John Proby (died 1710)

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Arms of Proby: Ermine, on a fess gules a lion passant or ProbyArms.svg
Arms of Proby: Ermine, on a fess gules a lion passant or

John Proby (c. 1639 – 14 November 1710) of Elton Hall, Huntingdonshire (now in Cambridgeshire) was an English lawyer and independent politician who sat in the English and British House of Commons at various times between 1693 and 1710.

Elton Hall Grade I listed historic house museum in Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom

Elton Hall is a baronial hall in Elton, Cambridgeshire. It has been the ancestral home of the Proby family since 1660.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

House of Commons of Great Britain historic British lower house of Parliament

The House of Commons of Great Britain was the lower house of the Parliament of Great Britain between 1707 and 1801. In 1707, as a result of the Acts of Union of that year, it replaced the House of Commons of England and the third estate of the Parliament of Scotland, as one of the most significant changes brought about by the Union of the kingdoms of England and Scotland into the Kingdom of Great Britain.

Contents

Early life

Elton Hall, Cambridgeshire Elton Hall - geograph.org.uk - 1258739.jpg
Elton Hall, Cambridgeshire

Proby was baptized on 16 January 1639, the second son of Sir Heneage Proby and his wife Ellen Allen daughter of Edward Allen, of Finchley, Middlesex. He was admitted at Jesus College, Cambridge and at Middle Temple on 2 April 1657. [1] In 1664, he was called to the bar. He was a bencher of his Inn in 1684. [2] He was the grandson of Sir Peter Proby, Lord Mayor of London in 1622, and younger brother of Sir Thomas Proby, 1st Baronet, from whom he inherited Elton Hall in 1689. [3] By 1691, he married Jane Cust, daughter of Sir Richard Cust, 1st Baronet of Blackfriars, Stamford, Lincolnshire. [2]

Jesus College, Cambridge constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England

Jesus College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England. The college's full name is The College of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Saint John the Evangelist and the glorious Virgin Saint Radegund, near Cambridge. Its common name comes from the name of its chapel, Jesus Chapel.

Middle Temple one of the four Inns of Court in London, England

The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, commonly known simply as Middle Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court exclusively entitled to call their members to the English Bar as barristers, the others being the Inner Temple, Gray's Inn and Lincoln's Inn. It is located in the wider Temple area of London, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London.

The Lord Mayor of London is the City's mayor and the leader of the City of London Corporation. Within the City of London, the Lord Mayor is accorded precedence over all individuals except the sovereign and retains various traditional powers, rights and privileges, including the title and style The Right Honourable Lord Mayor of London.

Career

Proby was returned as Member of Parliament for Huntingdonshire at a by-election on 23 December 1693 on the interest of the Whig Earl of Manchester. He was not very active in Parliament and at the 1695 English general election, he was replaced by a relation of the Duke. He was returned again unopposed at the 1698 English general election and at the two general elections of 1701. He supported a motion on 26 February 1702 to vindicate the Commons' for the impeachment of the Whig ministers, was not put forward by Manchester at the 1702 English general election. From 1698 to 1699 he was treasurer of his Inn. [2]

Huntingdonshire was a Parliamentary constituency covering the county of Huntingdonshire in England. It was represented in the House of Commons of England until 1707, then in the House of Commons of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800, and then in the House of Commons the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885. It returned two Knights of the Shire ; when elections were contested, the bloc vote system was used.

Charles Montagu, 1st Duke of Manchester British diplomat

Charles Edward Montagu, 1st Duke of Manchester PC of the Noble House of Montagu, previously 4th Earl of Manchester, son of Robert Montagu, 3rd Earl of Manchester, was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, and succeeded to his father's earldom in 1683. Warmly sympathizing with the Whig revolution of 1688, he attended William and Mary at their coronation, and fought under William at the Boyne.

The 1695 English general election was the first to be held under the terms of the Triennial Act of 1694, which required parliament to be dissolved and fresh elections called at least every three years. This measure helped to fuel partisan rivalry over the coming decades, with the electorate in a constant state of excitement and the Whigs and Tories continually trying to gain the upper hand. Despite the potential for manipulation of the electorate, as was seen under Robert Walpole and his successors, with general elections held an average of every other year, and local and central government positions frequently changing hands between parties, it was impossible for any party or government to be certain of electoral success in the period after 1694, and election results were consequently genuinely representative of the views of at least the section of the population able to vote.

After six years absence, Proby was returned to Parliament on his own account as MP for Huntingdonshire at a by-election on 31 January 1708 and was re-elected at the 1708 British general election. He stood as an independent, determined to avoid party entanglements, and voted against the impeachment of Dr Sacheverell in 1710. In spite of this, the Earl of Manchester returned him again at the 1710 British general election. [2]

1708 British general election

The 1708 British general election was the first general election to be held after the Acts of Union had united the Parliaments of England and Scotland.

1710 British general election

The 1710 British general election produced a landslide victory for the Tories in the wake of the prosecution of Henry Sacheverell and the collapse of the previous Whig government led by Godolphin and the Whig Junto. In November 1709 the clergyman Henry Sacheverell had delivered a sermon fiercely criticising the government's policy of toleration for Protestant dissenters and attacking the personal conduct of the ministers. The government had Sacherevell impeached, and he was narrowly found guilty but received only a light sentence, making the government appear weak and vindictive; the trial enraged a large section of the population, and riots in London led to attacks on dissenting places of worship and cries of "Church in Danger".

Death and legacy

Proby died on 14 November 1710, aged 71, before the Parliament sat again, and was buried at Elton. He left his unmarried daughter his personal estate, valued at £10,000, together with another £5,000, to be raised by selling property at Old Weston and from rents of his other Huntingdonshire manors. Elton Hall, to which he had added a wing, descended first to his cousin William Proby, governor of Fort St George, and eventually to William's grandson, John Proby, 1st Baron Carysfort.

John Proby, 1st Baron Carysfort British politician

John Proby, 1st Baron Carysfort KB PC was a British Whig politician.

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References

  1. "Proby, John (PRBY657J)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  2. 1 2 3 4 "PROBY, John (1639-1710), of the Middle Temple and Elton Hall, Hunts". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 4 July 2019.
  3. John Burke, John Bernard Burke A genealogical and heraldic history of the extinct and dormant baronetcies"
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Robert Montagu
John Dryden
Member of Parliament for Huntingdonshire
16931695
With: John Dryden
Succeeded by
Heneage Montagu
Anthony Hammond
Preceded by
Anthony Hammond
Robert Apreece
Member of Parliament for Huntingdonshire
16981702
With: Robert Throckmorton 16981699
John Dryden 16991702
Succeeded by
John Dryden
William Naylor
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
John Dryden
John Pocklington
Member of Parliament for Huntingdonshire
17081710
With: John Pocklington
Succeeded by
John Pocklington
Sir John Cotton