John DeCuir

Last updated
John DeCuir
BornJune 4, 1918
DiedOctober 29, 1991(1991-10-29) (aged 73)
OccupationArt director
Years active1942–1984
ChildrenJohn DeCuir Jr.

John DeCuir (June 4, 1918 – October 29, 1991) was a Hollywood art director and production designer known for his elaborate set designs that were illustrated with his own watercolor paintings. [1]

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DeCuir studied at the Chouinard Art School, joined Universal in the late 1930s, and by the mid-1940s was designing sets. In 1949, he signed with 20th Century Fox where he worked on productions with elaborate sets. These included dramatic material such as The House on Telegraph Hill (1951), musicals including There's No Business Like Show Business 1954), and comedy Ghostbusters (1984). DeCuir earned eleven Oscar nominations, winning three: The King and I (1956), Cleopatra (1963), and Hello, Dolly! (1969).

His son, John DeCuir Jr. is also a production designer.

Partial filmography

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