John Dowden

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The Right Reverend

John Dowden

DD, LLD
Bishop of Edinburgh
John Dowden.JPG
Church Scottish Episcopal Church
Diocese Edinburgh
Elected1886
In office1886-1910
Predecessor Henry Cotterill
Successor Somerset Walpole
Orders
Ordination1865
Consecration1886
Personal details
Born(1840-06-29)June 29, 1840
Cork, Ireland
DiedJanuary 30, 1910(1910-01-30) (aged 69)
Edinburgh, Scotland
Buried Dean Cemetery
Nationality Irish
Denomination Anglican
SpouseLouisa Jones
Children6
Alma mater Trinity College Dublin

John Dowden DD LLD (29 June 1840 30 January 1910) was an Irish-born bishop and ecclesiastical historian. He served in the Scottish Episcopal Church as the Bishop of Edinburgh.

Doctor of Divinity advanced or honorary academic degree in divinity

Doctor of Divinity is an advanced or honorary academic degree in divinity.

Irish people Ethnic group with Celtic and other roots, native to the island of Ireland, with shared history and culture

The Irish are a Celtic nation and ethnic group native to the island of Ireland, who share a common Irish ancestry, identity and culture. Ireland has been inhabited for about 12,500 years according to archaeological studies. For most of Ireland's recorded history, the Irish have been primarily a Gaelic people. Viking invasions of Ireland during the 8th to 11th centuries established the cities of Dublin, Wexford, Waterford, Cork and Limerick. Anglo-Normans conquered parts of Ireland in the 12th century, while England's 16th/17th-century (re)conquest and colonisation of Ireland brought a large number of English and Lowland Scots people to parts of the island, especially the north. Today, Ireland is made up of the Republic of Ireland and the smaller Northern Ireland. The people of Northern Ireland hold various national identities including British, Irish, Northern Irish or some combination thereof.

The Bishop of Edinburgh is the ordinary of the Scottish Episcopal Diocese of Edinburgh.

Contents

Life

He was born in Cork on 29 June 1840, as the fifth of five children of John Wheeler Dowden and Alicia Bennett. His famous brother was the poet, professor and literary critic Edward Dowden. Although his father was Presbyterian, John followed his mother by becoming an Anglican, although he attended both churches in his youth. When he was sixteen he became a student at Queen's College, Cork as a medical student. John began encountering health problems, problems which made it difficult to pursue his original career. In 1858, while contemplating a religious career, he enrolled at Trinity College, Dublin. He graduated in 1864 and was ordained as a deacon, moving to Sligo. In the same year he married, wedding a woman named Louisa Jones, by whom he would eventually father six children. John was ordained as a priest in 1865, and moved through a variety of positions slowly rising in prestige. John continued his studies and received a Bachelor of Divinity (BD) degree from Trinity College.

Cork (city) City in Munster, Ireland

Cork is a city in south-west Ireland, in the province of Munster, which had a population of 125,657 in 2016.

Edward Dowden 19th/20th-century Irish critic and poet

Edward Dowden, was an Irish critic and poet.

Sligo Town in Connacht, Ireland

Sligo is a coastal seaport and the county town of County Sligo, Ireland, within the western province of Connacht. With a population of approximately 20,000 in 2016, it is the second largest urban centre in the West of Ireland, with only Galway being larger. The Sligo Borough District constitutes 61% (38,581) of the county's population of 63,000.

13 Learmonth Terrace, Edinburgh 13 Learmonth Terrace, Edinburgh.jpg
13 Learmonth Terrace, Edinburgh
The grave of Bishop John Dowden, Dean Cemetery, Edinburgh The grave of Bishop John Dowden, Dean Cemetery, Edinburgh.jpg
The grave of Bishop John Dowden, Dean Cemetery, Edinburgh

In 1886, he was consecrated as an Episcopalian bishop in Scotland and served in St Mary's Episcopal Cathedral in Edinburgh's West End and served this role until death. [1] In the late 19th century he lived at 10 Gillsland Road in the Merchiston district of Edinburgh [2] but in his later years he lived at 13 Learmonth Terrace, a substantial Victorian terraced house, west of the cathedral. [3]

Scotland Country in Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Scotland is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. Sharing a border with England to the southeast, Scotland is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, by the North Sea to the northeast and by the Irish Sea to the south. In addition to the mainland, situated on the northern third of the island of Great Britain, Scotland has over 790 islands, including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.

Edinburgh Capital city in Scotland

Edinburgh is the capital city of Scotland and one of its 32 council areas. Historically part of the county of Midlothian, it is located in Lothian on the Firth of Forth's southern shore.

He died in Edinburgh on 30 January 1910 and is buried in the Victorian north extension of Dean Cemetery in western Edinburgh. He is buried with his wife Louisa and son John Wheeler Howden LLD (1866-1936).

Dean Cemetery historic Victorian cemetery in western Edinburgh

The Dean Cemetery is a historically important Victorian cemetery north of the Dean Village, west of Edinburgh city centre, in Scotland. It lies between Queensferry Road and the Water of Leith, bounded on its east side by Dean Path and on its west by the Dean Gallery. A 20th-century extension lies detached from the main cemetery to the north of Ravelston Terrace. The main cemetery is accessible through the main gate on its east side, through a "grace and favour" access door from the grounds of Dean Gallery and from Ravelston Terrace. The modern extension is only accessible at the junction of Dean Path and Queensferry Road.

His memorial in St Marys Cathedral was designed by Sir Robert Lorimer in 1911. [4]

Robert Lorimer Scottish architect

Sir Robert Stodart Lorimer, KBE was a prolific Scottish architect and furniture designer noted for his sensitive restorations of historic houses and castles, for new work in Scots Baronial and Gothic Revival styles, and for promotion of the Arts and Crafts movement.

Scholarly work

As a scholar, he was author of many works of thorough scholarship, including The Medieval Church in Scotland: its constitution, organisation and law (1910) and The Bishops of Scotland: being notes on the lives of all the bishops, under each of the sees, prior to the Reformation (1912). Both were published posthumously by James Maclehose and Sons, Glasgow. The former, although extremely dated, is still regarded as one of the main starting points in medieval Scottish ecclesiastical history, and the latter remains to this day one of the most comprehensive guides to medieval Scottish episcopal prosopography. An earlier work, The Workmanship of the Prayer Book: In Its Literary and Liturgical Aspects, (London: Methuen, 1899) remains an indispensable analysis of the background to and ethos of the Book of Common Prayer.

In historical studies, prosopography is an investigation of the common characteristics of a historical group, whose individual biographies may be largely untraceable, by means of a collective study of their lives, in multiple career-line analysis. Prosopographical research has the goal of learning about patterns of relationships and activities through the study of collective biography; it collects and analyses statistically relevant quantities of biographical data about a well-defined group of individuals. This makes it a valuable technique for studying many pre-modern societies.

Dowden gave the Rhind lectures in 1901, on "The Constitution, Organisation, and Law of the Mediaeval Church in Scotland".

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References

  1. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  2. Edinburgh and Leith Post Office Directory 1894-95
  3. Edinburgh and Leith Post Office Directory, 1908-9
  4. Dictionary of Scottish Architects: Robert Lorimer

Further reading

Religious titles
Preceded by
Henry Cotterill
Bishop of Edinburgh
1886–1910
Succeeded by
Somerset Walpole