John Oldrid Scott

Last updated
John Oldrid Scott
Born(1841-07-17)17 July 1841 [1]
Died30 May 1913(1913-05-30) (aged 71) [1]
Bexhill-on-Sea, England
Occupation Architect
Spouse(s)Mary Ann, née Stevens [2]
ChildrenHenry George Scott, [3] John Stevens Scott (24 May 1869) [1]
Parent(s)Sir George Gilbert Scott and Caroline née Oldrid

John Oldrid Scott (17 July 1841 – 30 May 1913) was an English architect.

Contents

Biography

He was the son of Sir Gilbert Scott (George Gilbert Scott) and his wife Caroline (née Oldrid). His brother George Gilbert Scott Junior and nephew Sir Giles Gilbert Scott were also prominent architects. In 1868 he married Mary Ann Stevens, eldest daughter of the Reverend Thomas Stevens, founder of Bradfield College. One of his nine children, Charles Marriott Oldrid Scott, worked in his architectural practice.

At the end of his career he lived in Peasmarsh, near Rye, East Sussex, and the sale of his farmhouse and 136 acres was mentioned in the national press in 1928. [4]

Works

St Mary's Church, Slough St Marys Church Slough.jpg
St Mary's Church, Slough
Interior of St Sophia's Greek Orthodox Cathedral, Bayswater St Sophia's Greek Orthodox Cathedral Interior 2, London, UK - Diliff.jpg
Interior of St Sophia's Greek Orthodox Cathedral, Bayswater
St John the Evangelist's church, Boscombe St John the Evangelist Boscombe Dorset Geograph-4199608-by-Dave-Bevis.jpg
St John the Evangelist's church, Boscombe
St John the Evangelist's church, Palmers Green St John the Evangelist, Palmers Green, London N13 - geograph.org.uk - 1103873.jpg
St John the Evangelist's church, Palmers Green

Related Research Articles

Elsfield Human settlement in England

Elsfield is a village and civil parish about 3 miles (5 km) northeast of the centre of Oxford. The village is 310 feet (94 m) above sea level on the western brow of a hill with relatively steep sides above the River Cherwell. For relative reference purposes, the Oxford alluvial flood plain is at 60 metres above sea level.

George Frederick Bodley architect from United Kingdom

George Frederick Bodley was an English Gothic Revival architect. He was a pupil of Sir George Gilbert Scott, and worked in partnership with Thomas Garner for much of his career. He was one of the founders of Watts & Co.

Arthur Blomfield English architect

Sir Arthur William Blomfield was an English architect. He became president of the Architectural Association in 1861; a Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1867 and vice-president of the RIBA in 1886. He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he read Architecture.

Samuel Sanders Teulon was a 19th-century English Gothic Revival architect, noted for his use of polychrome brickwork and the complex planning of his buildings.

William White (architect) English architect, born 1825

William White, FSA (1825–1900) was an English architect, noted for his part in 19th century Gothic Revival architecture and church restorations. He was the son of a clergyman and great nephew of the writer and naturalist, Gilbert White of Selborne.

Ewan Christian British architect

Ewan Christian (1814–95) was a British architect. He is most notable for the restorations of Southwell Minster and Carlisle Cathedral, and the design of the National Portrait Gallery. He was Architect to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners from 1851 to 1895. Christian was elected A RIBA in 1840, FRIBA in 1850, RIBA President 1884–86 and was awarded the Royal Gold Medal in 1887.

Richard Charles Hussey, often referred to as R. C. Hussey, was a British architect. He was in partnership with Thomas Rickman from 1835, whose practice he assumed in 1838 with the latter's failing health; Rickman died on 4 January 1841.

Benjamin Ferrey, FSA, FRIBA was an English architect who worked mostly in the Gothic Revival.

Sir Charles Nicholson, 2nd Baronet British architect

Sir Charles Archibald Nicholson, 2nd Baronet, was an English architect and designer who specialised in ecclesiastical buildings and war memorials. He carried out the refurbishments of several cathedrals, the design and build of over a dozen new churches, and the restoration of many existing, medieval parish churches.

Somers Clarke British architect and Egyptologist

George Somers Clarke (1841–1926) was an architect and English Egyptologist who worked at a number of sites throughout Egypt, notably in El Kab, where he built a house. He was born in Brighton.

Stoke Talmage Human settlement in England

Stoke Talmage is a village and civil parish 4 12 miles (7 km) south of Thame in Oxfordshire.

Charles Buckeridge Gothic revival architect

Charles Buckeridge was a British Gothic Revival architect who trained as a pupil of Sir George Gilbert Scott. He practised in Oxford 1856–68 and in London from 1869. He was made an Associate of the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1861.

Clapton Crabb Rolfe was an English Gothic Revival architect whose practice was based in Oxford.

Edward George Bruton was a British Gothic Revival architect who practised in Oxford. He was made an Associate of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) in 1855 and a Fellow of the RIBA in 1861.

Harry George Walter Drinkwater (1844–1895) was an English architect who practised in and around Oxford.

Joseph Clarke was a British Gothic Revival architect who practised in London, England.

Edwin Dolby was an English Victorian architect who practised in Abingdon. His works include the design of Abingdon School.

Alfred Mardon Mowbray (1849–1915) was an English Gothic Revival architect who practiced in Oxford and Eastbourne from the 1860s to the 1900s.

Charles Nightingale Beazley (1834–97), FRIBA was a British architect. His work spans the period 1853–97.

William Slater was an English architect who was born in Northamptonshire and practised in London. He oversaw restoration of many churches, latterly in partnership with R. H. Carpenter.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "John Oldrid Scott". Our Family Genealogy Pages. Basil Halhed. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 2 September 2015.
  2. "'". The Times (30227). London. 2 June 1913. col E, p. 11.
  3. "'". The Times (46988). London. 14 February 1935. col A, p. 1.
  4. "'". The Times (44918). London. 13 June 1928. col F, p. 7.
  5. Historic England. "West Norwood Cemetery and Crematorium  (Grade II*) (1000851)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 2 September 2015.
  6. Pevsner & Williamson 1979, p. 98.
  7. Pevsner 1968, p. 271.
  8. St Mary's Church, Slough
  9. Historic England. "Greek Cathedral of Aghia Sophia and presbytery  (Grade I) (1223553)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 2 September 2015.
  10. Newman 1976, p. 318.
  11. Pevsner & Hubbard 1971, p. 171.
  12. Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 274.
  13. "Planning Application Number: 05/00893/FUL" (PDF). Oxford City Council. 2005-06-16. Retrieved 2018-04-11. The boathouse was designed by John Oldrid Scott, 2nd son of George Gilbert Scott, and completed in 1880. Shortly after its construction it was burnt out in 1881, but rebuilt to its original designs in 1884. Its listed Grade II status probably derives in part from its connections with the Gilbert Scott family of architects but also from its contribution to the history of the development of boathouses in the late 19th century. Early history in college rowing depended on the use of rowing 'barges' of which very few now survive. The University College Boathouse was one of the early examples of the move of the boathouse onto dry land. Rather ironically in1999 the boathouse was once again subject to fire which effectively destroyed it and has led to these proposals to remove what is left and rebuild on the same site, but in a contemporary design.
  14. Pevsner & Hubbard 1971, p. 221.
  15. "Cheshire Frodsham, St. Lawrence [H00016]". National Pipe Organ Register. 2018. Retrieved 16 September 2018.
  16. Pevsner 1974, p. 148.
  17. Pevsner 1968, p. 180.
  18. Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 413.
  19. Pevsner & Harris 1964, p. 168.
  20. Lamport, Tim. "History". Croydon Minster. Archived from the original on 24 March 2012. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  21. Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 806.
  22. Pevsner & Harris 1964, p. 560.
  23. Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 723.
  24. Pevsner 1958, p. 160.
  25. Francis 2013, p. 47.
  26. 1 2 Pevsner & Lloyd 1967, p. 124.
  27. Pevsner 1960, p. 300.
  28. Historic England. "Church of St Philip  (Grade II) (1187579)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  29. Pevsner & Williamson 1978, p. 201.
  30. Pevsner & Radcliffe 1967, p. 248.
  31. Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 731.
  32. Pevsner & Williamson 1978, p. 165.
  33. Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 832.
  34. Pevsner 1963, pp. 146, 153.
  35. Historic England. "Parish church of St John the Evangelist, Palmer's Green with parish room  (Grade II*) (1078929)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 2 September 2015.
  36. Pevsner 1966, p. 120.
  37. Pevsner & Cherry 1977, p. 307.
  38. Pevsner 1960, p. 225.

Sources and further reading