John Dawson Jr.

Last updated
John Dawson Jr.
16th Mayor of Charleston
In office
1806–1808
Preceded by Charles Cochran
Succeeded by Benjamin Boyd
Personal details
Born(1765-07-08)July 8, 1765
Charleston, South Carolina, British America
DiedJune 3, 1823(1823-06-03) (aged 57)
Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.
Spouse(s)
Mary Shubrick Huger
(m. 1789)
Children3
ProfessionMerchant, planter
While serving as intendant of Charleston, Dawson lived at 84 Bull Street, Charleston, South Carolina. 84 Bull.JPG
While serving as intendant of Charleston, Dawson lived at 84 Bull Street, Charleston, South Carolina.

John Dawson Jr. (July 8, 1765 – June 3, 1823) was the sixteenth intendant (mayor) of Charleston, South Carolina, serving two terms from 1806 to 1808.

Contents

Early life

Dawson was born on July 8, 1765, to John Dawson and Joanna Broughton Monck.

Career

He was elected intendant on September 15, 1806, [1] and then re-elected September 14, 1807. [2] He resigned and was replaced by Benjamin Boyd in July 1808. [3] [4] He simultaneously represented the Charleston area in the South Carolina House of Representatives from 1800 to 1808.

Personal life

In 1789, he married Mary Shubrick Huger, the daughter of Colonel John Huger, who served as the 6th mayor of Charleston. Huger was a member of the Commons House of Assembly and a member of the Council of Safety, the group that organized revolutionary movements in Charleston, [5] and his estate, known as the Hagan Plantation, comprised almost 5,000 acres. [6] Together, they were the parents of:

He died on June 3, 1823, and is buried at the Cathedral Church of St. Luke and St. Paul, Charleston, South Carolina. [7]

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References

  1. "Theodore Gaillard, jun. esq. . . ". City Gazette and Daily Advertiser. Charleston, South Carolina. September 16, 1806. p. 3. Retrieved January 26, 2014.
  2. "John Dawson, jun. Esq. . . ". City Gazette and Daily Advertiser. Charleston, South Carolina. September 15, 1807. p. 3. Retrieved January 26, 2014.
  3. "John Dawson, Jun. Esq. having resigned the Office of Intendent". City Gazette And Daily Advertiser. Charleston, South Carolina. July 13, 1808. p. 3. Retrieved January 23, 2014.
  4. "Benjamin Boyd, Esq". City Gazette And Daily Advertiser. Charleston, South Carolina. July 23, 1808. p. 3. Retrieved January 23, 2014.
  5. Leland, Jack (May 28, 1984). "Many Owners, Changes Characterize Cypress Barony". News & Courier. Charleston, South Carolina. pp. 6–C. Retrieved January 24, 2014.
  6. Rainey, Anne Edens (July 5, 1999). "Cooperative effort produced conservation easement". Post & Courier. Charleston, South Carolina. pp. 13–A. Retrieved January 24, 2014.
  7. "John Dawson, Jr". Halsey Map Project. Preservation Society of Charleston. Retrieved January 26, 2014.
Preceded by
Charles Cochran
Mayor of Charleston, South Carolina
1806–1808
Succeeded by
Benjamin Boyd