John Paul Stevens

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Concern that a national standing army might pose a threat to the security of the separate states led to the adoption of that amendment, which provides that "a well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed." Today that concern is a relic of the 18th century. [63]

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John Paul Stevens
John Paul Stevens, SCOTUS photo portrait.jpg
Official portrait, 2006
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States
In office
December 17, 1975 June 29, 2010
External video
Nuvola apps kaboodle.svg Q&A interview with Stevens about Five Chiefs, October 9, 2011, C-SPAN

In 2011, Stevens published a memoir entitled Five Chiefs: A Supreme Court Memoir, which detailed his legal career during the tenure of five of the Supreme Court's chief justices. In Five Chiefs, Stevens recounts his time as a law clerk during the tenure of Chief Justice Vinson; his experiences as a private attorney during the Warren era; and his experience while serving as an associate justice on the Burger, Rehnquist, and Roberts courts. [64]

In 2014, Stevens published Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution, where he proposed that six amendments should be added to the U.S. Constitution to address political gerrymandering, anti-commandeering, campaign finance reform, capital punishment, gun violence, and sovereign immunity. [65]

In 2019, at age 99 and shortly before his death, Stevens published The Making of a Justice: Reflections on My First 94 Years. [66]

Personal life

Stevens married Elizabeth Sheeren in 1942. He was on the high court when the couple divorced thirty-seven years later in 1979. Later that same year, he married Maryan Simon; they remained married until her death in 2015. Stevens had four children, two of whom predeceased him.

Stevens was a Protestant, and upon his retirement, the Supreme Court had no Protestant members for the first time in its history. [67] [68] [69] He was one of only two Supreme Court justices who divorced while on the Court—the first was William O. Douglas, whom he coincidentally succeeded as an associate justice. [70] Stevens was also an avid bridge player and belonged to the Pompano Duplicate Bridge Club Florida. [71] Just months before his death, Stevens, a Republican, spoke out against President Donald Trump saying that "I am not a fan of President Trump" and when asked about Trump's effect on the country he stated "I don't think it's been favorable." [72]

Death

Stevens died at age 99 from complications of a stroke in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on July 16, 2019. [9] He received hospice care and was with his two surviving children, Elizabeth and Susan, when he died. [73] In addition to his two daughters, Stevens was survived by 9 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. [74] He lay in repose at the Supreme Court on July 22, 2019 [75] before a planned burial at Arlington National Cemetery on July 23, 2019. [76] President Donald Trump ordered flags to fly at half-staff as a mark of respect on Tuesday, July 23, until sundown. [77]

Stevens was portrayed by the actor William Schallert in the 2008 film Recount . He was portrayed by David Grant Wright in two episodes of Boston Legal in which Alan Shore and Denny Crane appear before the Supreme Court.

According to an April 2009 article in The Wall Street Journal, Stevens "rendered an opinion on who wrote Shakespeare's plays," proclaiming himself an Oxfordian." That is, he believes the works ascribed to William Shakespeare actually were written by Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford. [78] As a result, he was appointed Oxfordian of the Year by the Shakespeare Oxford Society. [79] According to the article, Antonin Scalia and Harry Blackmun shared Stevens's belief. [78]

Stevens appeared in interviews in two episodes of Ken Burns' 2011 PBS documentary miniseries Prohibition , recalling his childhood in Chicago in the 1920s and 30s. [80] [81] [82]

Stevens was 12 years old when he was at Wrigley Field for the 1932 World Series game at which Babe Ruth hit his "called shot" home run. [83] Eighty-four years later, he attended Game 4 of the 2016 World Series, also at Wrigley Field, wearing a red bowtie with a Chicago Cubs jacket. [84]

See also

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References

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  83. Tom Verducci, "Timeless," Sports Illustrated, November 7, 2016, p. 36.
  84. Footer, Alyson (October 29, 2016). "Justice Stevens takes in 3rd Cubs World Series". MLB.com . Archived from the original on July 18, 2019.

Further reading

Legal offices
Preceded by
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit
1970–1975
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States
1975–2010
Succeeded by