John Burningham

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John Burningham
Born(1936-04-27)27 April 1936
Farnham, Surrey, England
Died4 January 2019(2019-01-04) (aged 82)
London, England
OccupationAuthor and illustrator

John Burningham (27 April 1936 – 4 January 2019) was an English author and illustrator of children's books, especially picture books for young children. [1] He lived in north London with his wife Helen Oxenbury, another illustrator. [2] His last published work was a husband-and-wife collaboration, There's Going to Be a New Baby (Walker Books, September 2011), written by John and illustrated by Helen for "ages 2+". [3] [4]

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Helen Gillian Oxenbury is an English illustrator and writer of children's picture books. She lives in North London. She is a two-time winner and four-time runner up for the annual Kate Greenaway Medal, the British librarians' award for illustration. For the 50th anniversary of that Medal (1955–2005) her 1999 illustrated edition of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland was named one of the top ten winning works.

Contents

Burningham won the 1963 and 1970 Kate Greenaway Medals for British children's book illustration. [5] [6] The first was for his debut as illustrator (and author), Borka: The Adventures of a Goose with No Feathers , named one of the top ten winning works for the 50th anniversary of the Medal (1955–2005). [7] His second Greenaway Medal winner, Mr Gumpy's Outing (1970), is his work most widely held in WorldCat participating libraries, [8] and it also won the annual Boston Globe–Horn Book Award (US) in the picture books category. [9]

The Kate Greenaway Medal is a British literary award that annually recognises "distinguished illustration in a book for children". It is conferred upon the illustrator by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) which inherited it from the Library Association.

<i>Borka: The Adventures of a Goose with No Feathers</i>

Borka: The Adventures of a Goose With No Feathers is a children's picture book written and illustrated by John Burningham and published by Jonathan Cape in 1963. It features a goose born without feathers, whose mother knits a jersey that helps in some ways.

Mr Gumpy's Outing is a children's picture book written and illustrated by John Burningham and published by Jonathan Cape in 1970. According to library catalogue summaries, "All the animals went for a boat ride with Mr Gumpy. Then the boat got too heavy ..."; "Mr Gumpy accepts more and more riders on his boat until the inevitable occurs." Burningham won the annual Kate Greenaway Medal from the Library Association, recognising the year's best children's book illustration by a British subject, and the Boston Globe–Horn Book Award, a similar award by a magazine for a picture books published in the U.S.

For his lasting contribution as a children's illustrator, Burningham was one of five or six finalists in 2012 and in 2014 for the biennial, international Hans Christian Andersen Award, the highest recognition available to creators of children's books. [10] [11] [12] He was the UK's national nominee in 1980 and 1986. [13]

Hans Christian Andersen Award biennial awards to an illustrator and a writer of childrens literature

The Hans Christian Andersen Awards are two literary awards by the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY), recognising one living author and one living illustrator for their "lasting contribution to children's literature". The writing award was inaugurated in 1956, the illustration award in 1966. The former is sometimes called the "Nobel Prize for children's literature".

Biography

Burningham was born 27 April 1936, in Farnham, Surrey, England, to Charles and Jessie (Mackintosh) Burningham. [3] [14] He was educated at the alternative school Summerhill. [4] When called up for National Service he registered as a conscientious objector, and served in forestry and housing projects. [15] He entered the Central School of Art when he was 20 and graduated in 1959. [4] After work on posters (for London and British Transport) and animated films, [14] Burningham debuted both as book author and book illustrator in 1963 [16] with the picture book Borka: The Adventures of a Goose With No Feathers , [17] published by Jonathan Cape. For that he won the 1963 Kate Greenaway Medal from the Library Association, recognising the year's best children's book illustration by a British subject. [3] [5] For the 50th anniversary of the Medal (1955–2005), a panel of experts named Borka one of the top ten winning works, which composed the ballot for a public election of the nation's favourite. [7]

Farnham town in Surrey, England

Farnham is a town in Surrey, England, within the Borough of Waverley. The town is 34.5 miles (55.5 km) southwest of London in the extreme west of Surrey, adjacent to the border with Hampshire. By road, Guildford is 11 miles (17 km) to the east and Winchester a further 28 miles (45 km) along the same axis as London. Farnham is the second largest town in Waverley, and one of the five largest conurbations in Surrey. It is of historic interest, with many old buildings, including a number of Georgian houses. Farnham Castle overlooks the town. A short distance southeast of the town centre are the ruins of Waverley Abbey, Moor Park House and Mother Ludlam's Cave. Farnham is twinned with Andernach in Germany. It is drained by the River Wey which is navigable only to canoes at this point.

Surrey County of England

Surrey is a subdivision of the English region of South East England in the United Kingdom. A historic and ceremonial county, Surrey is also one of the home counties. The county borders Kent to the east, East Sussex and West Sussex to the south, Hampshire to the west, Berkshire to the northwest, and Greater London to the northeast.

An alternative school is an educational establishment with a curriculum and methods that are nontraditional. Such schools offer a wide range of philosophies and teaching methods; some have strong political, scholarly, or philosophical orientations, while others are more ad hoc assemblies of teachers and students dissatisfied with some aspect of mainstream or traditional education.

Cape was soon looking for someone to illustrate a forthcoming children's adventure serial called Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang that was written by Ian Fleming, its most successful author at the time. [18] Fleming had suggested cartoonist "Trog" (Wally Fawkes) of the Daily Mail, but the newspaper would not allow the illustrator of their popular Flook strip to work for an author whose James Bond stories were adapted as a comic strip for its arch-rival Daily Express. Fleming consulted his motor engineer friend Charles Amherst Villiers, who produced a sketch based on Fleming's description of the magical car—this drawing was passed to Cape's popular new illustrator John Burningham, who was asked to illustrate the whole series on the strength of his debut story Borka. Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang was originally published in three volumes, 1964–1965; the omnibus edition followed in 1968. Burningham's witty and timeless art-work, along with Fleming's imaginative text, led Chitty to become the most famous and best loved car in English-language fiction. [19]

Ian Fleming English author, journalist and naval intelligence officer

Ian Lancaster Fleming was an English author, journalist and naval intelligence officer who is best known for his James Bond series of spy novels. Fleming came from a wealthy family connected to the merchant bank Robert Fleming & Co., and his father was the Member of Parliament for Henley from 1910 until his death on the Western Front in 1917. Educated at Eton, Sandhurst and, briefly, the universities of Munich and Geneva, Fleming moved through several jobs before he started writing.

Walter Ernest "Wally" Fawkes is a British-Canadian jazz clarinetist and a satirical cartoonist. As a cartoonist, he usually worked under the name "Trog" until failing eyesight forced him to retire in 2005 at the age of 81.

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The James Bond series focuses on a fictional British Secret Service agent created in 1953 by writer Ian Fleming, who featured him in twelve novels and two short-story collections. Since Fleming's death in 1964, eight other authors have written authorised Bond novels or novelizations: Kingsley Amis, Christopher Wood, John Gardner, Raymond Benson, Sebastian Faulks, Jeffery Deaver, William Boyd and Anthony Horowitz. The latest novel is Forever and a Day by Anthony Horowitz, published in May 2018. Additionally Charlie Higson wrote a series on a young James Bond, and Kate Westbrook wrote three novels based on the diaries of a recurring series character, Moneypenny.

In 1964 Burningham married author-illustrator Helen Gillian Oxenbury, [14] who won the 1969 Greenaway Medal. He won the next year for Mr Gumpy's Outing (Cape, 1970), the first illustrator to win twice. [6] [20] [21] Oxenbury was later a highly commended runner up four times, and eventually won a second Medal of her own for an edition of Alice in Wonderland (Walker, 1999) that was also named to the anniversary top ten. [7] [20]

Burningham has contributed to more than 60 other books [4] and has received many awards [21] including the 1980 Deutscher Jugendliteraturpreis, Picture book category, for Was ist dir lieber ... ( ISBN   3-7941-5094-5), the German-language edition of Would you rather ... (Cape, 1978, ISBN   0-224-01635-0). Google books calls it 'A series of comical choices such as, "Would you rather eat spider stew or slug dumplings or mashed worms?"'

For both writing and illustrating Granpa (1984), he won the "Emil": the Kurt Maschler Award, annually (1982 to 1999) recognising one UK-published "work of imagination for children, in which text and illustration are integrated so that each enhances and balances the other." [22] It was adapted as a 1989 animated film of the same name.

In 2012 Burningham was one of five finalists for the biennial international Hans Christian Andersen Award for Illustration, which recognises a living "illustrator whose complete works have made lasting contributions to children's literature." Thirty national sections of the International Board on Books for Young People had exercised the option to nominate someone. The jury summarised, "John Burningham from the UK uses delicate irony mixed with innocence and high seriousness that with his use of line and colour, creates an intimacy with the reader." [11]

Burningham died in London on 4 January 2019, at the age of 82, after contracting pneumonia. [23] [24]

Selected works

Burningham both wrote and illustrated almost all of his published books. The exceptions are listed here: [4]

Works about Burningham

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References

  1. "John Burningham". Bloomsbury.com. Retrieved 28 August 2012.
  2. "Helen Oxenbury". Fresh Fiction. Retrieved 29 June 2012.
  3. 1 2 3 "John Burningham". Walker Books. Retrieved 28 August 2012.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "John Burningham". British Council: Literature. Retrieved 28 August 2012.
  5. 1 2 (Greenaway Winner 1963). Living Archive: Celebrating the Carnegie and Greenaway Winners. CILIP. Retrieved 15 July 2012.
  6. 1 2 (Greenaway Winner 1970). Living Archive: Celebrating the Carnegie and Greenaway Winners. CILIP. Retrieved 15 July 2012.
  7. 1 2 3 "70 Years Celebration: Anniversary Top Tens". The CILIP Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Children's Book Awards. CILIP. Retrieved 29 June 2012.
  8. "Burningham, John". WorldCat. Retrieved 28 August 2012.
  9. "Boston Globe–Horn Book Awards: Winners and Honor Books 1967 to present". The Horn Book. Archived from the original on 14 December 2012. Retrieved 29 November 2012.
  10. "2012 Awards". Hans Christian Andersen Awards. International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY).
      "John Burningham – Finalist". Hans Christian Andersen Awards. IBBY. Retrieved 2013-07-20.
  11. 1 2 "The Hans Christian Andersen Award Jury of IBBY Announces the 2012 Short List" Archived 30 July 2012 at the Wayback Machine . IBBY press release 6 March 2012. Raab Associates. Retrieved 26 November 2012.
  12. "2014 Awards". Hans Christian Andersen Awards. International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY). With contemporary material including the 17 March 2014 shortlist press release. Retrieved 23 March 2014.
  13. "Candidates for the Hans Christian Andersen Awards 1956–2002" Archived 14 January 2013 at Archive.today . The Hans Christian Andersen Awards, 1956–2002. IBBY. Gyldendal. 2002. Pages 110–18. Hosted by Austrian Literature Online (literature.at). Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  14. 1 2 3 "Picture Books Author of the Month: John Burningham". Greenville Public Library entry. Retrieved 15 March 2008.
  15. Flood, Alison (7 January 2019). "John Burningham, children's author and illustrator, dies aged 82". The Guardian.
  16. "John Burningham". The British Library. Archived from the original on 29 March 2008. Retrieved 15 March 2008.
  17. "Borka ... 40th Anniversary Edition". Biblio.com. Retrieved 15 March 2008.
  18. Howard, Michael. Jonathan Cape, Publisher (Cape, 1971).
  19. Selina Skipwith (Keeper of Art at The Fleming Collection). "John Burningham: An Illustrated Journey". Scottish Arts News Magazine 16, Autumn 2011.
  20. 1 2 "Kate Greenaway Medal" Archived 16 September 2014 at the Wayback Machine . 2007(?). Curriculum Lab. Elihu Burritt Library. Central Connecticut State University. Retrieved 29 June 2012.
  21. 1 2 "John (Mackintosh) Burningham (1936-) Biography – Personal, Addresses, Career, Honors Awards, Writings, Adaptations, Sidelights". jrank.org. Retrieved 15 March 2008.
  22. "Kurt Maschler Awards". Book Awards. bizland.com. Retrieved 16 July 2012.
  23. Flood, Alison (7 January 2019). "John Burningham, children's author and illustrator, dies aged 82". The Guardian.
  24. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/13/obituaries/john-burningham-dies-at-82.html