John Ridgely

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John Ridgely
John Ridgely in Destination Tokyo trailer.jpg
Ridgely in the trailer for Destination Tokyo (1943)
Born
John Huntington Rea

(1909-09-06)September 6, 1909
DiedJanuary 18, 1968(1968-01-18) (aged 58)
New York City, U.S.
Alma mater Stanford University
OccupationActor
Years active1935–1954
SpouseVirginia Robinson [1]

John Ridgely (born John Huntington Rea, [2] September 6, 1909 – January 18, 1968) was an American film character actor with over 175 film credits. [3]

Contents

Early years

Ridgely was born in Chicago, Illinois, [4] the son of John Ridgely Rea. Ridgely's elementary schooling was in Hinsdale, Illinois, and he attended Kemper Military School in Boonville, Missouri. [5] He also attended Stanford University before his debut in movies. [6]

Film

He appeared in the 1946 Humphrey Bogart film The Big Sleep as blackmailing gangster Eddie Mars and had a pivotal role as a suffering heart patient in the film noir Nora Prentiss (1947). His most prominent other roles were his top-billed part as the bomber captain in Howard Hawks's Air Force and as real-life fighter pilot Tex Hill in 1945's God is My Co-Pilot .

The Chicago-born actor appeared in a large number of other films, particularly for Warner Bros., in the 1930s and 1940s. [7]

Freelancing after 1948, Ridgely continued to essay general-purpose parts until he left films in 1953; thereafter, he worked in summer-theater productions and television until his death from a heart attack at the age of 58 in 1968. [8]

Selected filmography

Radio appearances

YearProgramEpisode/source
1938Warner Brothers Academy Theater Special Agent [9]

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References

  1. "Hollywood Movie Actor John Ridgely Biography, News, Photos, Videos".
  2. Room, Adrian (2010). Dictionary of Pseudonyms: 13,000 Assumed Names and Their Origins, 5th ed. McFarland. p. 406. ISBN   9780786457632 . Retrieved January 20, 2017.
  3. John Ridgely Roles Now Number 175, The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, October 2, 1951, p. 6
  4. Katz, Ephraim (1979). The Film Encyclopedia: The Most Comprehensive Encyclopedia of World Cinema in a Single Volume. Perigee Books. ISBN   0-399-50601-2. P. 973.
  5. Dudley, Fredda (August 1943). "Man with a Future". Screenland. XLVII (4): 25–29, 62. Retrieved March 31, 2017.
  6. John Ridgely Roles Now Number 175, The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, October 2, 1951, p. 6
  7. John Ridgely Roles Now Number 175, The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, October 2, 1951, p. 6
  8. Willis, John, Screen World, 1969, Vol. 20, London: Frederick Muller Ltd, p. 239
  9. "Those Were the Days". Nostalgia Digest. 39 (1): 32–41. Winter 2013.