John Blake Dillon

Last updated

John Blake Dillon (1814 - 1866) JohnBlakeDillon.jpg
John Blake Dillon (1814 - 1866)

John Blake Dillon (5 May 1814 – 15 September 1866) was an Irish writer and politician who was one of the founding members of the Young Ireland movement.

Contents

John Blake Dillon was born in the town of Ballaghaderreen, on the border of counties Mayo and Roscommon. [1] He was a son of Anne Blake and her husband Luke Dillon (d. 1826), who had been a land agent for his cousin Patrick Dillon, 11th Earl of Roscommon. [2] His niece was Anne Deane, who helped to raise his family after his death.

He was educated at St. Patrick's College, Maynooth, leaving after only two years there, having decided that he was not meant for the priesthood. [3] He later studied law at Trinity College, Dublin (TCD), and in London, before being called to the Irish Bar. [4]

It was during his time at TCD that he first met and befriended Thomas Davis.

While working for The Morning Register newspaper he met Charles Gavan Duffy, with whom he and Davis founded The Nation in 1842, which was dedicated to promoting Irish nationalism and all three men became important members of Daniel O'Connell's Repeal Association, which advocated the repeal of the Act of Union 1800 between Great Britain and Ireland. [5] [6]

The young wing of the party, of which they were key members with William Smith O'Brien and Thomas Francis Meagher, came to be known as Young Ireland and advocated the threat of force to achieve repeal of the Act of Union. [7] [8] This was in contrast to the committed pacifism of O'Connell's "Old Ireland" wing. [9] [10] This posturing eventually led to the Young Ireland rebellion of 1848 where a countryside devastated by the Great Famine failed to rise up and support the rebels. [11] [12]

According to fellow Irish nationalist, Justin McCarthy:

"...it has been said of him that while he strongly discouraged the idea of armed rebellion, and had no faith in the possibility of Ireland's succeeding by any movement of insurrection, yet when Smith O'Brien risked Ireland's chances in the open field, he cast his lot with his leader and stood by his side in Tipperary." [13]

After the failure of Young Ireland's uprising, Dillon fled Ireland, escaping first to France and, eventually, to the United States, where he served the New York Bar. [14]

Dillon returned to Ireland on amnesty in 1855 and in 1865 was elected as a Member of Parliament for Tipperary. By now he advocated a Federal union of Britain and Ireland and denounced the violent methods advocated by the Irish Republican Brotherhood or Fenian movement. [15]

John Blake Dillon died of cholera in Killiney, Co. Dublin, aged 52, and is buried in Glasnevin Cemetery, Dublin.

He was the father of John Dillon, and grandfather of James Dillon. [16]

Related Research Articles

John Mitchel

John Mitchel was an Irish nationalist activist, author, and political journalist. In the Famine years of the 1840s he was a leading writer for The Nation newspaper produced by the Young Ireland group and their splinter from Daniel O'Connell's Repeal Association, the Irish Confederation. As editor of his own paper, the United Irishman, in 1848 Mitchel was sentenced to 14-years penal transportation, the penalty for his advocacy of James Fintan Lalor's programme of co-ordinated resistance to exactions of landlords and to the continued shipment of harvests to England.

<i>The Nation</i> (Irish newspaper) 19th century Irish newspaper

The Nation was an Irish nationalist weekly newspaper, published in the 19th century. The Nation was printed first at 12 Trinity Street, Dublin from 15 October 1842 until 6 January 1844. The paper was afterwards published at 4 D'Olier Street from 13 July 1844, to 28 July 1848, when the issue for the following day was seized and the paper suppressed. It was published again in Middle Abbey Street on its revival in September 1849.

Daniel OConnell Irish political leader

Daniel O'Connell, hailed in his time as The Liberator, was the acknowledged political leader of Ireland's Roman Catholic majority in the first half of the 19th century. His mobilisation of Catholic Ireland through to the poorest class of tenant farmer helped secure Catholic emancipation in 1829 and allowed him to take a seat in the United Kingdom Parliament to which he had twice been elected. At Westminster O'Connell championed liberal and reform causes but failed in his declared objective for Ireland: the restoration of a separate Irish Parliament through repeal of the 1800 Act of Union. Against the background of a growing agrarian crisis and, in his final years, of the Great Irish Famine, O'Connell contended with dissension at home. Criticism of his political compromises and system of patronage led to a split in the national movement he had singularly led.

Thomas Davis (Young Irelander) Irish writer and activist

Thomas Osborne Davis was an Irish writer; with Charles Gavan Duffy and John Blake Dillon, a founding editor of The Nation, the weekly organ of what came to be known as the Young Ireland movement. While embracing the common cause of a representative, national government for Ireland, Davis took issue with the nationalist leader Daniel O'Connell by arguing for the common ("mixed") education of Catholics and Protestants and by advocating for Irish as the national language.

Charles Gavan Duffy Irish poet and journalist

Sir Charles Gavan Duffy, KCMG, PC, was an Irish poet and journalist, Young Irelander and tenant-rights activist. After emigrating to Australia in 1856 he entered the politics of Victoria on a platform of land reform, and in 1871-72 served as the colony's 8th Premier.

William Smith OBrien Irish nationalist politician (1803–1864)

William Smith O'Brien was an Irish nationalist Member of Parliament (MP) and a leader of the Young Ireland movement. He also encouraged the use of the Irish language. He was convicted of sedition for his part in the Young Irelander "Famine Rebellion" of 1848 but his sentence of death was commuted to deportation to Van Diemen's Land. In 1854, he was released on the condition of exile from Ireland, and he lived in Brussels for two years. In 1856 Smith O'Brien was pardoned and returned to Ireland, but he was never active again in politics.

Terence MacManus

Terence Bellew MacManus was an Irish rebel who participated in the Young Irelander Rebellion of 1848. Sentenced to death for treason, he and several other participants were given commuted sentences in 1849 and transported for life to Van Diemen's Land in Australia. Three years later in 1852, MacManus escaped and emigrated to the United States.

Thomas Francis Meagher Irish nationalist and American politician

Thomas Francis Meagher was an Irish nationalist and leader of the Young Irelanders in the Rebellion of 1848. After being convicted of sedition, he was first sentenced to death, but received transportation for life to Van Diemen's Land in Australia.

Young Ireland 19th-century Irish nationalist movement

Young Ireland was a political and cultural movement in the 1840s committed to an all-Ireland struggle for independence and democratic reform. Grouped around the Dublin weekly The Nation, it took issue with the compromises and clericalism of the larger national movement, Daniel O'Connell's Repeal Association, from which it seceded in 1847. Despairing, in the face of the Great Famine, of any other course, in 1848 Young Irelanders attempted an insurrection. Following the arrest and the exile of most of their leading figures, the movement split between those who carried the commitment to "physical force" forward into the Irish Republican Brotherhood, and those who sought to build a "League of North and South" linking an independent Irish parliamentary party to tenant agitation for land reform.

Dr. Robert Cane (1807–1858), was born in Kilkenny, Ireland in 1807. He was a member of the Repeal Association and the Irish Confederation. He qualified as an M.D. in 1836, became a member of Kilkenny Corporation and was Mayor twice.

The Young Irelander Rebellion was a failed Irish nationalist uprising led by the Young Ireland movement, part of the wider Revolutions of 1848 that affected most of Europe. It took place on 29 July 1848 at Farranrory, a small settlement about 4.3 km north-northeast of the village of Ballingarry, South Tipperary. After being chased by a force of Young Irelanders and their supporters, an Irish Constabulary unit took refuge in a house and held those inside as hostages. A several-hour gunfight followed, but the rebels fled after a large group of police reinforcements arrived.

Michael Doheny

Michael Doheny was an Irish writer, lawyer, member of the Young Ireland movement, and co-founder of the Irish Republican Brotherhood, an Irish secret society which would go on to launch the Fenian Raids on Canada, Fenian Rising of 1867 and the Easter Rising of 1916, each of which was an attempt to bring about Irish Independence from Britain.

John Edward Pigot (1822–1871) was an Irish music collector and lawyer, who played a key role in the foundation of the National Gallery of Ireland.

James Fintan Lalor

James Fintan Lalor was an Irish revolutionary, journalist, and “one of the most powerful writers of his day.” A leading member of the Irish Confederation, he was to play an active part in both the Rebellion in July 1848 and the attempted Rising in September of that same year. Lalor's writings were to exert a seminal influence on later Irish leaders such as Michael Davitt, James Connolly, Pádraig Pearse, and Arthur Griffith.

Patrick ODonoghue (Young Irelander)

Patrick O'Donoghue (1810–1854), also known as Patrick O'Donohoe or O'Donoghoe, from Clonegal, County Carlow, was an Irish Nationalist revolutionary and journalist, a member of the Young Ireland movement.

John Martin (Young Irelander)

John Martin was an Irish nationalist activist who shifted from early militant support for Young Ireland and Repeal, to non-violent alternatives such as support for tenant farmers' rights and eventually as the first Home Rule MP, for Meath 1871–1875.

The Irish Confederation was an Irish nationalist independence movement, established on 13 January 1847 by members of the Young Ireland movement who had seceded from Daniel O'Connell's Repeal Association. Historian T. W. Moody described it as "the official organisation of Young Ireland".

Thomas Devin Reilly

Thomas Devin Reilly(Tomás Damhán Ó Raghailligh) was an Irish revolutionary, Young Irelander and journalist.

Thomas MacNevin was an influential Irish writer and journalist, who died under "peculiarly sad circumstances" in a Bristol asylum. According to T. F. O'Sullivan, he was one of the most "brilliant intellects" to be associated with The Nation newspaper and with the Young Ireland movement.

John Kenyon (1812–1869) was an Irish Catholic priest and nationalist, who was involved in the Young Ireland movement and the Irish Confederation. He was renowned for his strong political and religious views which alienated him from many of his colleagues, and resulted in his being twice suspended from clerical duties. In particular, Kenyon was known for his opposition to the Irish political leader, Daniel O'Connell. Kenyon advocated the use of force to achieve political goals and refused to condemn slavery.

References

  1. O'Cathaoir, Brendan. "John Blake Dillon, Young Irelander" pg. 5. Irish Academic Press, 1990.
  2. Montgomery-Massingberd, Hugh ed., Burke's Irish Family Records (Burkes Peerage Ltd, London, 1976), pg. 363.
  3. Mulvey, Helen. "Thomas Davis and Ireland." Page 56. CUA Press, 2003
  4. Mulvey, Helen. "Thomas Davis and Ireland." Page 56-57. CUA Press, 2003.
  5. Thomas E. Hachey, Joseph M. Hernon, Lawrence John McCaffrey. "The Irish Experience: A Concise History," Pages 73. M.E. Sharpe, 1996
  6. Mulvey, Helen. "Thomas Davis and Ireland." Page 57-58. CUA Press, 2003
  7. Thomas E. Hachey, Joseph M. Hernon, Lawrence John McCaffrey. "The Irish Experience: A Concise History," Pages 62 & 90. M.E. Sharpe, 1996
  8. Mary Teresa Hayden, George Aloysius Moonan. "A Short History of the Irish People from the Earliest Times to 1920," Pages 489-491. London: Longmans, Green & Co., 1922
  9. Thomas E. Hachey, Joseph M. Hernon, Lawrence John McCaffrey. "The Irish Experience: A Concise History," Pages 62 & 90. M.E. Sharpe, 1996
  10. Mary Teresa Hayden, George Aloysius Moonan. "A Short History of the Irish People from the Earliest Times to 1920," Pages 489-491. London: Longmans, Green & Co., 1922
  11. Thomas E. Hachey, Joseph M. Hernon, Lawrence John McCaffrey. "The Irish Experience: A Concise History," Pages 62 & 90. M.E. Sharpe, 1996
  12. Mary Teresa Hayden, George Aloysius Moonan. "A Short History of the Irish People from the Earliest Times to 1920," Page 502. London: Longmans, Green & Co., 1922
  13. McCarthy, Juston. "Reminiscences: Vol II," Page 323 New York: Harper & Bros. Publishers, 1899
  14. W. J. McCormack, Patrick Gillan. "The Blackwell Companion to Modern Irish Culture," Page 167. New York: Wiley-Blackwell, 2001
  15. W. J. McCormack, Patrick Gillan. "The Blackwell Companion to Modern Irish Culture," Page 167. New York: Wiley-Blackwell, 2001
  16. W. J. McCormack, Patrick Gillan. "The Blackwell Companion to Modern Irish Culture," Page 167. New York: Wiley-Blackwell, 2001

Further reading

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Tipperary
1865 – 1866
With: Charles Moore
Succeeded by