John Cobbe

Last updated

John Cobbe in 1936 John George Cobbe.jpg
John Cobbe in 1936

John George Cobbe (1859 – 29 December 1944) was a New Zealand politician of the Liberal Party, United Party and the National Party.

Contents

Early life

Cobbe was born in King's County, Ireland, in 1859. He received his education in Tullamore and Dublin, and arrived in New Zealand in 1886. [1] He was first employed in Auckland by Smith & Caughey, and then moved to Feilding to run a general store. In 1941, he became a sheep farmer in the Waihapi Valley north of the Whanganui River. [1]

Politics and public offices

New Zealand Parliament
YearsTermElectorateParty
1928 1931 23rd Oroua United
1931 1935 24th Oroua United
1935 1936 25th Oroua United
19361938Changed allegiance to: National
1938 1943 26th Manawatu National

He represented the Oroua electorate from 1928 to 1938, [2] having stood and come second in 1922 and 1925.[ citation needed ] In the 1931 election, Cobbe was returned unopposed. [3] He then represented the Manawatu electorate from 1938 to 1943, when he retired. [2]

He was a cabinet minister from 1928 to 1935 in the United Government and the Liberal-Reform coalition Government; Minister of Defence from 1929 to 1935, Minister of Justice from 1930 to 1935, Minister of Marine from 1928 to 1930 and 1931 to 1935, Minister of Immigration from 1928 to 1930, and Minister of Industries and Commerce from 1928 to 1929 in the Ward and Forbes Ministries of the United Government. [4]

He held a large number of public offices. He was the first chairman of the Feilding Chamber of Commerce. He was chairman of directors of the Feilding Farmers' Freezing Company. From 1911 to 1929, he represented Manawatu on the Wellington Harbour Board. For a time, he was the chairman of the Harbour Boards' Association of New Zealand. [5]

In 1935, he was awarded the King George V Silver Jubilee Medal. [6]

Family and death

Cobbe married Frances Amelia Elders, the daughter of Richard Elders of Phillipstown, Feilding. [7] They had three sons, Ernest, Maurice, Richard, and one daughter. [8] One son, Ernest Cobbe, died in action in Ypres, Belgium, in 1917; [9] son, Maurice Cobbe, survived the war. [10] His wife died during the 1935 election campaign on 24 November 1935. [7] He died on 29 December 1944 at a private hospital in Palmerston North and was buried in Feilding. [1] [8]

Further reading

  • This is a facsimile (i.e. reprint) edition of the original work noted above.
  • The three editions of the above work are noted for the sake of completeness. Cobbe was the local MP for the area in 1936, and contributed a foreword for the book.
  • This is a letter from the author to Cobbe, who was Minister of Justice at the time. It is reprinted from the New Zealand Samoa Guardian of 13 November 1930 (n.p.).

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 Gustafson 1986, p. 304.
  2. 1 2 Wilson 1985, p. 189.
  3. "Wellington". Auckland Star . LXVI (280). 26 November 1935. p. 12. Retrieved 16 November 2013.
  4. Wilson 1985, pp. 80f.
  5. "Obituary". Auckland Star . LXXVI (1). 2 January 1945. p. 2. Retrieved 16 November 2013.
  6. "Official jubilee medals". Evening Post . CXIX (105). 6 May 1935. p. 4. Retrieved 2 July 2013.
  7. 1 2 "Obituary". Evening Post . CXX (127). 25 November 1935. p. 17. Retrieved 16 November 2013.
  8. 1 2 "The Hon. J. G. Cobbe". Evening Post . CXXXVIII (156). 30 December 1944. p. 8. Retrieved 16 November 2013.
  9. "Cenotaph Record". Auckland War Memorial Museum . Retrieved 16 November 2013.
  10. "Cenotaph Record". Auckland War Memorial Museum . Retrieved 16 November 2013.

Related Research Articles

1935 New Zealand general election

The 1935 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament's 25th term. It resulted in the Labour Party's first electoral victory, with Michael Joseph Savage becoming the first Labour Prime Minister. The governing coalition, consisting of the United Party and the Reform Party, suffered a major defeat, attributed by many to their handling of the Great Depression. The year after the election, United and Reform took their coalition further, merging to form the modern National Party.

1938 New Zealand general election

The 1938 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament's 26th term. It resulted in the governing Labour Party being re-elected, although the newly founded National Party gained a certain amount of ground.

25th New Zealand Parliament

The 25th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It opened on 25 March 1936, following the 1935 election. It was dissolved on 16 September 1938 in preparation for the 1938 election.

Adam Hamilton New Zealand politician

Adam Hamilton was a New Zealand politician. He was the first non-interim Leader of the National Party during its early years in Opposition.

Bunnythorpe village in Manawatū-Whanganui region, New Zealand

Bunnythorpe is a village in the Manawatū-Whanganui region of New Zealand's North Island, 10 km (6 mi) north of the region's major city, Palmerston North. Dairy farms predominate the surrounding area but the community facilities include Bunnythorpe School, with a roll of about 80 pupils as of 2010 as well as a Rugby Football Club, Country Club and several manufacturing plants. The population was 222 in the 2013 census.

Matthew Oram

Sir Matthew Henry Oram was a New Zealand politician of the National Party. He was the 13th Speaker of the House of Representatives, from 1950 to 1957.

Clyde Carr New Zealand politician

Clyde Leonard Carr was a New Zealand politician of the Labour Party, and was a minister of the Congregational Church.

Robert Alexander Wright

Robert Alexander Wright was the Mayor of Wellington from 1921 to 1925, and a New Zealand politician of the Reform Party.

Philip Skoglund

Philip Oscar Selwyn Skoglund was a New Zealand politician of the Labour Party who served as a cabinet minister.

Jack Massey (politician)

John Norman Massey, known as Jack Massey, was a New Zealand politician of the Reform Party and then the National Party.

Jeremiah Connolly was an Independent Liberal Member of Parliament for Mid-Canterbury, in the South Island of New Zealand.

Alfred Ransom

Sir Ethelbert Alfred Ransom was a New Zealand politician of the Liberal Party, then its successor the United Party, and from 1936, the National Party. He was a cabinet minister from 1928 to 1935 in the United Government, and was acting Prime Minister in 1930 and in 1935.

William Bodkin (New Zealand politician)

Sir William Alexander Bodkin was a New Zealand politician of the United Party, and from 1936, the National Party.

Lorrie Hunter

Clifford Lorrie Hunter was a New Zealand politician of the Labour Party.

Bill Endean

William Phillips Endean was a New Zealand politician, first of the Reform Party then from 1935 the National Party. He failed to be selected for the 1943 election and was the first sitting National MP with that fate, but was called to the Legislative Council in 1950 as part of the Suicide squad. He was a lawyer by trade.

Oroua was a parliamentary electorate in the Manawatu-Wanganui region of New Zealand from 1902 to 1938.

Manawatu was a parliamentary electorate in the Manawatū-Whanganui region of New Zealand that existed during three periods between 1871 and 1996.

26th New Zealand Parliament

The 26th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It was elected at the 1938 general election in October of that year.

Tom Brindle (politician)

Thomas Brindle was a British-born early activist for the New Zealand Labour Party who was jailed during World War I for speaking out against conscription. He was a member of Wellington City Council and stood for election to the House of Representatives five times. He was a member of the Legislative Council from 1936 until March 1950.

Arthur Ongley

Arthur Montague "Joe" Ongley was a New Zealand lawyer, politician, and cricket and rugby union player and administrator. Born in Oamaru, he later lived in Wellington, Napier, and Hokitika, before settling in Feilding. He excelled in a number of sports and Ongley Park in Palmerston North, used for cricket and rugby, is named for him. His most notable sporting activity was as a cricketer, and he played four first-class matches. He served as an administrator on the New Zealand Cricket Council and was the organisation's president. He was a solicitor and then barrister in Feilding, and became Crown Solicitor in Palmerston North. He was a member of the Feilding Borough council and was the town's mayor from 1913 to 1919.

References

Political offices
Preceded by
Thomas Wilford
Minister of Police
1929–1935
Succeeded by
Peter Fraser
Preceded by
Thomas Sidey
Minister of Justice
19301935
Succeeded by
Rex Mason
Preceded by
Maurice Cohen
Chair of Wellington Harbour Board
19271929
Succeeded by
John William McEwan
New Zealand Parliament
Preceded by
John Gordon Eliott
Member of Parliament for Oroua
1928–1938
Constituency abolished
Preceded by
Lorrie Hunter
Member of Parliament for Manawatu
1938–1943
Succeeded by
Matthew Oram