John Gorton

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John Gorton
JohnGorton1968.jpg
Gorton in January 1968
19th Prime Minister of Australia
In office
10 January 1968 10 March 1971
  1. In Australia, ministers are drawn from both the House of Representatives and the Senate. To allow the Opposition to ask questions about all governmental actions in both houses, some ministers assume responsibility for portfolios held by ministers from the other chamber.
  2. His formal title was "Minister in charge of Commonwealth Activities in Education and Research under the Prime Minister". [54]
  3. There was no separate education department at the time, with the portfolio instead handled by the Commonwealth Education Office within the Prime Minister's Department. [55]
  4. Between 1963 and 1966, the number of Commonwealth scholarships on offer rose from 4,701 to 8,069, an increase of 72 percent, while the number of new university entrants rose from 17,311 to 24,196, an increase of 40 percent. Total federal funding of education rose by 77 percent from the 1964–65 budget to the 1967–68 budget. [59]

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References

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  2. 1 2 HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES HOMOSEXUALITY SPEECH, Hansard, 18 October 1973.
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  107. Sullivan, Jane (17 April 2015). "Lisa Gorton: prize-winning poet writes her first novel". The Sydney Morning Herald . Retrieved 27 September 2022.Lock-red-alt-2.svgsubscription: the source is only accessible via a paid subscription ("paywall").
  108. It's an Honour Archived 26 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine – Companion of Honour
  109. It's an Honour Archived 26 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine – Knight Grand Cross of the Order of St Michael and St George
  110. It's an Honour Archived 26 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine – Companion of the Order of Australia
  111. It's an Honour Archived 26 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine – Centenary Medal
  112. New CR Diesel Named after Prime Minister Railway Transportation March 1970 page 5

Further reading

Parliament of Australia
Preceded by Member for Higgins
1968–1975
Succeeded by
Political offices
Preceded by Minister for the Navy
1958–1963
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister for Works
1963–1967
Succeeded by
Minister for the Interior
1963–1964
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister in charge of the Commonwealth
Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

1962–1963
Absorbed into next
New title Minister in charge of Commonwealth Activities
in Education and Research

1963–1966
Succeeded by
Minister for Education and Science
1966–1968
Preceded by Prime Minister of Australia
1968–1971
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister for Defence
1971
Succeeded by
Party political offices
Preceded by Leader of the Liberal Party of Australia
1968–1971
Succeeded by
Preceded by Deputy Leader of the Liberal Party of Australia
1971
Succeeded by
Preceded by Leader of the Liberal Party in the Senate
1967–1968
Succeeded by