John Gregory (settler)

Last updated
John Gregory
Deputy of the
General Court
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk [1]
In office
1659–1695
Preceded by Matthew Canfield
Succeeded by Samuel Hayes
Personal details
Bornc. 1612
Nottinghamshire, England [2]
DiedAugust 15, 1689 [2]
Norwalk, Connecticut Colony [2]
Resting place East Norwalk Historical Cemetery, Norwalk, Connecticut
Spouse(s)Sarah St. John (m. 1635) [2]
ChildrenJohn Gregory, Jachin Gregory, Judah Gregory, Joseph Gregory, Thomas Gregory, Phoebe Gregory Benedict (m. John Benedict), Sarah Gregory [3]
Residence New Haven Colony,
Norwalk, Connecticut Colony
Occupationshoemaker, tanner

John Gregory (also John Griggorie) (1612 – August 15, 1689) was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He was a deputy of the General Court of the Connecticut Colony in the sessions of October 1659, October 1662, May 1663, May 1665, October 1667, May 1668, May and October 1669, October 1670, October 1671, May 1674, May 1675, October 1677, May 1679, October 1680, May 1681, October 1695.

Settler person who has migrated to an area and established permanent residence there

A settler is a person who has migrated to an area and established a permanent residence there, often to colonize the area. Settlers are generally from a sedentary culture, as opposed to nomads who share and rotate their settlements with little or no concept of individual land ownership. Settlements are often built on land already claimed or owned by another group. Many times settlers are backed by governments or large countries. They also sometimes leave in search of religious freedom.

Norwalk, Connecticut City in Connecticut, United States

Norwalk is a U.S. city located in southwestern Connecticut, in southern Fairfield County, on the northern shore of Long Island Sound. Norwalk lies within both the New York metropolitan area as well as the Bridgeport metropolitan area.

Connecticut state of the United States of America

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the United States. As of the 2010 Census, it has the highest per-capita income, Human Development Index (0.962), and median household income in the United States. It is bordered by Rhode Island to the east, Massachusetts to the north, New York to the west, and Long Island Sound to the south. Its capital is Hartford and its most populous city is Bridgeport. It is part of New England, although portions of it are often grouped with New York and New Jersey as the Tri-state area. The state is named for the Connecticut River which approximately bisects the state. The word "Connecticut" is derived from various anglicized spellings of an Algonquian word for "long tidal river".

Contents

Emigration and residence in New Haven

He was born in Nottinghamshire, England in 1612, the son of Henry Gregory [3] and Mary Goody. He emigrated with his father in the early 1630s. He is known to have lived in the New Haven Colony between 1639 and 1646. In 1644 he was admitted to the New Haven Court. His sons Joseph and Thomas were born in New Haven in 1646 and 1648, respectively.

Nottinghamshire County of England

Nottinghamshire is a county in the East Midlands region of England, bordering South Yorkshire to the north-west, Lincolnshire to the east, Leicestershire to the south, and Derbyshire to the west. The traditional county town is Nottingham, though the county council is based at County Hall, Nottinghamshire in West Bridgford in the borough of Rushcliffe, at a site facing Nottingham over the River Trent.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

New Haven Colony English possession in North America between 1639 and 1665

The New Haven Colony was a small English colony in North America from 1637 to 1664 in what is now the state of Connecticut.

Settlement of Norwalk

Roger Ludlow purchased the land that would become Norwalk in 1640. Ludlow contracted with fourteen men for the original planting of Norwalk. In 1649, Richard Olmsted and Nathaniel Ely became the first two settlers. One of the fourteen was Richard Webb, whose wife was John Gregory's sister.

Roger Ludlow English lawyer, founder and deputy governor of Connecticut Colony

Roger Ludlow (1590–1664) was an English lawyer, magistrate, military officer, and colonist. He was active in the founding of the Colony of Connecticut, and helped draft laws for it and the nearby Massachusetts Bay Colony. Under his and John Mason's direction, Boston's first fortification, later known as Castle William and then Fort Independence was built on Castle Island in Boston harbor. Frequently at odds with his peers, he eventually also founded Fairfield and Norwalk before leaving New England entirely.

Richard Olmsted was a founding settler of both Hartford and Norwalk, Connecticut. He served in the General Court of the Connecticut Colony in the sessions of May 1653, October 1654, May 1658, October 1660, May 1662, May and October 1663, May and October 1664, October 1665, May and October 1666, May 1667, May and October 1668, May 1669, May 1671, and May 1679.

Nathaniel Ely was a founding settler of Hartford and Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Court of the Connecticut Colony from Norwalk in the October 1656 session.

John Gregory lived in the East Norwalk section of Norwalk, along what is now East Avenue. He was an active member of the community, holding office almost continuously during his life in Norwalk.

He is listed on the Founders Stone bearing the names of the founding settlers of Norwalk in the East Norwalk Historical Cemetery.

History of Norwalk, Connecticut

The history of Norwalk, Connecticut ranges from pre-contact cultures and Native Americans to the 21st century.

East Norwalk Historical Cemetery

Established in 1655, the East Norwalk Historical Cemetery is Norwalk's oldest cemetery, and many of the area's first settlers are buried there. The cemetery is owned and maintained by the Third Taxing District, formally known as the East Norwalk Fire District of the Town of Norwalk, and before that it was known as the Down Town School District. Triangle shaped and surrounded clockwise by Gregory Boulevard, Cemetery Street and East Avenue it is situated in the neighborhood of East Norwalk 41°6′9.22″N73°24′11.95″W.

Settlement of Newark

When the New Haven Colony was absorbed into the Connecticut Colony in 1662, many of the Puritan settlers were displeased at the fact that the new colony's constitution didn't include certain restrictions on non-Puritan settlers. [4] The New Haven colonists believed that only members of the Puritan church should be allowed to vote, and that only the children of church members could be baptized. [4]

Connecticut Colony English, from 1707, British, possession in North America between 1636 and 1776

The Connecticut Colony or Colony of Connecticut, originally known as the Connecticut River Colony or simply the River Colony, was an English colony in North America that became the state of Connecticut. It was organized on March 3, 1636 as a settlement for a Puritan congregation, and the English permanently gained control of the region in 1637 after struggles with the Dutch. The colony was later the scene of a bloody war between the colonists and Pequot Indians known as the Pequot War. Connecticut Colony played a significant role in the establishment of self-government in the New World with its refusal to surrender local authority to the Dominion of New England, an event known as the Charter Oak incident which occurred at Jeremy Adams' inn and tavern.

In response, the New Haven Puritans sent Robert Treat and John Gregory to meet with Philip Carteret, the new Royal Governor of New Jersey. The group chose the present day site of Newark for a new settlement. In May 1666, the Puritan settlers, led by Treat, purchased the land directly from the Hackensack Indians. [4]

Robert Treat was an American colonial leader, militia officer and governor of the Connecticut Colony between 1683 and 1698 and the founder of Newark, New Jersey.

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References

Preceded by
Matthew Canfield
Deputy of the
General Court
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk

October 1659
Succeeded by
Matthew Canfield
Preceded by
Richard Olmsted
Deputy of the
General Court
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk

October 1662, May 1663
With: Matthew Canfield
Succeeded by
Matthew Canfield
Richard Olmsted
Preceded by
Matthew Canfield
Richard Olmsted
Deputy of the
Connecticut General Assembly
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk

May 1665
Succeeded by
Matthew Canfield
Richard Olmsted
Preceded by
Richard Olmsted
Deputy of the
Connecticut General Assembly
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk

October 1667, May 1668
With: Walter Hoyt,
Richard Olmsted
Succeeded by
Richard Olmsted
Walter Hoyt
Preceded by
Richard Olmsted
Walter Hoyt
Deputy of the
Connecticut General Assembly
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk

May and October 1669
With: Richard Olmsted,
John Douglas
Succeeded by
Walter Hoyt
Thomas Benedict
Preceded by
Walter Hoyt
Thomas Benedict
Deputy of the
Connecticut General Assembly
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk

October 1670
With: Daniel Kellogg
Succeeded by
Richard Olmsted
Walter Hoyt
Preceded by
Richard Olmsted
Walter Hoyt
Deputy of the
Connecticut General Assembly
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk

October 1671
With: John Bowton
Succeeded by
Walter Hoyt
Daniel Kellogg
Preceded by
Walter Hoyt
John Bowton
Deputy of the
Connecticut General Assembly
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk

May 1674
With: John Bowton
Succeeded by
Walter Hoyt
Daniel Kellogg
Preceded by
Walter Hoyt
Daniel Kellogg
Deputy of the
Connecticut General Assembly
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk

May 1675
With: Thomas Benedict,
John Bowton
Succeeded by
Daniel Kellogg
Preceded by
Daniel Kellogg
Deputy of the
Connecticut General Assembly
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk

October 1677
With: John Bowton
Succeeded by
John Bowton
Walter Hoyt
Preceded by
Mark Sension
John Platt
Deputy of the
Connecticut General Assembly
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk

May 1679
With: Richard Olmsted
Succeeded by
Daniel Kellogg
John Bowton
Preceded by
Daniel Kellogg
John Bowton
Deputy of the
Connecticut General Assembly
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk

October 1680, May 1681
With: John Platt,
John Bowton
Succeeded by
Walter Hoyt
John Platt
Preceded by
Samuel Hayes
Jachin Gregory
Deputy of the
Connecticut General Assembly
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk

October 1695
Succeeded by
Samuel Hayes