John J. Ryan

Last updated
John J. Ryan
Coach Jack Ryan.jpg
Ryan pictured in The Hilltop 1920, Marquette yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1886-04-03)April 3, 1886
Waterbury, Connecticut
DiedApril 7, 1950(1950-04-07) (aged 64)
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Playing career
Football
1906 New Hampshire
1908–1910 Dartmouth
Baseball
1909 Dartmouth
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1911–1912 St. Thomas (MN)
1916 Marquette (advisory)
1917–1921 Marquette
1922 Dartmouth (assistant)
1923–1924 Wisconsin
1925–1929 Northwestern (ends)
1934–1939 Northwestern (assistant)
Basketball
1917–1920 Marquette
Head coaching record
Overall44–11–11 (football)
13–9 (basketball)

John Joseph Ryan (April 3, 1886 – April 7, 1950) was an American football and basketball player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the College of St. Thomas in Saint Paul, Minnesota from 1911 to 1912, at Marquette University from 1917 to 1921, and at the University of Wisconsin from 1923 to 1924, compiling a career college football record of 44–11–11. Ryan was also the head basketball coach at Marquette from 1917 to 1920, tallying a mark of 13–9.

Contents

Early life and playing career

Ryan was born on April 3, 1886, in Waterbury, Connecticut. [1] He first attended New Hampshire College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts (which later became the University of New Hampshire), where he played quarterback on the 1906 New Hampshire football team. [2] Ryan then attended Dartmouth College, where he played football, basketball, and baseball. He was captain of the 1910 Dartmouth football team. [3] [4]

Coaching career

After graduating from Dartmouth in 1911, Ryan began his coaching career at St. Thomas College in Saint Paul, Minnesota, where he was the school's first resident athletic coach. He moved to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1914, where he worked for a flour milling firm based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He joined the football team at Marquette University in 1916 as an advisory coach under fellow Dartmouth alumnus, John B. McAuliffe. Ryan replaced McAuliffe as head coach the following year and held the post for five seasons, during which he compiled a record of 28–5–5. He returned to his alma mater in 1922 to serve as an assistant to Jackson Cannell.

In March 1923, Ryan was hired as the head football coach at the University of Wisconsin. He was also given the title of assistant professor and paid an annual salary of $6,000. [5] Ryan helmed the Badgers football team for two seasons, tallying a mark of 5–6–4. He moved to Northwestern University in 1925, where he was the ends coach for five seasons under Glenn Thistlethwaite and Dick Hanley. Ryan returned to Hanley's staff as an assistant coach and scout in 1934, and continued on under Pappy Waldorf until 1939. [3]

Later life and death

Ryan served on the board of school directors in Milwaukee from 1940 until his death. He died on April 7, 1950, at St. Mary's Hospital in Milwaukee. [3]

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
St. Thomas Cadets (Independent)(1911–1912)
1911 St. Thomas5–0–1
1912 St. Thomas6–0–1
St. Thomas:11–0–2
Marquette Golden Avalanche (Independent)(1917–1921)
1917 Marquette 8–0–1
1918 Marquette 2–0–1
1919 Marquette 5–1–2
1920 Marquette 7–2
1921 Marquette 6–2–1
Marquette:28–5–5
Wisconsin Badgers (Big Ten Conference)(1923–1924)
1923 Wisconsin 3–3–11–3–17th
1924 Wisconsin 2–3–30–2–2T–8th
Wisconsin:5–6–41–5–3
Total:44–11–11

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References

  1. Emerson, Charles Franklin (1911). General Catalogue of Dartmouth College and the Associated Schools 1769-1910. Concord, New Hampshire: Rumford Press. p. 458. Retrieved October 31, 2011.
  2. "Alumni Notes". The New Hampshire College Monthly. Vol. 16 no. 3. December 1908. p.  90 . Retrieved May 16, 2020 via Wayback Machine.
  3. 1 2 3 "John J. Ryan Dead; Ex-Football Coach; Served at U. of Wisconsin and MarquetteCaptain of 1910 Eleven at Dartmouth" (PDF). The New York Times . AP. April 9, 1950. Retrieved October 30, 2011.
  4. "John J. Ryan, 62, Dies; Ex-Wisconsin Coach". The Philadelphia Inquirer . AP. April 9, 1950. p. 55. Retrieved May 16, 2020 via newspapers.com.
  5. "Ryan to coach Wisconsin.; Former Dartmouth Man Selected for Football Post" (PDF). The New York Times . March 8, 1923. Retrieved October 30, 2011.