Johannes Conrad Schauer

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Johannes Conrad Schauer [1]
Born16 February 1813
Died24 October 1848 (aged 35)
Nationality Prussian
Scientific career
Fields botany
Institutions University of Greifswald
Author abbrev. (botany) Schauer

Johannes Conrad Schauer (16 February 1813 – 24 October 1848) was a botanist interested in Spermatophytes. [2] He was born in Frankfurt am Main and attended the gymnasium of Mainz from 1825 to 1837. For the next three years he worked at the Hofgarten of Würzburg. Schauer then gained a position as assistant at the botanical garden at Bonn where he worked until 1832 when he was placed in charge of the botanic garden in Breslau, (now Wrocław in Poland) with C.G. Nees. He gained the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg 1835 and was appointed professor of botany at the University of Greifswald from 1843 until his death in 1848. [3] [4]

Although he never visited Australia, many Australian botanists and plant collectors sent him plant specimens, especially eucalypts and other members of the myrtle family, Myrtaceae. For example, when Allan Cunningham died in 1839, Schauer received many botanical specimens from the executor of Cunningham's estate, Robert Heward  [ es; fr ], including Eucalyptus clavigera (now Corymbia clavigera (A.Cunn. & Schauer) K.D. Hill & L.A.S. Johnson). [5] Many of Schauer's descriptions were published in Walpers' Repertorium Botanices Systematicae [6] and Dissertatio phytographica de Regelia, Beaufortia et Calothamno : generibus plantarum Myrtacearum. [7]

The genus Schaueria (family Acanthaceae) was named in his honour by Nees (1838). [8] Calothamnus schaueri and Beaufortia schaueri were also named in his honour.

Selected publications

The standard author abbreviation Schauer is used to indicate this person as the author when citing a botanical name. [10]

Related Research Articles

<i>Eucalyptus melliodora</i>

Eucalyptus melliodora, commonly known as yellow box, honey box or yellow ironbark, is a species of medium-sized to occasionally tall tree that is endemic to south-eastern, continental Australia. It has rough, flaky or fibrous bark on part or all of the trunk, smooth greyish to yellowish bark above. The adult leaves are lance-shaped to egg-shaped, the flower buds are arranged in groups of seven and the fruit is more or less hemispherical.

Wilhelm Gerhard Walpers was a German botanist. This botanist is denoted by the author abbreviation Walp. when citing a botanical name.

<i>Eucalyptus baueriana</i>

Eucalyptus baueriana, commonly known as blue box or round-leaved box, is a tree that is endemic to south-eastern Australia. It has rough, fibrous or flaky bark on the trunk and branches, egg-shaped adult leaves, oval to diamond-shaped flower buds arranged in groups of seven, white flowers and conical fruit.

<i>Eucalyptus miniata</i>

Eucalyptus miniata, commonly known as the Darwin woollybutt or woolewoorrng, is a species of medium-sized to tall tree that is endemic to northern Australia. It has rough, fibrous, brownish bark on the trunk, smooth greyish bark above. Adult leaves are lance-shaped, the flower buds are ribbed and arranged in groups of seven, the flowers orange or scarlet and the fruit is cylindrical to barrel-shaped or urn-shaped, with ribs along the sides.

<i>Eucalyptus acmenoides</i>

Eucalyptus acmenoides, commonly known as white mahogany or barayly, is a tree that is endemic to eastern Australia. It is a large tree with grey to reddish brown, stringy bark, lance-shaped leaves, oval to spindle-shaped buds and more or less hemispherical fruits. The two sides of adult leaves are very different shades of green.

<i>Corymbia eximia</i>

Corymbia eximia, commonly known as the yellow bloodwood, is a bloodwood native to New South Wales. It occurs around the Sydney Basin often in high rainfall areas on shallow sandstone soils on plateaux or escarpments, in fire prone areas. Growing as a gnarled tree to 20 m (66 ft), it is recognisable by its distinctive yellow-brown tessellated bark. The greyish green leaves are thick and veiny, and lanceolate spear- or sickle-shaped. The cream flowerheads grow in panicles in groups of seven and appear in spring. Known for many years as Eucalyptus eximia, the yellow bloodwood was transferred into the new genus Corymbia in 1995 when it was erected by Ken Hill and Lawrie Johnson. It is still seen under the earlier name in some works.

<i>Melaleuca sieberi</i>

Melaleuca sieberi is a shrub or tree in the myrtle, family Myrtaceae, which is endemic to coastal areas of New South Wales and Queensland. It is a large shrub or small tree with papery bark on the trunk, small, sharp leaves and small heads of fluffy flowers in spring. It should not be confused with Callistemon sieberi. When the callistemons were moved to Melaleuca, Callistemon sieberi became Melaleuca paludicola.

<i>Eucalyptus dealbata</i>

Eucalyptus dealbata, known as the tumbledown red gum or hill redgum, is a species of small tree that is endemic to eastern Australia. It has mostly smooth, white to grey or brownish bark, lance-shaped to egg-shaped adult leaves, flower buds in groups of between seven and eleven, white flowers and hemispherical fruit with the valves extended well beyond the rim of the fruit.

Calothamnus huegelii is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is an erect shrub growing to a height of about 2 metres (6.6 ft) with red flowers in autumn or September.

<i>Beaufortia elegans</i>

Beaufortia elegans, commonly known as elegant beaufortia is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is an erect, diffuse shrub with crowded, curved leaves and heads of flowers that are usually reddish purple, although other colours also occur.

<i>Beaufortia micrantha</i>

Beaufortia micrantha, commonly known as small-leaved beaufortia or little bottlebrush, is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is a compact shrub with tiny leaves pressed against the stems and profuse heads of purple or pinkish-coloured flowers.

<i>Beaufortia schaueri</i>

Beaufortia schaueri, commonly known as pink bottlebrush, is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is a small, rounded shrub with small, crowded, linear leaves and profuse, spherical heads of pink flowers conspicuously displayed on the ends of the branches in spring.

<i>Eucalyptus angulosa</i> Species of plant

Eucalyptus angulosa, also known as the ridge fruited mallee or southern ridge fruited mallee, is a eucalypt that is native to Western Australia. The Noongar peoples know the tree as quarral or kwaral.

<i>Eucalyptus oligantha</i>

Eucalyptus oligantha, commonly known as the broad-leaved box, is a species of tree that is native to the Kimberley region of Western Australia and parts of the Northern Territory. It has rough, fibrous or flaky greyish bark, broadly egg-shaped to almost round adult leaves that are lost in the dry season, flower buds in groups of three or seven, creamy yellow to whitish flowers and cup-shaped to more or less cylindrical, bell-shaped or conical fruit.

<i>Corymbia clavigera</i>

Corymbia clavigera, commonly known as apple gum or cabbage gum, is a species of tree that is endemic to a small area in the north-west Kimberley region of Western Australia. It has smooth, pale grey and white bark, lance-shaped or elliptical adult leaves, flower buds in groups of three or seven, white flowers and urn-shaped to barrel-shaped fruit.

<i>Corymbia ferruginea</i>

Corymbia ferruginea, commonly known as the rusty bloodwood, is a species of tree that is endemic to northern Australia. It has rough, tessellated bark on the trunk and branches, a crown of sessile juvenile leaves, flower buds in groups of three or seven, pale creamy yellow flowers and urn-shaped fruit.

<i>Corymbia setosa</i>

Corymbia setosa, commonly known as the rough leaved bloodwood or desert bloodwood, is a species of small tree that is endemic to north-eastern Australia. It has rough, tessellated brown bark on the trunk and branches, a crown of juvenile, heart-shaped leaves arranged in opposite pairs, flower buds in groups of three or seven, white flowers and urn-shaped to shortened spherical fruit.

<i>Kunzea phylicoides</i>

Kunzea phylicoides, commonly known as the slender burgan, is a flowering plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to south-eastern Australia. It is an erect shrub with drooping branches, fibrous or corky bark, bright green, narrow leaves and clusters of white flowers in spring.

<i>Leptospermum divaricatum</i>

Leptospermum divaricatum is a species of plant that is endemic to inland New South Wales. It is an erect or weeping shrub with compact fibrous bark, elliptical to egg-shaped leaves, white flowers arranged singly on short axillary side shoots and woody fruit that fall off when mature.

Leptospermum speciosum is a species of shrub that is endemic to eastern Australia. It has pale bark that is shed in strips, broadly lance-shaped to elliptical leaves, white flowers arranged singly or in groups of up to three in leaf axils, and small, woody fruit that falls off when mature.

References

  1. Walsh, Neville; Moje, Christine. "Schauer, Johann Conrad (1813 - 1848)". Encyclopedia of Australian Science. Retrieved 4 August 2015.
  2. "Schauer, Johannes Conrad (1813-1848)". Author Details. IPNI. 1991-07-11. Retrieved 2008-03-03. Area of Interest: Spermatophytes
  3. Stafleu, Frans A.; Cowan, Richard S. (1985). Taxonomic literature : a selective guide to botanical publications and collections with dates, commentaries and types. Volume 5, Sal-Ste (2nd ed.). Utrecht, Netherlands: Bohn, Scheltema & Holkema. ISBN   9031306312 . Retrieved 24 December 2015.
  4. "Eucalyptus lehmannii — Bushy Yate". Plant of the Month. FloraBase. February 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-04.
  5. Webb, Joan B. (June 2012). "Allan Cunningham in Careening Bay, W.A.". Australian Systematic Botany Society Newsletter (151): 3–6.
  6. Walpers, Wilhelm Gerhard (1843). Repertorium Botanices Systematicae (Volume 2). Lipsiae, Sumptibus Friderici Hofmeister. pp. 924–932. Retrieved 4 August 2015.
  7. "Published Resources Details". Encyclopedia of Australian Science. Retrieved 4 August 2015.
  8. "Schaueria". International Plant Names Index (IPNI). Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Retrieved 4 August 2015.
  9. Works by or about Johann Konrad Schauer in libraries ( WorldCat catalog)
  10. IPNI.  Schauer.