John Campbell, 2nd Marquess of Breadalbane

Last updated


The Marquess of Breadalbane

John Campbell, 2nd Marquess of Breadalbane.jpg
The Marquess of Breadalbane
by Sir George Hayter, 1834.
Lord Chamberlain of the Household
In office
5 September 1848 21 February 1852
Monarch Victoria
Prime Minister Lord John Russell
Preceded by The Earl Spencer
Succeeded by The Marquess of Exeter
In office
15 January 1853 21 February 1858
Monarch Victoria
Prime Minister The Earl of Aberdeen
The Viscount Palmerston
Preceded by The Marquess of Exeter
Succeeded by The Earl De La Warr
Personal details
Born26 October 1796 (1796-10-26)
Dundee, Angus
Died8 November 1862 (1862-11-09) (aged 66)
Lausanne, Switzerland
Nationality British
Political party Liberal
Spouse(s)
Lady Elizabeth "Eliza" Baillie
(m. 1821;died 1861)

John Campbell, 2nd Marquess of Breadalbane, KT , PC , FRS , FSA (26 October 1796 – 8 November 1862), styled Lord Glenorchy until 1831 and as Earl of Ormelie from 1831 to 1834, was a Scottish nobleman and Liberal politician. [1]

Contents

Background and education

John Campbell, 5th Earl and 2nd Marquess of Breadalbane, by Firmin Massot John Campbell, 5th Earl and 2nd Marquess of Breadalbane, by Firmin Massot.jpg
John Campbell, 5th Earl and 2nd Marquess of Breadalbane, by Firmin Massot

Born at Dundee, Angus, Breadalbane was the son of Lieutenant-General John Campbell, 1st Marquess of Breadalbane, and Mary, daughter of David Gavin. He was educated at Eton. [2]

A bust of John Campbell made by Bertel Thorvaldsen, though it is not confirmed that it is John Campbell Lord glenorchy.JPG
A bust of John Campbell made by Bertel Thorvaldsen, though it is not confirmed that it is John Campbell

Political career

Portrait of John Campbell by George Hayter for the painting of The First Meeting of the Reformed House of Parliament in 1833 John Campbell, 2nd Marquess of Breadalbane by Sir George Hayter.jpg
Portrait of John Campbell by George Hayter for the painting of The First Meeting of the Reformed House of Parliament in 1833

Breadalbane sat as Member of Parliament for Okehampton from 1820 to 1826 [2] [3] and for Perthshire from 1832 to 1834. [2] [4] The latter year he succeeded his father as second Marquess of Breadalbane and entered the House of Lords. In 1848 he was sworn of the Privy Council [5] and appointed Lord Chamberlain of the Household [6] by Lord John Russell, a post he held until the government fell in 1852. [7] He held the same office under Lord Aberdeen between 1853 [8] and 1855 and under Lord Palmerston between 1855 and 1858. [9]

Other public appointments

A freemason, Breadalbane was Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Scotland between 1824 and 1826. [2] He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1834 [10] and made a Knight of the Thistle in 1838. [2] [11] The following year he was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Argyllshire, [12] a post he held until his death. [2] [13] In 1842 he entertained Queen Victoria and the Prince Consort at Taymouth Castle. [2] He was a supporter of the Free Church of Scotland during the Disruption of 1843. [14]

Breadalbane was also Rector of the University of Glasgow between 1840 and 1842 [14] and of Marischal College, Aberdeen, between 1843 and 1845, President of the Society of Antiquaries between 1844 and 1862 and Governor of the Bank of Scotland between 1861 and 1862. In 1861 he was sent on a special diplomatic mission to Berlin for the investiture of King William I in the Order of the Garter. [2] [15] He was appointed a Knight of the Order of the Black Eagle of Prussia at the same time. [2]

Personal life

Lord Breadalbane married Lady Elizabeth ("Eliza"), daughter of George Baillie and sister of George Baillie-Hamilton, 10th Earl of Haddington, in 1821. They had no children. She was a Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Victoria. She died in Mayfair, London, on 28 August 1861, aged 58. Lord Breadalbane survived her by just over a year and died at Lausanne, Switzerland, on 8 November 1862, aged 66. On his death the barony of Breadalbane, earldom of Ormelie and marquessate of Breadalbane became extinct. He was succeeded in the lordship of Glenorchy, viscountcy of Tay and Paintland and earldom of Breadalbane and Holland by his distant relative and namesake, John Campbell. The marquessate was revived in favour of the latter's son in 1885. [2]

The University College London, Legacies of British Slave-ownership, two projects based at UCL tracing the impact of slave-ownership on the formation of modern Britain: [16] (the ESRC-funded Legacies of British Slave-ownership project, now complete, and the ESRC and AHRC-funded Structure and significance of British Caribbean slave-ownership 17631833, running from 201315), highlight that, John Campbell, 2nd Marquis of Breadalbane, benefited from the compensation paid out following the abolition of slavery in 1833. According to the record, he benefited from a payment of £6,630,5s,6d, an approximate £562,000 in 2015, made by the government of the United Kingdom as recorded by the Slave Compensation Commission and the records held at the National Archives in London. The record containing the facts discovered can be found at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs/person/view/19525, [17] and the National Archive and the records of the Slave Compensation Commission. [18]

Related Research Articles

John Campbell may refer to:

Lord Sinclair British noble title

Lord Sinclair is a title in the Peerage of Scotland. It was created in 1449 for William Sinclair, 3rd Earl of Orkney. In 1470, Lord Orkney surrendered the earldom in return for the earldom of Caithness. In 1477, Lord Caithness wished to disinherit his eldest son from his first marriage to Lady Elizabeth Douglas, William Sinclair, who was known as "The Waster". Therefore, so that his earldom would not pass to him, he resigned the title in favour of his son from his second marriage to Marjory Sutherland, who was also named William Sinclair. However, Lord Caithness was succeeded in the lordship of Sinclair by his eldest son William Sinclair, 2nd Lord Sinclair. The latter's son Henry, the third Lord, was confirmed in the title in 1488.

Earl de Grey

Earl de Grey, of Wrest in the County of Bedford, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 25 October 1816 for Amabell Hume-Campbell, Dowager Lady Polwarth and suo jure 5th Baroness Lucas, with remainder to the heirs male of her body and in default of such issue to her sister Mary Jemima Robinson, Dowager Baroness Grantham, and the heirs male of her body. She was the eldest daughter and co-heir of Philip Yorke, 2nd Earl of Hardwicke, and Jemima Yorke, 2nd Marchioness Grey, eldest daughter of John Campbell, 3rd Earl of Breadalbane and Holland, and Lady Amabel Grey, eldest daughter of Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Kent. The marquessate of Grey had become extinct on her mother's death in 1797 and when the Grey title was revived in favour of her daughter the style "de Grey" was used to distinguish it from the earldom of Grey which had been created in 1806; the Grey family was extremely distantly related to the Earl Grey). The Countess de Grey was the widow of Alexander Hume-Campbell, Lord Polwarth, eldest son of Hugh Hume, 3rd Earl of Marchmont.

Marquess Grey was a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created on 19 May 1740 for Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Kent, with remainder to the male issue of his body and in default thereof to his granddaughter the Honourable Jemima Campbell and the heirs male of her body. The Duke of Kent died only two weeks after the creation of the marquessate when the dukedom and most of its subsidiary titles became extinct. He was succeeded in the barony of Lucas and in the marquessate of Grey according to the special remainder by his granddaughter Jemima, the second Marchioness Grey. She was the daughter of John Campbell, Lord Glenorchy, later 3rd Earl of Breadalbane and Holland, and Lady Amabel Grey, eldest daughter of the Duke of Kent. On 22 May 1740, three days after the marquessate was created, she married the Honourable Philip Yorke, later 2nd Earl of Hardwicke. They had two daughters, Lady Amabel Yorke and Lady Mary Yorke. Lady Grey died in January 1797, aged 73. As she had no sons the marquessate died with her. However, she was succeeded in the barony of Lucas by her eldest daughter, Lady Amabel, who in 1816 was created Countess de Grey in her own right.

Earl of Breadalbane and Holland

Earl of Breadalbane and Holland is a title in the Peerage of Scotland. It was created in 1681 for Sir John Campbell, 5th Baronet, of Glenorchy, who had previously been deprived of the title Earl of Caithness. He, as a principal creditor, had "acquired" the estates of George Sinclair, 6th Earl of Caithness who had died heavily in debt and without issue in 1670. Campbell was consequently created Earl of Caithness in 1673, but after much litigation and even bloodshed, George Sinclair of Keiss, second son of George, 5th Earl of Caithness, recovered the estates, and successfully petitioned parliament regarding the earldom, which was removed from Campbell. Sinclair's title was finally restored to him in 1681. Deprived by parliament of the Caithness earldom, Sir John Campbell was created Lord Glenorchy, Benederaloch, Ormelie and Weick, Viscount of Tay and Paintland, and Earl of Breadalbane and Holland on 13 August 1681, with the precedency of the former patent and with the power to nominate any of his sons by his first wife to succeed him. The titles were created with remainder to the heirs male of the son chosen to succeed him, failing which to the heirs male of his body, failing which to his own heirs male, failing which to his heirs whatsoever. The "of Holland" part of the title derived from the fact that Campbell was the husband of Lady Mary Rich, daughter of Henry Rich, 1st Earl of Holland.

George Chichester, 3rd Marquess of Donegall British politician

George Hamilton Chichester, 3rd Marquess of Donegall, styled Viscount Chichester until 1799 and Earl of Belfast between 1799 and 1844, was an Anglo-Irish landowner, courtier and politician. He served as Vice-Chamberlain of the Household from 1830 to 1834, as well as from 1838 to 1841, and as Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard between 1848 and 1852. Ennobled in his own right in 1841, he was also Lord Lieutenant of Antrim from 1841 to 1883 and was made a Knight of St Patrick in 1857.

James Graham, 4th Duke of Montrose KT, PC, styled Marquess of Graham until 1836, was a British Conservative politician.

This is a list of people who served as Lord Lieutenant of Argyllshire. The office was created on 6 May 1794 and replaced by the Lord Lieutenant of Argyll and Bute in 1975.

William Carnegie, 8th Earl of Northesk British noble

William Hopetoun Carnegie, 8th Earl of Northesk (1794–1878) was born the son of Admiral William Carnegie, 7th Earl of Northesk and Mary Ricketts on 16 October 1794. He died on 5 December 1878 at age 84.

Schomberg Kerr, 9th Marquess of Lothian British diplomat and Conservative politician

Schomberg Henry Kerr, 9th Marquess of Lothian, styled Lord Schomberg Kerr until 1870, was a British diplomat and Conservative politician. He served as Secretary for Scotland under Lord Salisbury between 1887 and 1892. He was usually styled simply as Lothian.

Henry Paget, 2nd Marquess of Anglesey British politician

Henry Paget, 2nd Marquess of Anglesey,, styled Lord Paget 1812 and 1815 and Earl of Uxbridge from 1815 to 1854, was a British peer and Whig politician. He served as Lord Chamberlain of the Household between 1839 and 1841.

Francis Conyngham, 2nd Marquess Conyngham British Army general

Francis Nathaniel Conyngham, 2nd Marquess Conyngham, KP, GCH, PC, styled Lord Francis Conyngham between 1816 and 1824 and Earl of Mount Charles between 1824 and 1832, was an Anglo-Irish soldier, courtier, politician and absentee landlord.

Gavin Campbell, 1st Marquess of Breadalbane British politician

Gavin Campbell, 1st Marquess of Breadalbane, styled Lord Glenorchy between 1862 and 1871 and known as The Earl of Breadalbane and Holland between 1871 and 1885, was a Scottish nobleman and Liberal politician.

Taymouth Castle castle in Perth and Kinross, Scotland, UK

Taymouth Castle is situated to the north-east of the village of Kenmore, Perth and Kinross in the Highlands of Scotland, in an estate which encompasses 450 acres. It lies on the south bank of the River Tay, about a mile from Loch Tay, in the heartland of the Grampian Mountains. Taymouth is bordered on two sides by mountain ranges, by Loch Tay on the third and by the confluence of the rivers Lyon and Tay on the fourth.

Charles Adam British naval officer and politician

Admiral Sir Charles Adam, FRSE KCB was a British naval officer who served during the Napoleonic Wars. He later commanded the royal yacht, Royal Sovereign, and was the Member of Parliament for Clackmannanshire and Kinross-shire. He held the office of First Naval Lord three times. In that capacity he dealt ably with the economies of a peacetime budget, provided naval support for the expulsion of Muhammad Ali's forces from Syria in 1840 and ensured technological progress continued. He was also the father of William Patrick Adam, a colonial administrator and Liberal politician.

John Campbell, 2nd Earl of Breadalbane and Holland a Scottish nobleman born in Breadalbane to John Campbell, 1st Earl of Breadalbane and Holland and Lady Mary Rich. In 1685 he married Lady Frances Cavendish, daughter of Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne and Lady Frances Pierrepont. With no issue Lady Frances died on 4 February 1690. On 23 May 1695 the Earl married a second time to Henrietta Villiers, daughter of Edward Villiers and Lady Frances Howard. They had three children including John Campbell, 3rd Earl of Breadalbane and Holland.

John Campbell, 1st Marquess of Breadalbane British Army general

Lieutenant-General John Campbell, 1st Marquess of Breadalbane FRS, known as John Campbell until 1782 and as The Earl of Breadalbane and Holland between 1782 and 1831, was a Scottish soldier and landowner.

Sir Archibald Alison, 1st Baronet historian

Sir Archibald Alison, 1st Baronet, was a Scottish advocate (attorney) and historian. He held several prominent legal appointments. He was the younger son of the Episcopalian cleric and author Archibald Alison. His elder brother was the physician and social reformer William Alison.

Mungo Campbell

Mungo Nutter Campbell of Ballimore (1785–1862) was a 19th-century Scottish merchant who served as Lord Provost of Glasgow 1824/26.

George Sinclair, 6th Earl of Caithness was a Scottish nobleman and chief of the Clan Sinclair, a Highland Scottish clan in Caithness.

References

  1. "Campbell, John (1796-1862)"  . Dictionary of National Biography . London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 thepeerage.com Sir John Campbell, 2nd Marquess of Breadalbane
  3. "leighrayment.com House of Commons: Ochil to Oxford University". Archived from the original on 16 August 2011. Retrieved 28 October 2009.
  4. "leighrayment.com House of Commons: Paddington to Platting". Archived from the original on 31 December 2010. Retrieved 28 October 2009.
  5. "No. 20895". The London Gazette . 8 September 1848. p. 3312.
  6. "No. 20894". The London Gazette . 5 September 1848. p. 3275.
  7. "No. 21297". The London Gazette . 2 March 1852. p. 670.
  8. "No. 21403". The London Gazette . 18 January 1853. p. 137.
  9. "No. 22106". The London Gazette . 2 March 1858. p. 1207.
  10. royalsociety.org Campbell; John (1796–1862); 2nd Marquess of Breadalbane
  11. leighrayment.com Knights of the Thistle
  12. "No. 19801". The London Gazette . 6 December 1839. p. 2564.
  13. leighrayment.com Peerage: Bradwell to Broxmouth
  14. 1 2 universitystory.gla.ac Biography of John Campbell 2nd Marquess of Breadalbane
  15. "No. 22489". The London Gazette . 14 March 1861. p. 1193.
  16. https://www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs/project/details/
  17. https://www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs/person/view/8659
  18. http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/search/search_results.aspx?Page=1&QueryText=slave+compensation
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Albany Savile
The Lord Dunalley
Member of Parliament for Okehampton
1820–1826
With: The Lord Dunalley 1819–24
William Trant 1824–26
Succeeded by
Sir Compton Domvile
Joseph Strutt
Preceded by
Sir George Murray
Member of Parliament for Perthshire
1832–1834
Succeeded by
Sir George Murray
Political offices
Preceded by
The Earl Spencer
Lord Chamberlain of the Household
1848–1852
Succeeded by
The Marquess of Exeter
Preceded by
The Marquess of Exeter
Lord Chamberlain of the Household
1853–1858
Succeeded by
The Earl De La Warr
Masonic offices
Preceded by
The Duke of Argyll
Grand Master of the
Grand Lodge of Scotland

1824–1826
Succeeded by
The Earl of Kinnoull
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Duke of Argyll
Lord Lieutenant of Argyllshire
1839–1862
Succeeded by
The Duke of Argyll
Academic offices
Preceded by
Sir James Graham
Rector of the University of Glasgow
1840—1842
Succeeded by
Hon. Fox Maule-Ramsay
Preceded by
Sir James McGrigor, Bt
Rector of Marischal College, Aberdeen
1843–1845
Succeeded by
Sir Archibald Alison
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
John Campbell
Marquess of Breadalbane
1834–1862
Extinct
Peerage of Scotland
Preceded by
John Campbell
Earl of Breadalbane
1834–1862
Succeeded by
John Campbell