John C. B. Ehringhaus

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John C. B. Ehringhaus
JohnEhringhaus.jpg
58th Governor of North Carolina
In office
January 5, 1933 January 7, 1937
Lieutenant Alexander H. Graham
Preceded by Oliver Max Gardner
Succeeded by Clyde R. Hoey
Member of the North Carolina House of Representatives
Personal details
Born
John Christoph Blucher Ehringhaus

(1882-02-05)February 5, 1882
Elizabeth City, North Carolina
DiedJuly 31, 1949(1949-07-31) (aged 67)
Raleigh, North Carolina
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s)Matilda Haughton
Children3
Alma mater University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
ProfessionLawyer, politician, farmer

John Christoph Blucher Ehringhaus (February 5, 1882 July 31, 1949) was the Governor of North Carolina from 1933 to 1937.

Governor of North Carolina head of state and of government of the U.S. state of North Carolina

The governor of North Carolina is the head of state and head of government of the U.S. state of North Carolina. The governor directs the executive branch of the government and is the commander in chief of the military forces of the state. The current governor, Democrat Roy Cooper took office on January 1, 2017, and had a public swearing-in ceremony on January 7, 2017.

Contents

Biography

He was born on February 5, 1882 in Elizabeth City, North Carolina.

Elizabeth City, North Carolina City in North Carolina, United States

Elizabeth City is a city in Pasquotank County, North Carolina, in the United States. As of the 2014 census, it had a population of 18,047. Elizabeth City is the county seat and largest city of Pasquotank County. It is the cultural, economic and educational hub of the sixteen-county Historic Albemarle region of northeastern North Carolina.

Ehringhaus attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he was a member of the Philanthropic society of the Dialectic and Philanthropic Society from 1898-1902.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill public research university in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, also known as UNC-Chapel Hill, UNC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, or simply Carolina is a public research university in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. It is the flagship of the 17 campuses of the University of North Carolina system. After being chartered in 1789, the university first began enrolling students in 1795, which also allows it to be one of three schools to claim the title of the oldest public university in the United States. Among the claimants, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the only one to have held classes and graduated students as a public university in the eighteenth century.

Ehringhaus was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (BPOE), Elizabeth City Lodge #856. He served as District Deputy Grand Exalted Ruler for the North Carolina East District of the BPOE, 1909-1910.

Governor O. Max Gardner coaxed Ehringhaus, a former state legislator and attorney, out of political retirement as his hand-picked successor. He narrowly defeated Lieutenant Governor Richard T. Fountain in a Democratic primary runoff. Fountain claimed Ehringhaus was the tool of business interests. [1]

Richard T. Fountain American politician

Richard Tillman Fountain was a North Carolina politician who served as Speaker of the North Carolina House of Representatives in 1927 and as the 16th Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina from 1929 to 1933 under Governor Oliver M. Gardner.

Two-round system voting system used to elect a single winner where a second round of voting is used if no candidate wins an absolute majority in the first round

The two-round system is a voting method used to elect a single winner, where the voter casts a single vote for their chosen candidate. However, if no candidate receives the required number of votes, then those candidates having less than a certain proportion of the votes, or all but the two candidates receiving the most votes, are eliminated, and a second round of voting is held.

Serving the state during the Great Depression, Ehringhaus encouraged the North Carolina General Assembly to create a state agency that would help rural areas of the state receive electricity services in order to revive the lagging economy. [2] He also cut state spending, successfully pushed for a three-cent sales tax, extended the school year and kept the schools open and solvent. [3]

Great Depression 20th-century worldwide economic depression

The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries, it started in 1929 and lasted until the late 1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how intensely the world's economy can decline.

North Carolina General Assembly legislature of North Carolina

The North Carolina General Assembly is the bicameral legislature of the State government of North Carolina. The legislature consists of two chambers: the Senate and the House of Representatives. The General Assembly meets in the North Carolina Legislative Building in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States.

He died on July 31, 1949.

Legacy

Asked how to say his name, he told The Literary Digest "My name is pronounced as if spelled ear'en-house." [4]

A dormitory at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Ehringhaus' alma mater (class of 1902) is named in his honor, and the Dialectic and Philanthropic Societies, of which Ehringhaus was a member, maintains a portrait in his honor.

The second longest bridge in the state of North Carolina, a 3.5-mile stretch over the Albemarle Sound, is named in honor of this former governor. [5]

Ehringhaus' grave is located in the historic Episcopal Cemetery in his hometown of Elizabeth City in Northeastern North Carolina, and the city's main thoroughfare, Ehringhaus Street, is named in his honor.

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References

  1. Christensen, Rob. The Paradox of Tar Heel Politics. 2008: UNC Press. p. 77.
  2. North Carolina Historic Sites Archived December 6, 2006, at the Wayback Machine
  3. Christensen. p. 89.
  4. Charles Earle Funk, What's the Name, Please?, Funk & Wagnalls, 1936.
  5. North Carolina Museum of History Archived July 27, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
Political offices
Preceded by
Oliver Max Gardner
Governor of North Carolina
1933–1937
Succeeded by
Clyde R. Hoey