John Drayton

Last updated
John Drayton II
JohnDrayton.JPG
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina
In office
May 7, 1812 November 27, 1822
Appointed by James Madison
Preceded by Thomas Bee
Succeeded by Thomas Lee
40th Governor of South Carolina
In office
December 10, 1808 December 8, 1810
Lieutenant Frederick Nance
Preceded by Charles Pinckney
Succeeded by Henry Middleton
In office
January 23, 1800 December 8, 1802
Lieutenant Richard Winn
Preceded by Edward Rutledge
Succeeded by James Burchill Richardson
18th Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina
In office
December 18, 1798 January 23, 1800
GovernorEdward Rutledge
Preceded by Robert Anderson
Succeeded byRichard Winn
Personal details
Born
John Drayton II

(1766-06-22)June 22, 1766
Charleston,
Province of South Carolina,
British America
DiedNovember 27, 1822(1822-11-27) (aged 56)
Charleston, South Carolina
Political party Democratic-Republican
Education Inner Temple (read law)

John Drayton II (June 22, 1766 – November 27, 1822) was Governor of South Carolina and a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina.

Contents

Education and career

Born on June 22, 1766, in Charleston, Province of South Carolina, British America, to William Henry Drayton and Dorothy Golightly, Drayton read law in 1788 at the Inner Temple in London, England. He engaged in private practice in Charleston, South Carolina in 1788, from 1789 to 1794, from 1796 to 1798, and from 1811 to 1812. He was a warden (assistant to the intendant) for Charleston starting in 1788. He was a rice planter in Georgetown County, South Carolina from 1794 to 1822. He was a member of the South Carolina House of Representatives from 1792 to 1796. He was Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina from 1798 to 1800. He was Governor of South Carolina from 1801 to 1803, and from 1809 to 1810. He was the Intendant (Mayor) of Charleston from 1803 to 1805. He was a member of the South Carolina Senate from 1805 to 1808. [1] He was a member of the Democratic-Republican Party. [2]

Federal judicial service

Drayton was nominated by President James Madison on May 4, 1812, to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina vacated by Judge Thomas Bee. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on May 7, 1812, and received his commission the same day. His service terminated on November 27, 1822, due to his death in Charleston. [1]

Notable case

Drayton issued perhaps the earliest judicial decision holding that, under the laws of the United States, slaves captured in time of war on enemy ships could not be claimed as property. [3] [4]

Books

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References

  1. 1 2 John Drayton at the Biographical Directory of Federal Judges , a public domain publication of the Federal Judicial Center .
  2. 1 2 3 4 "John Drayton: Learn about South Carolina's Governor from 1800 to 1802 and 1808 to 1810". www.sciway.net.
  3. Moore, George H. (1866). Notes on the History of Slavery in Massachusetts. New York: D. Appleton & Co. p.  162 . Retrieved 13 April 2016. Almeida.
  4. Almeida v. Certain Slaves, 1 Fed. Cas. 538 (D. S. C. 1814).

Further sources

Political offices
Preceded by
Robert Anderson
Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina
1798–1800
Succeeded by
Richard Winn
Preceded by
Edward Rutledge
Governor of South Carolina
1800–1802
Succeeded by
James Burchill Richardson
Preceded by
David Deas
Mayor of Charleston, South Carolina
1803–1804
Succeeded by
Thomas Winstanley
Preceded by
Charles Pinckney
Governor of South Carolina
1808–1810
Succeeded by
Henry Middleton
Legal offices
Preceded by
Thomas Bee
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina
1812–1822
Succeeded by
Thomas Lee