John Lyttelton (MP)

Last updated

John Lyttelton

MP JP
Hagley, St John the Baptist - interior, Meriel Lyttelton nee Bromley 1.jpg
St John the Baptist Church, Hagley, monument to Meriel Bromley, the wife of Sir John Lyttelton, with a remarkable anti-Catholic inscription
Born1561
Died1601
NationalityEnglish
OccupationPolitician and Knight
TitleSir
Spouse(s)Meriel Bromley
Children11, including Sir Thomas Lyttelton, 1st Baronet
Parent(s) Sir Gilbert Lyttelton
Elizabeth Coningsby

John Lyttelton MP JP (1561 – 1601) was an English politician and member of the Lyttelton family who served as Member of Parliament for Worcestershire during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I.

He was the eldest son of Sir Gilbert Lyttelton. He entered Magdalen College, Oxford in 1576 and studied law at the Inner Temple. He married Meriel, daughter of Sir Thomas Bromley, Lord Chancellor of England. They had three sons and eight daughters.

He was elected to Parliament as knight of the shire for Worcestershire in 1584, 1586 and 1597. He was also JP for the country from about 1583 and was its custos rotulorum by 1601.

He was involved in the Rebellion of Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex in 1601 and was subsequently tried for high treason, but died in the Queen's Bench prison in July 1601, having been reprieved from execution. In consequence, his estates (in Frankley, Halesowen, Hagley and Upper Arley) were forfeited to the Crown, but were restored to his widow, Meriel, on the accession of James I. She survived him (by 28 years) and cleared the estates of debt, bringing up her children as Anglicans. The eldest became Sir Thomas Lyttelton, 1st Baronet.

His brother Humphrey was executed for his part in the Gunpowder Plot.

Sir John was buried at St. George the Martyr, Southwark. [1]

Related Research Articles

Baron Lyttelton

Baron Lyttelton is a title that has been created twice in Peerage of Great Britain, both times for members of the Lyttelton family. Since 1889 the title has been a subsidiary title of the viscountcy of Cobham.

Viscount Cobham

Viscount Cobham is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain that was created in 1718. Owing to its special remainder, the title has passed through several families. Since 1889, it has been held by members of the Lyttelton family.

Sir Thomas Lyttelton, 1st Baronet

Sir Thomas Lyttelton, 1st Baronet was an English Royalist officer and politician from the Lyttelton family during the English Civil War.

George Lyttelton, 4th Baron Lyttelton English cricketer & nobleman

George William Lyttelton, 4th Baron Lyttelton, 4th Baron Westcote, was an English aristocrat and Conservative politician from the Lyttelton family. He was chairman of the Canterbury Association, which encouraged British settlers to move to New Zealand.

Littleton baronets

Three baronetcies have been created in the Baronetage of England for members of the Littleton or Lyttelton family. All three lines are descended from Thomas de Littleton, a noted 15th-century jurist. Despite differences in spelling of the title, the names of all three lines were spelt in many varied ways in the early modern period, without distinction between the different branches of the family. This can be confusing, as the range of forenames in use was very limited.

John Lyttelton, 9th Viscount Cobham English army officer and politician

John Cavendish Lyttelton, 9th Viscount Cobham,, was a British peer, soldier, and Conservative politician from the Lyttelton family.

Gilbert Lyttelton 16th-century English politician and knight

Gilbert Lyttelton MP was an English politician and landowner from the Lyttelton family.

Sir Henry Lyttelton, 2nd Baronet was an English politician and member of the Lyttelton family. He was a Royalist officer during the English Civil War. After the Restoration, from 1678 to 1679 he sat in the House of Commons.

Sir Charles Lyttelton, 3rd Baronet, of Frankley, in the County of Worcester, MP was one of early English Governors of Jamaica, an army officer and Member of Parliament from the Lyttelton family.

Sir Thomas Lyttelton, 4th Baronet, of Frankley, in the County of Worcester, was an English landowner and Whig politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1721 to 1741. He held office as one of the Lords of the Admiralty from 1727 to 1741.

William Lyttelton, 1st Baron Lyttelton British politician

William Henry Lyttelton, 1st Baron Lyttelton MP was a British peer, politician, and colonial administrator from the Lyttelton family. He was the youngest son of Sir Thomas Lyttelton, 4th Baronet.

There have been two baronetcies created for persons with the surname Pakington, one in the Baronetage of England and one in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. One creation is extant as of 2008.

Sir John Lyttelton (1520–1590)

Sir John Lyttelton was an English nobleman, politician, knight, and landowner from the Lyttelton family during the Tudor period.

Humphrey Littleton, or Humphrey Lyttelton, died on 7 April 1606 at Red Hill outside Worcester. A member of the Lyttelton family, he was executed for his involvement in the Gunpowder plot. Robert Wintour and Stephen Littleton who had escaped from the fight at Holbeche House were captured at Hagley Park on 9 January 1606 despite Littleton's protests that he was not harbouring anyone. It was Littleton who told the authorities that Edward Oldcorne was hiding at Hindlip Hall after he had given him mass. Wintour, Oldcorne, and both Littletons were all executed.

John Yorke (Conservative politician)

John Reginald Yorke was an English landowner and Conservative politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1864 and 1886.

Leicester baronets

There have been two baronetcies created for persons with the surname Leicester, both in the Baronetage of England. The fifth Baronet of the second creation was raised to the peerage as Baron de Tabley in 1826. Both the barony and the two baronetcies are now extinct.

Sir Robert Tracy, 2nd Viscount Tracy was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons of England variously between 1620 and 1640. He fought for the Royalists in the English Civil War.

Henry Bromley (died 1615)

Sir Henry Bromley was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1584 and 1604. He was twice imprisoned for his political activities, the second and most serious occasion in the aftermath of the Essex Rebellion. Restored to favour in the Jacobean period, he was vigorous in suppressing the Gunpowder Plot.

Lyttelton family British aristocratic family

The Lyttelton family is a British aristocratic family. Over time, several members of the Lyttelton family were made knights, baronets and peers. Hereditary titles held by the Lyttelton family include the viscountcies of Cobham and Chandos, as well as the Lyttelton barony and Lyttelton baronetcy. Several other members of the family have also risen to prominence, particularly in the field of cricket.

Meriel Lyttelton

Meriel Lyttelton or Littelton was an English aristocrat with extensive family and court connections

References

  1. Debrett, John (1823). Debrett's Peerage of England, Scotland, and Ireland. London. p. 1:549. Retrieved 1 September 2017.