John J. Weinheimer

Last updated
John J. Weinheimer
Biographical details
Bornc. 1896
DiedDecember 18, 1951 (aged 55)
New York, New York
Playing career
1916 NYU
1919–1921 NYU
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1922–1943 NYU (assistant)
1944–1946 NYU
Head coaching record
Overall10–12

John J. Weinheimer (c. 1896 – December 18, 1951) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at New York University from 1944 to 1946, compiling a record of 10–12. Weinheimer played football and other sports at NYU. He was awarded a place in NYU's Athletic Hall of Fame for his playing and coaching efforts. [1] Weinheimer died at the age of 55 on December 18, 1951, of a heart attack at his home in New York City. [2]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
NYU Violets (Independent)(1944–1946)
1944 NYU2–5
1945 NYU3–4
1946 NYU5–3
NYU:10–12
Total:10–12

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References

  1. NYU Athletics - Hall of Fame
  2. "John Weinheimer Of N.Y.U. Is Dead; Football Coach, 1944-46, Was Manager of University's Athletic Association" (PDF). The New York Times . December 19, 1951. Retrieved March 4, 2013.