John Drebinger

Last updated
John Drebinger
BornMarch 23, 1891
DiedOctober 22, 1979(1979-10-22) (aged 88)
Nationality American
OccupationBaseball reporter for The New York Times

John "Drebby" Drebinger (March 23, 1891 – October 22, 1979) was an American sportswriter for The New York Times from 1923 to 1964. He graduated from Curtis High School on Staten Island and went to work for the Staten Island Advance in 1911. [1] [2] In 1973, Drebinger was honored by the Baseball Writers' Association of America with the J. G. Taylor Spink Award for distinguished baseball writing. [3] Recipients of the Spink Award are recognized at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in what is commonly referred to as the "writers wing" of the Hall of Fame. [4] In October 1979, he died at a nursing home in North Carolina. [5]

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<i>The New York Times</i> Daily broadsheet newspaper based in New York City

The New York Times is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership. Founded in 1851, the paper has won 127 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper. The Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation and 3rd in the U.S.

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References

  1. "John Drebinger Retires Today After Forty Years with the Times" (PDF). The New York Times. April 1, 1964.
  2. "John Drebinger: Legendary Sportswriter began career on Staten Island; helped turn a newspaper around with compelling writing and unique publicity stunt". Secret Staten Island. February 2011. Archived from the original on 2011-02-23.
  3. "1973 J. G. Taylor Spink Award Winner John Drebinger". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.
  4. Jim Odenkirk (July 23, 2009). "Henry P. Edwards: Making a Case for His Induction into J.G. Taylor Spink's Writers Wing of the Hall". SABR. Archived from the original on September 29, 2011.
  5. "John Drebinger, 88, Reporter for Times: Covered Baseball for 40 Years and Saw All 203 World Series Games from 1929-1963" (PDF). The New York Times. October 24, 1979.