John Newmaster

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John Newmaster (fl. 1391–1407) of Wells, Somerset, was an English politician.

He was a Member (MP) of the Parliament of England for Wells in 1391, 1393, 1394 and 1407. [1]

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References

  1. "NEWMASTER, John, of Wells, Som. | History of Parliament Online". historyofparliamentonline.org.