John Bryan (art director)

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Eric John Bryan Pratt [1] (12 August 1911 – 10 June 1969), known professionally as John Bryan, was a British art director and film producer.

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John Bryan was born in Kensington, London, [1] England. He won the Oscar for Best Art Direction for the film Great Expectations in 1948. [2] He was nominated twice more, for Caesar and Cleopatra in 1947 [3] and for Becket in 1965. [4] [5] Bryan also won a BAFTA for Becket.

In 1959, he was a member of the jury at the 9th Berlin International Film Festival. [6]

He died from cancer at a hospital in Thames Ditton, Surrey, on 10 June 1969. [1]

Filmography

Art director

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Bryan, John (1911–1969)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/105373.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  2. "The 20th Academy Awards (1948) Nominees and Winners". Oscars.org (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences). Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-08-18.
  3. "The 19th Academy Awards (1947) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-08-19.
  4. "The 37th Academy Awards (1965) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on 2014-10-31. Retrieved 2011-08-24.
  5. "The Official Academy Awards® Database". Archived from the original on 2012-07-11. Retrieved 2011-06-30.
  6. "9th Berlin International Film Festival: Juries". berlinale.de. Retrieved 2010-01-05.