John Findlay (New Zealand politician)

Last updated

  • Findlay, John George (1897), The degeneration of liberalism in New Zealand, Wellington, [N.Z.]: Evening Post Printing House
  • Findlay, John George (1907), The land question: the case for the lease-in-perpetuity settler: a valuable contribution, n.p.: Watkins, Tyer & Tolan Ltd., Printers
  • Findlay, John George (1907), The Land Bill: Mr. Massey's criticisms answered , Dunedin, [N.Z.]: Evening Star Co.
  • Findlay, John George (1908), Humbugs and homilies, Christchurch, [N.Z.]: Whitcombe & Tombs
  • Findlay, John George (1908), Labour and the Arbitration Act: a speech, Wellington, [N.Z.]: New Zealand Times
  • Findlay, John George (1909), Our man in the street: the origin, operation and character of public opinion, Dunedin, [N.Z.]: Evening Star Co.
  • Findlay, John George (1910), Legal liberty: a lecture delivered by the Hon. Dr. Findlay, Attorney-General of New Zealand, before the Philosophical Society, Palmerston North, on Thursday, 21 April 1910, Wellington, [N.Z.]: New Zealand Times
  • Findlay, John George (c. 1910), Travels with a Royal Commission , Wellington, [N.Z.]: New Zealand Times
  • Findlay, John George (1912), The Imperial Conference of 1911 from within, London, [England]: Constable & Company Ltd.
  • Findlay, John George (1921), "Japanese immigration: a colonial protest", The Whitehall Gazette (March): 10–13

Notes

  1. "Sir John Findlay's career". Evening Post. 9 March 1917. p. 8. Retrieved 22 March 2014.
  2. 1 2 3 4 Hall, Geoffrey G. "Findlay, John George". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 4 April 2011.
  3. "New Zealand General Election, 1902". 29 June 1903. Retrieved 15 May 2013.
  4. Paterson, Donald Edgar (1966), "Findlay, the Hon. Sir John George", An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand, edited by A. H. McLintock, retrieved 10 May 2008
  5. Wilson 1985, p. 153.
  6. 1 2 3 Wilson 1985, p. 74.
  7. "No. 28505". The London Gazette (Supplement). 19 June 1911. p. 4593.
  8. Hamer 1988, pp. 339f.
  9. Wilson 1985, p. 196.

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References

Sir John Findlay
John George Findlay.jpg
17th Minister of Justice
In office
6 January 1909 26 December 1911
Political offices
Preceded by Attorney-General
19061911
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister of Justice
19091911
Succeeded by
Minister of Police
1909–1911
New Zealand Parliament
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Hawkes Bay
1917–1919
Succeeded by