016 NFL Draft by NFL analyst Daniel Jeremiah. [15] [16] [17] Bosa received an invitation to the NFL combine as a top prospect in the upcoming draft. He completed all of the required combine drills and also participated in positional drills. Bosa met and interviewed with 13 NFL teams at the combine, including the Baltimore Ravens, New Orleans Saints, Dallas Cowboys, Cleveland Browns, and Tennessee Titans. His overall performance at the combine was thought by scouts to be impressive. [18]

Pre-draft measurables
HeightWeightArm lengthHand span 40-yard dash 10-yard split20-yard split 20-yard shuttle Three-cone drill Vertical jump Broad jump Bench press Wonderlic
6 ft 5+14 in
(1.96 m)
269 lb
(122 kg)
33+38 in
(0.85 m)
10+14 in
(0.26 m)
4.77 s1.68 s2.83 s4.21 s6.89 s32 in
(0.81 m)
10 ft 1 in
(3.07 m)
28 reps37
Values from NFL Combine, [19] [20] Bench Press, 40 time, and Broad Jump from Pro Day [21]

Bosa was drafted in the first round with the third overall selection by the San Diego Chargers. [22] He was the first of five Ohio State players to be drafted in the first round of the 2016 NFL Draft, followed by Ezekiel Elliott, Eli Apple, Taylor Decker, and Darron Lee. [23]

For the National Football League My Cause My Cleats program, Bosa has worn cleats in support of pediatric cancer research. [24] [25] [26] [27] [28] The cleats include #MoreThan4 to advocate that more than 4 percent of funding from the National Cancer Institute total annual budget should be allocated to pediatric cancer research. [29]

In May 2021, as part of a Mental Health Awareness Month campaign for the National Football League, Bosa spoke about how he learned to focus on physical and mental well-being. [30]

2016 season

Bosa in 2016 Joey Bosa.jpg
Bosa in 2016

Bosa missed the first four weeks of the season due to a hamstring injury. [31] On 9 October, Bosa made his regular season debut against AFC West rival Oakland Raiders. Although Bosa only played 27 snaps, he finished the game with two sacks, a hit, and four hurries. [32] The following game against the Denver Broncos, he had one quarterback hit, five hurries, and a stop while also drawing double teams throughout the game. [33] Bosa was named Defensive Rookie of the Month for October. [34] Despite being limited to 12 games, Bosa finished his rookie year with 41 tackles, 10.5 sacks, and a forced fumble. He was named the NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year. [35] [36] He was named to the NFL All-Rookie Team. [37] He was ranked as the 100th best player in the league by his peers on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2017. [38]

2017 season

Bosa followed his impressive rookie season with a solid second season, which began with the Chargers' move from San Diego to Los Angeles. [39] He and Melvin Ingram formed one of the best pass rushing duos in the league, with Bosa totaling 70 tackles and 12.5 sacks - seventh in the NFL. [40] [41] On 19 December 2017, Bosa was named to his first Pro Bowl. [42] He was ranked #37 by his fellow players on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2018. [43]

2018 season

Bosa suffered a foot injury, which sidelined him until Week 11 of the 2018 season. [44] In seven games, he recorded 5.5 sacks, 23 combined tackles, nine quarterback hits, and one fumble recovery. [45] He made his playoff debut in the Wild Card Round against the Baltimore Ravens. In the 23-17 win, he had one sack, two tackles, and one quarterback hit. [46] In the Divisional Round against the New England Patriots, he had one tackle in the 41-28 loss. [47] He was ranked 56th by his fellow players on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2019. [48]

2019 season

On 12 April 2019, Bosa switched his jersey number from 99 to 97. He wore 97 during his tenure with Ohio State. [49] On 23 April 2019, the Chargers picked up the fifth-year option on Bosa's contract. [50] In Week 7 against the Tennessee Titans, Bosa sacked Ryan Tannehill twice in the 23–20 loss. [51] In Week 8 against the Chicago Bears, Bosa recorded another two sacks on Mitch Trubisky in the 17–16 win. [52] He was named the AFC Defensive Player of the Week for his performance while his brother, Nick Bosa, won the award for the NFC. [53] In Week 14 against the Jacksonville Jaguars, Bosa sacked rookie quarterback Gardner Minshew twice in the 45–10 blowout win. [54] Bosa made the Pro Bowl after accumulating 11.5 sacks and 67 tackles in total for the 2019 season. [55] [56] He was ranked 34th by his fellow players on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2020. [57]

2020 season

On 28 July 2020, Bosa signed a five-year, $135 million contract extension with the Chargers, making him the highest-paid defensive player in the league. [58] In Week 12 against the Buffalo Bills, Bosa recorded three sacks on Josh Allen and recovered a fumble lost by Allen during the 27–17 loss. [59] He earned his third Pro Bowl nomination. [60] He was ranked 32nd by his fellow players on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2021. [61]

2021 season

Bosa (#97) playing against the Baltimore Ravens in 2021. Ravens vs Chargers - 51602494323 OCT2021 (cropped).jpg
Bosa (#97) playing against the Baltimore Ravens in 2021.

The 2021 season saw Bosa record a career-high 7 forced fumbles. Bosa's best single game for solo tackles in the 2021 season was the 17 October 2021 loss to the Baltimore Ravens. Bosa made 5 solo tackles in the Chargers loss to the Ravens. [62]

Bosa earned his fourth trip to the Pro Bowl but did not play after pulling out of the game with an undisclosed injury. [63] Hall of Fame linebacker Junior Seau and Bosa are the only Chargers defensive players selected to four Pro Bowls over the first five seasons of a career. [64] He was ranked 30th by his fellow players on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2022 list. [65]

2022 season

During Week 3 against the Jacksonville Jaguars, Bosa left the game with a groin injury. It was later revealed that he needed surgery to repair the core muscle area of the groin. He was placed on injured reserve on September 28, 2022. [66]

NFL career statistics

Legend
BoldCareer high
YearTeamGamesTacklesInterceptionsFumbles
GPGSCmbSoloAstSckSftyPDIntYdsAvgLngTDFFFR
2016 SD 121141291210.500.000
2017 LAC 161670541612.510.041
2018 LAC 76231855.500.001
2019 LAC 161667472011.500.010
2020 LAC 12103929107.510.001
2021 LAC 161651361510.500.070
Career79752912137858.0020000123

Personal life

Joey (right) with his brother Nick in 2019 Nick and Joey Bosa, Jan 2019.jpg
Joey (right) with his brother Nick in 2019

Bosa's father, John Bosa, played in the NFL from 1987 to 1989. [67] His brother, Nick Bosa, also played defensive end at Ohio State, and was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers with the second overall pick in 2019. His cousin Jake Kumerow is also an NFL player. Bosa's grandfather Palmer Pyle, uncle Eric Kumerow, and grand-uncle Mike Pyle all played in the NFL as well, while his great-grandfather was Chicago Outfit boss Tony Accardo. [68] [69] [70] [71]

Related Research Articles

Eric Palmer Kumerow is a former American football linebacker who played three seasons for the Miami Dolphins and one season with the Chicago Bears in the National Football League (NFL). He played 42 games in his NFL career.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">John Bosa</span> American football player (born 1964)

John Wilfred Bosa is a former American football defensive end who played three seasons for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League (NFL). He played football for Keene High School in Keene, New Hampshire and received a full athletic scholarship to play football for the Boston College Eagles.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Von Miller</span> American football player (born 1989)

Vonnie B'VSean Miller is an American football outside linebacker for the Buffalo Bills of the National Football League (NFL). Miller played college football at Texas A&M, where he earned consensus All-American honors and the Butkus Award. He was selected by the Denver Broncos second overall in the 2011 NFL Draft.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Corey Liuget</span> American football player (born 1990)

Corey Devon Liuget is a former American football defensive tackle. He played college football at Illinois, and was drafted by the San Diego Chargers in the first round of the 2011 NFL Draft.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Melvin Ingram</span> American football player (born 1989)

Melvin Ingram III is an American football outside linebacker for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of South Carolina, and earned All-American honors. He was selected by the San Diego Chargers in the first round with the 18th overall pick of the 2012 NFL Draft. He has also played for the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Kansas City Chiefs.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bradley Roby</span> American football player (born 1992)

Bradley Roby is an American football cornerback for the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Denver Broncos in the first round of the 2014 NFL Draft. He played college football at Ohio State. He has also played for the Houston Texans.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Khalil Mack</span> American football player (born 1991)

Khalil Delshon Mack is an American football outside linebacker for the Los Angeles Chargers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at the University at Buffalo, and was drafted by the Oakland Raiders with the fifth overall pick in the 2014 NFL Draft.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Aaron Donald</span> American football player (born 1991)

Aaron Charles Donald is an American football defensive tackle for the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Pittsburgh, where he received unanimous All-American honors, and was selected by the Rams in the first round of the 2014 NFL Draft. Regarded as one of the greatest defensive players of all time, he has received a record three Defensive Player of the Year Awards, Pro Bowl selections in all eight of his seasons, and seven first-team All-Pro honors. Donald was also a member of the team that won Super Bowl LVI. The longest-tenured player currently on the Rams roster, Donald is one of two players remaining who was with the team in St. Louis prior to moving to Los Angeles in 2016.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">DeForest Buckner</span> American football player (born 1994)

DeForest George Buckner is an American football defensive tackle for the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at the University of Oregon, and was selected by the San Francisco 49ers in the first round of the 2016 NFL Draft. With the 49ers, Buckner made a Pro Bowl and was a second-team All-Pro selection in 2019. With the Colts, he was selected to the first-team All Pro in 2020 and made the Pro Bowl the following year.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Desmond King (American football)</span> American football player (born 1994)

Desmond King II is an American football cornerback for the Houston Texans of the National Football League (NFL). He earned All-Pro honors in 2018 as both a defensive back and a punt returner. He played college football for the Iowa Hawkeyes, and was drafted by the Los Angeles Chargers in the fifth round of the 2017 NFL Draft. He has also played for the Tennessee Titans.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Yannick Ngakoue</span> American football player (born 1995)

Yannick Nicolas Ngakoue is an American football defensive end for the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Maryland and was drafted by the Jacksonville Jaguars in the third round of the 2016 NFL Draft. He has also played one season each for the Minnesota Vikings, Baltimore Ravens, and Las Vegas Raiders.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Chris Jones (defensive tackle, born 1994)</span> American football player (born 1994)

Christopher Deshun Jones is an American football defensive tackle for the Kansas City Chiefs of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Mississippi State University, and was drafted by the Chiefs in the second round of the 2016 NFL Draft.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">T. J. Watt</span> American football player (born 1994)

Trent Jordan Watt is an American football outside linebacker for the Pittsburgh Steelers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Wisconsin, and was drafted by the Steelers in the first round of the 2017 NFL Draft. His older brothers are J. J. Watt of the Arizona Cardinals and Derek Watt who is a teammate of his on the Steelers. He was a finalist for the NFL Defensive Player of the Year award in 2019 and 2020 before finally winning the award in 2021. In 2021, Watt signed a four-year extension worth over $112 million including $80 million guaranteed, making him the highest paid defensive player in the NFL. Despite missing two games in 2021, he tied the single-season NFL record for most quarterback sacks in a season, matching Michael Strahan's 22.5 sack record that was set in 2001.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Taco Charlton</span> American football player (born 1994)

Vidauntae "Taco" Charlton is an American football defensive end for the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Michigan and was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys in the first round of the 2017 NFL Draft. He has also played for the Miami Dolphins, Kansas City Chiefs, and Pittsburgh Steelers.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sam Hubbard</span> American football player (born 1995)

Sam Hubbard is an American football defensive end for the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Ohio State, and was drafted by the Bengals in the third round of the 2018 NFL Draft.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Nick Bosa</span> American football player (born 1997)

Nicholas John Bosa is an American football defensive end for the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Ohio State and was selected second overall by the 49ers in the 2019 NFL Draft. Bosa was named NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year by having nine sacks in the regular season and helping his team reach Super Bowl LIV. He is the son of former NFL defensive end John Bosa and younger brother of Joey, currently a linebacker for the Los Angeles Chargers.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Shaquille Leonard</span> American football player (born 1995)

Darius Shaquille Leonard is an American football linebacker for the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at South Carolina State and was drafted in the second round of the 2018 NFL Draft by the Colts. In his rookie season, Leonard led the league in tackles and was named a First-Team All-Pro and Defensive Rookie of the Year; he was also voted into the NFL Top 100 the following offseason. Leonard has been informally nicknamed "Maniac" due to his energetic and productive on-field play.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Dre'Mont Jones</span> American football player (born 1997)

Dre'Mont Jones is an American football defensive end for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Ohio State.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Uchenna Nwosu</span> American football player (born 1996)

Uchenna Nwosu is an American football outside linebacker for the Seattle Seahawks of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at USC, and was drafted by the Los Angeles Chargers in the second round with the 48th overall pick of the 2018 NFL Draft.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Chase Young</span> American football player (born 1999)

Chase Young is an American football defensive end for the Washington Commanders of the National Football League (NFL). A native of Maryland, he played college football at Ohio State University for the Buckeyes. During his junior season in 2019, Young broke the school's single-season sack record with 16.5 and was named a unanimous All-American and the recipient of several defensive player of the year awards. He was also named the Big Ten Male Athlete of the Year and was a finalist for the Heisman Trophy, a rare accomplishment for a defensive player.

References

  1. Bournival, Brad. "Ohio State commit and ESPN 150 defensive tackle Joey Bosa accepts Under Armour All-America Game jersey". ESPN.com. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  2. "Joey Bosa, 2013 Strongside defensive end". Rivals.com. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  3. "Joey Bosa commits to Ohio State". MaxPreps.com. Archived from the original on September 21, 2018.
  4. Lesmerises, Doug (April 1, 2014). "'He's going to be a marked guy': What's next for Ohio State's Joey Bosa after a freshman All-American season". cleveland.com. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  5. "Joey Bosa named a Freshman All-American". Ohio State Buckeyes. December 13, 2013. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  6. "Joey Bosa: Unanimous All-American". Ohio State Buckeyes. December 18, 2014. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  7. "Joey Bosa 2014 Game Log". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 25, 2019.
  8. "Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year Winners". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 25, 2019.
  9. Ward, Austin (July 30, 2015). "Ohio State suspends Bosa, 3 others for opener". ESPN.com. Retrieved February 25, 2019.
  10. "Joey Bosa 2015 Game Log". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 25, 2019.
  11. Ward, Austin (January 1, 2016). "Joey Bosa, ejected for targeting, confirms he will enter NFL draft". ESPN.com. Retrieved January 1, 2016.
  12. Ward, Austin. "Joey Bosa of Ohio State Buckeyes, the projected No. 1 prospect, to enter NFL draft". ESPN.com. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  13. Lassan, Steve. "College Football's 2013 Postseason All-Freshman Team". AthlonSports.com. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  14. Bennett, Brian; Rittenberg, Adam. "Christian Hackenberg, Joey Bosa headlines All-Big Ten freshman team - Big Ten Blog- ESPN". ESPN.com. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  15. Jeremiah, Daniel (March 1, 2016). "Mock draft 3.0: Browns strike for Wentz". NFL.com. Retrieved March 11, 2016.
  16. Brooks, Bucky (March 2, 2016). "Mock draft 3.0: 49ers reel in Jack". NFL.com. Retrieved March 11, 2016.
  17. Davis, Charles (March 3, 2016). "Mock draft 2.0: Titans boost defense at No. 1". NFL.com. Retrieved March 11, 2016.
  18. Reineking, Jim (February 28, 2016). "Joey Bosa solidifies status as draft's top edge rusher at combine". NFL.com. Retrieved November 25, 2017.
  19. "Joey Bosa Draft and Combine Prospect Profile". NFL.com. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  20. "Joey Bosa - DE - Ohio State". NFL Combine Results. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  21. "2016 NFL Draft Profile: Joey Bosa". NFL.com. Retrieved April 2, 2016.
  22. "NFL draft: Results, analysis for every Round 1 pick". ESPN.com. April 29, 2016. Retrieved April 29, 2016.
  23. "2016 NFL Draft Listing". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 25, 2019.
  24. Bosa, Joey (December 1, 2017). "My Cause: Joey Bosa for Pediatric Cancer Research". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved June 5, 2022.
  25. "My Cause, My Cleats". www.chargers.com. Retrieved June 5, 2022.
  26. "My Cause, My Cleats 2019". www.chargers.com. Retrieved June 5, 2022.
  27. "My Cause My Cleats 2020". www.chargers.com. Retrieved June 5, 2022.
  28. "My Cause My Cleats 2021 - Chargers". NFL.com. November 23, 2021. Retrieved June 5, 2022.
  29. "Family Advocates for Pediatric Cancer Awareness with #morethan4". who13.com. September 5, 2018. Retrieved June 5, 2022.
  30. Battista, Judy (May 4, 2021). "NFL launching video series in support of Mental Health Awareness Month". NFL.com. Retrieved June 5, 2022.
  31. Landis, Bill (October 7, 2016). "Joey Bosa expected to make NFL debut this week with San Diego Chargers". cleveland.com. Retrieved November 6, 2016.
  32. "San Diego Chargers at Oakland Raiders - October 9th, 2016". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 25, 2019.
  33. "Denver Broncos at San Diego Chargers - October 13th, 2016". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 25, 2019.
  34. Ortega, Mark E. (November 3, 2016). "Tom Brady, David Johnson are Players of the Month". NFL.com. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  35. "Cowboys' Elliott PFWA Rookie/Offensive Rookie of the Year, Chargers' Bosa Defensive Rookie of the Year; 2016 All-Rookie Team named" (Press release). Pro Football Writers Association. January 17, 2017. Archived from the original on January 18, 2017.
  36. Patra, Kevin (February 4, 2017). "Joey Bosa wins NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year". NFL.com.
  37. "2016 NFL All-Rookie Team". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  38. "2017 NFL Top 100". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  39. Schrotenboer, Brent (January 12, 2017). "What we know about Chargers' move to Los Angeles". USA TODAY. Retrieved February 25, 2019.
  40. "Joey Bosa 2017 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 25, 2019.
  41. "2017 NFL Leaders and Leaderboards". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 25, 2019.
  42. "NFL announces 2018 Pro Bowl rosters". NFL.com. December 19, 2017. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  43. "2018 NFL Top 100". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  44. Schefter, Adam (September 16, 2018). "Sources: Bolts' Bosa expected out into October". ESPN.com. Retrieved February 25, 2019.
  45. "Joey Bosa 2018 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 25, 2019.
  46. "Wild Card - Los Angeles Chargers at Baltimore Ravens - January 6th, 2019". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 25, 2019.
  47. "Divisional Round - Los Angeles Chargers at New England Patriots - January 13th, 2019". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 25, 2019.
  48. "2019 NFL Top 100". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  49. Williams, Charean (April 13, 2019). "Joey Bosa, Melvin Gordon switching numbers". ProFootballTalk. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  50. Alper, Josh (April 23, 2019). "Chargers exercise Joey Bosa's 2020 option". Pro Football Talk. NBC Sports. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  51. "Casey recovers fumble, Titans hold off Chargers' rally 23-20". ESPN.com. Associated Press. October 20, 2019. Retrieved October 20, 2019.
  52. "Rivers, Chargers beat Bears 17-16 after Pineiro misses FG". ESPN.com. Associated Press. October 27, 2019. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  53. Bergman, Jeremy (October 30, 2019). "Joey Bosa, Nick Bosa among Players of the Week". NFL.com. Retrieved October 30, 2019.
  54. "Chargers end skid, hand Jaguars 5th straight lopsided loss". ESPN.com. Associated Press. December 8, 2019. Retrieved December 8, 2019.
  55. "2019 NFL Pro Bowlers". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  56. Pickman, Ben (July 28, 2020). "Report: Joey Bosa Signs Five-Year Extension With Chargers". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved September 25, 2020.
  57. "2020 NFL Top 100". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  58. Gordon, Grant (July 28, 2020). "Joey Bosa, Chargers agree to huge 5-year, $135M extension". NFL.com. Retrieved September 25, 2020.
  59. "Los Angeles Chargers at Buffalo Bills - November 29th, 2020". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 1, 2020.
  60. "2020 NFL Pro Bowlers". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  61. "2021 NFL Top 100". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  62. "Joey Bosa Game by Game Stats and Performance". ESPN.com. Retrieved May 27, 2022.
  63. Alper, Josh (January 26, 2022). "Harold Landry replaces Joey Bosa in Pro Bowl". ProFootballTalk. Retrieved May 27, 2022.
  64. Kennedy, Cory (January 31, 2022). "10 Insights: Joey Bosa Joins Chargers Legend with Fourth Pro Bowl Honor". www.chargers.com. Retrieved May 27, 2022.
  65. "2022 NFL Top 100". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  66. "Chargers Sign Richard Rodgers and Jason Moore Jr. to Active Roster". Chargers.com. September 28, 2022. Retrieved October 25, 2022.
  67. Huguenin, Mike (June 6, 2014). "Dad tells Ohio State star Joey Bosa to stop doing back flips". NFL.com. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  68. Wertheim, Jon (May 2, 2019). "Nick Bosa and the 2019 Draft's Oddest Note". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved May 4, 2019.
  69. Thomas, Jeanna (April 18, 2016). "Bosa's great-grandfather was Capone's bodyguard". SBNation.com. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  70. Lesmerises, Doug (January 18, 2014). "Ohio State looking to work family ties for Class of 2016 star DE Nick Bosa: Buckeyes recruiting". cleveland.com. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  71. "Nick Bosa, St. Thomas Aquinas, Strong-Side Defensive End". 247Sports. Retrieved May 22, 2019.