John Gunner

Last updated

John Gunner
Personal information
Full nameJohn Hugh Gunner
Born(1884-05-17)17 May 1884
Bishops Waltham, Hampshire, England
Died9 August 1918(1918-08-09) (aged 34)
Kemmel, Flanders, Belgium
BattingRight-handed
BowlingRight-arm medium
Relations Charles Gunner (father)
Domestic team information
YearsTeam
19061907 Hampshire
Career statistics
Competition FC
Matches6
Runs scored65
Batting average 8.12
100s/50s/
Top score32
Balls bowled
Wickets
Bowling average
5 wickets in innings
10 wickets in match
Best bowling
Catches/stumpings 4/
Source: Cricinfo, 7 January 2010

Captain John Hugh Gunner (17 May 1884 9 August 1918) was an English first-class cricketer. He was educated at Marlborough College, where he represented the college team from 1901 to 1902, captaining the college in 1902. Later Gunner was educated at Trinity College, Oxford where he represented the college cricket team.

Contents

Gunner represented Hampshire in six first-class matches, the first of which came in 1906 against the touring West Indians. Gunner's final first-class match came in 1907 against Leicestershire.

Gunner fought in the First World War with the Hampshire Regiment, where he held the rank of captain. Gunner died of wounds on 9 August 1918, at Kemmel, Belgium. He was buried at La Clytte Military Cemetery, near Ypres. [1]

Family

Gunner's father, Charles Gunner represented Hampshire in a single first-class match in 1878.

Related Research Articles

R. E. Foster English cricketer

Reginald Erskine Foster, nicknamed Tip Foster, commonly designated R. E. Foster in sporting literature, was an English first-class cricketer and football player. He is the only man to have captained England at both sports.

Greville Thomas Scott Stevens was an English amateur cricketer who played for Middlesex, Oxford University and England. A leg-spin and googly bowler and attacking batsman, he captained England in one Test match, in South Africa in 1927. He was widely regarded as one of the leading amateur cricketers of his generation who, because of his commitments outside cricket, was unable to fulfil his potential and left the game early.

Admiral Sir George Hamilton D'Oyly Lyon, KCB was a distinguished Royal Navy officer as well as an English sportsman who played first-class cricket and represented the England national rugby union team.

Hugh Orr was an Australian-born English first-class cricketer.

Hugh Glennie Bignell was an Indian born English Army officer and first-class cricketer. Bignell was a right-handed batsman who bowled right-arm fast.

Edward Lee Ede was an English first-class cricketer. Ede was a right-handed batsman who bowled right-arm underarm.

Herbert Denys Hake OBE was an English cricketer. Hake was a right-handed batsman who played as an occasional wicketkeeper.

Charles Henry Ridding was an English cricketer. He was a right-handed batsman who occasionally played as a wicketkeeper.

Charles Vernon Eccles was an English first-class cricketer. He was a right-handed batsman who bowled Underarm slow, although with which arm he bowled is unknown.

Roland Barton 'Bill' Proud was an English first-class cricketer. Proud was a right-handed batsman who bowled right-arm medium pace.

Lieutenant Colonel Guy Newcombe Bignell was an English cricketer and Indian Army officer. Bignell was a right-handed batsman who bowled right-arm medium pace.

John St John Frederick was an English first-class cricketer who played as a right-handed batsman and a right-arm roundarm fast bowler.

William Frederick Light was an English first-class cricketer. Light was a left-handed batsman who bowled right-arm fast and slow left-arm orthodox spin. He was educated at Marlborough College.

Colonel John Rooke Rawlence OBE was an English first-class cricketer. Rawlence was a right-handed batsman.

Alfred Henry Evans was an English first-class cricketer. He was a right-handed batsman who bowled right-arm fast-medium.

Major-General James Spens, was an English first-class cricketer and an officer in the British Army. Spens began playing cricket whilst at school, and after joining the Army played for Hampshire and the Marylebone Cricket Club in the 1880s. He briefly returned to first-class cricket in 1897-98, again for Hampshire. During the Second Boer War, he led an infantry battalion and a mobile column, then later commanded a military district in India and a Territorial division in the United Kingdom. He retired shortly before the outbreak of the First World War, when he returned to service, commanding the 12th (Eastern) Division, then a training depot and a military district in Egypt.

Major Lionel Gough Arbuthnot, MBE was a banker and soldier who also played first-class cricket on a tour of the West Indies in 1901–02.

George Henry Longman was an English first-class cricketer. Longman was a right-handed batsman who played occasionally as a wicketkeeper.

Arthur William Ridley was an English first-class cricketer. Ridley was a right-handed batsman who bowled right-arm underarm medium pace. He also played occasionally as a wicketkeeper.

John Douglas Percival was an English cricketer who featured as a right-hand batsman in three first-class cricket matches between 1922 and 1923; one match saw him represent Gloucestershire, in the other two he batted for Oxford University. Outside of first-class cricket, he represented numerous clubs and teams including Radley College and Westminster School while a student there, and played for the Marylebone Cricket Club in 1930. During the Second World War he played for the Royal Army Service Corps. Born in Kensington, he died in Roehampton.

References

  1. "Casualty details: Captain Gunner, John Hugh". CWGC . Retrieved 24 June 2019.