John I, Marquis of Namur

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John I, Marquis of Namur
Born1267
Died(1330-01-31)31 January 1330
Noble family Dampierre
Spouse(s)Margaret of Clermont
Marie of Artois
Father Guy of Dampierre
Mother Isabelle of Luxembourg

John I (1267 – 31 January 1330) was the count of Namur from 1305 to 1330. He was a member of the House of Dampierre, the son of Guy of Dampierre, Count of Flanders and Marquis of Namur, and his second wife Isabelle of Luxembourg. John was the father of Blanche of Namur, Queen of Sweden and Norway. He was the elder brother of Guy of Namur, whom he sent to command the Flemish rebels against the French Kingdom in the 1302 Battle of the Golden Spurs.

Contents

Life

In September 1290, he was betrothed to Blanche of France, daughter of Philip III.

Instead, John married Margaret of Clermont, daughter of Robert, Count of Clermont and Beatrix, Dame de Bourbon, in 1307. He was Margaret's second husband. She died after two years of marriage, in 1309.

John's second wife was Marie of Artois (1291 – 22 January 1365, Wijnendaele), (later to become Lady of Merode), daughter of Philip of Artois and Blanche of Brittany. They were married by contract in Paris on 6 March 1310, confirmed Poissy, January 1313. John granted her as dower the castle of Wijnendale in Flanders, ratified by the Count of Flanders (his half-brother, Robert III) in 1313.

Issue

NameLifespanNotes
John of Namur
Marquis of Namur
1310/12 –
2 April 1335
Succeeded his father in 1330 as John II, Marquis of Namur. Buried at Kloster Spaltheim.
Guy of Namur
Marquis of Namur
1311/13 –
12 March 1336
Succeeded his brother in 1335 as Guy II, Marquis of Namur.
Henry of Namur
1312/13 –
8 October 1333
Canon at Chartres Cathedral; canon at Cambrai Cathedral, 1324; canon at Châlons-sur-Marne and Reims, 1325.
Philip of Namur
Marquis of Namur
1319 –
September 1337
Succeeded his brother in 1336 as Philip III, Marquis of Namur. Murdered at Famagusta, Cyprus.
Blanche of Namur
Queen consort of Sweden and Norway
1320 –
autumn 1363
She was accused by the noblewoman Birgitta Birgersdatter (Saint Bridget of Sweden) of having poisoned the latter's son, her innocence of the crime only being proved at the end of the 18th century. She lived at Tønsberghus castle in Norway from 1358, because of the political situation in Sweden, and administered the fiefs of Vestfold and Skienssysla. Married 5 November 1335 at Bohus Castle Magnus IV of Sweden. He was deposed in 1344 as King of Norway, and in 1363 as King of Sweden.
Marie of Namur
Gräfin von Vianden
Dame de Pierrepont
1322 –
before 29 October 1357
Married firstly, in 1335/36, Henry II, Graf of Vianden, son of Philip II, Graf of Vianden and his first wife Lucia von der Neuerburg. Her first husband was murdered at Famagusta in September 1337. Married secondly (1340, dispensation 9 September 1342) her father's second cousin, Theobald of Bar, Seigneur de Pierrepont, son of Erard of Bar, Seigneur de Pierrepont et d'Ancerville (himself son of Theobald II of Bar), and his wife Isabelle of Lorraine (daughter of Theobald II, Duke of Lorraine).
Margaret of Namur
1323 –
13 September 1383
A nun at Peteghem.
William of Namur
Marquis of Namur
1324 –
1 October 1391
Succeeded his brother in 1337 as William I "the Rich", Marquis of Namur. Buried at the Franciscan convent in Namur. Father of William II, Marquis of Namur, and John III, Marquis of Namur, who sold Namur to Philip the Good.
Robert of Namur
Seigneur de Beaufort-sur-Meuse et de Renaix
1325 –
1/29 April 1391
Seigneur de Beaufort-sur-Meuse et de Renaix; Marshal of Brabant. Married firstly (dispensation 18 October 1354) Isabelle of Hainault, sister of Philippa of Hainault, daughter of William III, Count of Hainault and his wife Joan of Valois. Married secondly (4 February 1380) as her first husband, Isabeau de Melun, heiress of Viane, daughter of Hugues de Melun, Seigneur d'Antoing (died 1409). Robert had two illegitimate children by unknown mistresses.
Louis of Namur
Seigneur de Peteghem et de Bailleul
1325 –
1378/86
Seigneur de Peteghem et de Bailleul. Flemish counsellor. Governor of Namur 1351. Married on 17 May 1365 Isabelle de Roucy, Dame de Roucy, daughter and heiress of Robert II, Count of Roucy and his wife Marie d'Enghien (-after 1396).
Elizabeth of Namur
Electress Palatine
1329 –
29 March 1382
Married Rupert I, Elector Palatine, in autumn 1350 or summer 1358. Died without children in Heidelberg.

Sources

John I, Marquis of Namur
Born: 1267 Died: 31 January 1330
Preceded by
Guy I
Marquis of Namur Namur Arms.svg
1305–1330
Succeeded by
John II

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