John I, Duke of Bourbon

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John I, Duke of Bourbon
Jan Bourb1.jpg
Born 1381
Died 1434 (aged 5253)
London
Noble family Bourbon
Spouse(s) Marie, Duchess of Auvergne
Father Louis II, Duke of Bourbon
Mother Anne of Auvergne

Jean de Bourbon (13811434) was Duke of Bourbon, from 1410 to his death and Duke of Auvergne since 1416. He was the eldest son of Louis II and Anne of Auvergne. Through his mother, John inherited the County of Forez.

Duke of Bourbon

Duke of Bourbon is a title in the peerage of France. It was created in the first half of the 14th century for the eldest son of Robert of France, Count of Clermont and Beatrice of Burgundy, heiress of the lordship of Bourbon. In 1416, with the death of John of Valois, the Dukes of Bourbon were simultaneously Dukes of Auvergne.

Louis II, Duke of Bourbon Duke of Bourbon

Louis de Bourbon, called the Good, son of Peter de Bourbon and Isabella de Valois, was the third Duke of Bourbon.

Anne of Auvergne French noblewoman

Anne of Auvergne also known as Anna d'Auvergne was Sovereign Dauphine of Auvergne and Countess of Forez as well as Dame de Mercoeur from 1400 and 1417. She was also Duchess of Bourbon by marriage to Louis II, Duke of Bourbon.

During the Armagnac–Burgundian Civil War he took sides against the Burgundians. John was captured at the Battle of Agincourt and died a prisoner in London, in spite of the payment of several ransoms, and promises to support the king of England as king of France. [1]

Armagnac–Burgundian Civil War French civil war between the Armagnac and Burgundian factions

The Armagnac–Burgundian Civil War was a conflict between two cadet branches of the French royal family — the House of Orléans and the House of Burgundy from 1407 to 1435. It began during a lull in the Hundred Years' War against the English and overlapped with the Western Schism of the papacy.

Battle of Agincourt English victory in the Hundred Years War

The Battle of Agincourt was one of the greatest English victories in the Hundred Years' War. It took place on 25 October 1415 near Azincourt in the County of Saint-Pol, in northern France. England's unexpected victory against a numerically superior French army boosted English morale and prestige, crippled France, and started a new period in the war during which the English began enjoying great military successes.

London Capital of the United Kingdom

London is the capital and largest city of both England and the United Kingdom. Standing on the River Thames in the south-east of England, at the head of its 50-mile (80 km) estuary leading to the North Sea, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. Londinium was founded by the Romans. The City of London, London's ancient core − an area of just 1.12 square miles (2.9 km2) and colloquially known as the Square Mile − retains boundaries that follow closely its medieval limits. The City of Westminster is also an Inner London borough holding city status. Greater London is governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly.

In 1400 in Paris, he married Marie, Duchess of Auvergne, daughter of John, Duke of Berry, who inherited the Auvergne title from her father. They had three sons:

Paris Capital of France

Paris is the capital and most populous city of France, with an area of 105 square kilometres and an official estimated population of 2,140,526 residents as of 1 January 2019. Since the 17th century, Paris has been one of Europe's major centres of finance, diplomacy, commerce, fashion, science, and the arts.

Marie, Duchess of Auvergne French duchess

Marie of Berry was suo jure Sovereign Duchess of Auvergne and Countess of Montpensier in 1416-1434. She was the daughter of John, Duke of Berry, and Joanna of Armagnac. She was married three times. She acted as administrator of the Duchy of Bourbon for her third spouse John I, Duke of Bourbon, during his imprisonment in England after he was captured following the French defeat at the Battle of Agincourt in 1415, until 1434.

John, Duke of Berry French duke

John of Berry or John the Magnificent was Duke of Berry and Auvergne and Count of Poitiers and Montpensier. He was the third son of King John II of France and Bonne of Luxemburg; his brothers were King Charles V of France, Duke Louis I of Anjou and Duke Philip the Bold of Burgundy. He is primarily remembered as a collector of the important illuminated manuscripts and other works of art commissioned by him, such as the Très Riches Heures.

  1. Charles de Bourbon (14011456), Duke of Bourbon
  2. Louis of Bourbon (14031412, Paris), Count of Forez
  3. Louis de Bourbon (14051486), Count of Montpensier

In addition, he had an illegitimate daughter:

  1. Margaret, married to Rodrigo de Villandrando.

Notes

  1. Bennett, Michael, Agincourt 1415: triumph against the odds, (Osprey Publishing, 1991), 36.

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Louise de Bourbon was the Duchess of Montpensier, suo jure from February 1538 to 1561. She was the great great great grandmother of La Grande Mademoiselle.

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Jeanne d'Ussel, also known as Jeanne de Clermont was countess of Forez, received in inheritance, belonging to the House of Ussel. She was married in June 1371 to Béraud II. Through marriage, Jeanne brought the fiefdom of d’Ussel in Languedoc, and the county of Forez, and eventually became known as "Jeanne de Forez" or "Jeanne de Clermont" in reference to her husband Béraud de Clermont, Dauphin d'Auvergne of the House of Clermont-Tonnerre of the Counts of Clermont-Tonnerre.

References

French nobility
Preceded by
Louis II
Duke of Bourbon
1410–1434
Succeeded by
Charles I
Preceded by
Louis II
Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis
1400–1424
Preceded by
Louis II
Anna d'Auvergne
Count of Forez
1410–1434
Preceded by
John
Duke of Auvergne
1416–1434
with Marie
Preceded by
John
Count of Montpensier
1416–1434
with Marie
Succeeded by
Louis I
Preceded by
Jourdain VI
Count of L'Isle-Jourdain
1405–1421
Succeeded by
John IV