John Blyth (bishop)

Last updated

John Blyth
Bishop of Salisbury
Appointed13 November 1493
Term ended23 August 1499
Predecessor Thomas Langton
Successor Henry Deane
Orders
Consecration23 February 1494
Personal details
Died23 August 1499
DenominationCatholic
Previous post(s) Archdeacon of Richmond
North transept of the Salisbury Cathedral with the tomb of John Blyth in the middle. Catedral de Salisbury, Salisbury, Inglaterra, 2014-08-12, DD 35-37 HDR.JPG
North transept of the Salisbury Cathedral with the tomb of John Blyth in the middle.

John Blyth or John Blythe (before 1460 – 23 August 1499) was a medieval Bishop of Salisbury.

Blyth was Archdeacon of Richmond from 1485 to 1493 [1] and was Master of the Rolls 5 May 1492 13 February 1494. [2] [ dubious ] He was nominated to Salisbury on 13 November 1493 and consecrated on 23 February 1494, serving until his death five-and-a-half years later, on 23 August 1499. [3] His brother Geoffrey was Bishop of Lichfield. [4]

Notes

Related Research Articles

Thomas Langton was chaplain to King Edward IV, before becoming successively Bishop of St David's, Bishop of Salisbury, Bishop of Winchester, and Archbishop-elect of Canterbury.

Alexander Neville was a late medieval prelate who served as Archbishop of York from 1374 to 1388.

Robert Waldby was a native of York and friar of the Order of Saint Augustine who followed Edward, the Black Prince into Aquitaine. After studying at Toulouse, he became professor of theology there. He later became close to Edward's son, King Richard II. He was a firm opponent of John Wycliffe, wrote a book denouncing him, and was a member of the Synod which assembled at Oxford in 1382 to judge his orthodoxy.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lawrence Booth</span> 15th-century Archbishop of York and Chancellor of England

Lawrence Booth served as Prince-Bishop of Durham and Lord Chancellor of England, before being appointed Archbishop of York.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Archbishop of York</span> Senior bishop in the Church of England

The archbishop of York is a senior bishop in the Church of England, second only to the archbishop of Canterbury. The archbishop is the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of York and the metropolitan bishop of the province of York, which covers the northern regions of England as well as the Isle of Man.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bishop of Worcester</span> Diocesan bishop in the Church of England

The Bishop of Worcester is the head of the Church of England Diocese of Worcester in the Province of Canterbury, England.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bishop of Rochester</span> Diocesan bishop in the Church of England

The Bishop of Rochester is the ordinary of the Church of England's Diocese of Rochester in the Province of Canterbury.

John Sherwood was an English churchman and diplomat.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">John Booth (bishop)</span> 15th-century Bishop of Exeter

John Booth was a 15th-century English prelate who held numerous appointments in the church and royal service.

William Langton was a medieval English priest and nephew of Archbishop Walter de Gray. William was selected but never consecrated as Archbishop of York and Bishop of Carlisle.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">John Harewell</span> 14th-century Bishop of Bath and Wells

John Harewell was a Bishop of Bath and Wells in medieval England.

Nicholas Bubwith (1355-1424) was a Bishop of London, Bishop of Salisbury and Bishop of Bath and Wells as well as Lord Privy Seal and Lord High Treasurer of England.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">John Arundel (bishop of Chichester)</span> 15th-century Bishop of Chichester

John Arundel was a medieval Bishop of Chichester.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Richard Beauchamp (bishop)</span> 15th-century Bishop of Hereford and Bishop of Salisbury

Richard Beauchamp was a medieval Bishop of Hereford and Bishop of Salisbury.

Thomas Kempe was a medieval Bishop of London.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Richard Marsh (bishop)</span> 13th-century Chancellor of England and Bishop of Durham

Richard Marsh, also called Richard de Marisco, served as Lord Chancellor of England and Bishop of Durham.

James Blakedon O.P., D.Th. was a medieval prelate who served as Bishop of Achonry from 1442 to 1453, then Bishop of Bangor from 1453 to 1464.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">James Bowstead</span>

James Bowstead (1801–1843) was an Anglican clergyman who served in the Church of England as the Bishop of Sodor and Man (1838–1840) and Bishop of Lichfield (1840–1843).

Henry Bridgeman was an Anglican clergyman who served in the Church of England as the Bishop of Sodor and Man from 1671 to 1682.

Charles Booth, D.C.L. was a sixteenth-century clergyman who served as the Bishop of Hereford from 1516 to 1535.

References

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by Bishop of Salisbury
1493–1499
Succeeded by