John Potter (priest)

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John Potter (c. 1713 – 1770) was an 18th-century Church of England clergyman who was Dean of Canterbury from 1766 to 1770.

Church of England Anglican state church of England

The Church of England is the established church of England. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England is also the mother church of the international Anglican Communion. It traces its history to the Christian church recorded as existing in the Roman province of Britain by the third century, and to the 6th-century Gregorian mission to Kent led by Augustine of Canterbury.

Dean of Canterbury

The Dean of Canterbury is the head of the Chapter of the Cathedral of Christ Church, Canterbury, England. The current office of dean originated after the English Reformation, although Deans had also existed before this time; its immediate precursor office was the prior of the cathedral-monastery. The current Dean is Robert Willis, who was appointed in 2001 and is the 39th Dean since the Reformation, though the position of Dean and Prior as the religious head of the community is almost identical so the line is unbroken back to the time of the foundation of the community by Saint Augustine in AD 597.

He was the eldest son of John Potter, Archbishop of Canterbury (1673/4–1747). Following a private education, he studied at Christ Church, Oxford (1727), taking an MA in 1734. His first ecclesiastical appointment was as vicar of St Mary, Blackburn (1738, resigned 1742), followed by rector of Elm, with Emneth Chapel (Norfolk, 1738–1755). [1] In 1741 his father installed him as Archdeacon of Oxford. He obtained the degree of BD the same year. In 1742 he was collated by his father to the vicarage of Lydd (Kent), together with the Rectory of Chiddingstone. He was installed as a prebendary of Canterbury Cathedral in 1745 (Stall XII). [2] He obtained the degree of DD in 1746, and the following year exchanged Chiddingstone for the rectory of Wrotham (Kent). In 1766 he succeeded Dr William Freind as Dean of Canterbury. He died in 1770 at Wrotham where he is buried. [3]

John Potter (bishop) Archbishop of Canterbury

John Potter was Archbishop of Canterbury (1737-1747).

Archbishop of Canterbury senior bishop of the Church of England

The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior bishop and principal leader of the Church of England, the symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of Canterbury. The current archbishop is Justin Welby, who was enthroned at Canterbury Cathedral on 21 March 2013. Welby is the 105th in a line which goes back more than 1400 years to Augustine of Canterbury, the "Apostle to the English", sent from Rome in the year 597. Welby succeeded Rowan Williams.

Christ Church, Oxford constituent college of the University of Oxford in England

Christ Church is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England. Christ Church is a joint foundation of the college and the cathedral of the Oxford diocese, which serves as the college chapel and whose dean is ex officio the college head.

Potter was disinherited by his father as a result of a marriage of which the archbishop disapproved but he nevertheless enjoyed considerable preferment within the church as a result of his father's patronage. [4] Hasted noted 'He had married very imprudently in his early part of life, and consequently highly to the disapprobation of his father, who though he presented him as is mentioned before to several valuable preferments in the church, yet disinherited him, by leaving the whole of his fortune to his youngest son, Thomas Potter, esq.' [5]

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References

  1. Location: Cathedral Office: Canterbury Cathedral, Dean in "CCEd, the Clergy of the Church of England database " (Accessed online , 2 February 2014)
  2. Fasti ecclesiae anglicanae, III, iii,. 14; III, iii. 40 ()
  3. H.J. Todd, Some account of the deans of Canterbury, Canterbury, 1793, pp. 225-228.
  4. Rebecca Louise Warner, ‘Potter, John (1673/4–1747)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 25 Oct 2009
  5. Edward Hasted, 'Canterbury cathedral: The deans (from 1672 to 1800)'. In: The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent, Volume 12 (1801), pp. 27-55. Date accessed: 25 October 2009.
Church of England titles
Preceded by
William Freind
Dean of Canterbury
1766–1770
Succeeded by
Brownlow North