John Rutledge

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  1. While Rutledge was the 31st Governor of South Carolina, he was the first governor under the United States independent from Great Britain. He was also officially titled the President of South Carolina during his first term.

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">John Rutledge Supreme Court nominations</span>

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Justices 1789 to Present". Washington, D.C.: Supreme Court of the United States. Archived from the original on April 15, 2010. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  2. "John Rutledge, 1795". supremecourthistory.org. Supreme Court Historical Society. Retrieved November 12, 2022.
  3. Flanders, Henry (1874). The Lives and Times of the Chief Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States. Vol. 1. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott & Co. pp. 432–433. Archived from the original on April 26, 2016. Retrieved April 29, 2008.
  4. Flanders 438–439
  5. Flanders 447–448
  6. Fradin, Dennis Brindell (2005). The Founders: The 39 Stories behind the U.S. Constitution. New York City: Walker Publishing Company, Inc. p. 90.
  7. Flanders 451
  8. "South Carolina, Charleston City Death Records, 1821-1926". FamilySearch. December 17, 2019. Archived from the original on November 5, 2021. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  9. Webber, Mabel (1930). "Dr John Rutledge and his descendants". South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine. 31 (1): 7–25. JSTOR   27569816.
  10. 1 2 "John Rutledge (U.S. National Park Service)". www.nps.gov. National Park Service. Retrieved April 16, 2022.
  11. Flanders 460
  12. Flanders 463–464
  13. Hartley, Cecil B. (1860). Heroes and Patriots of the South. Philadelphia: G. G. Evans. p.  294 . Retrieved April 30, 2008.
  14. Flanders 481–482
  15. 1 2 Hartley 296–297
  16. Fradin 91
  17. Horton 142
  18. Fradin 91–92
  19. Flanders 551
  20. 1 2 Flanders 561
  21. Flanders 561–564
  22. Flanders 568–569
  23. Flanders 573
  24. Flanders 576–577
  25. Flanders 588–589
  26. 1 2 Flanders 602
  27. Madison, James (1893). E. H. Scott (ed.). Journal of the Federal Convention. Chicago: Albert, Scott, and Co. passim. Retrieved May 11, 2008.
  28. 1 2 Stewart, David. The Summer of 1787. p168
  29. Flanders 604
  30. Flanders 606
  31. Flanders 607
  32. Flanders 609–610
  33. 1 2 "Supreme Court Nominations: present-1789". Washington, D.C.: United States Senate. Archived from the original on December 9, 2020. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  34. Flanders 622
  35. 1 2 3 "Chief Justice Nomination Rejected". Washington, D.C.: United States Senate. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  36. 1 2 Fisher, Louis (September 5, 2001). Recess Appointments of Federal Judges (PDF) (Report). Washington, D.C.: Congressional Research Service. Retrieved April 26, 2022 via UNT Digital Library.
  37. Independent Chronicle (Boston). August 13, 1795, reprinted in Marcus, Maeva, and Perry, James Russell. The Documentary History of the Supreme Court of the United States, 1789–1800 Archived April 28, 2016, at the Wayback Machine p. 780
  38. "4th Congress Senate Vote 18 (1795)". voteview.com. Retrieved March 28, 2022.
  39. Wermiel, Stephen (February 15, 2013). "SCOTUS for law students (sponsored by Bloomberg Law): Recess appointments and the Court". SCOTUSblog, Supreme Court of the United States. Archived from the original on January 17, 2018. Retrieved January 16, 2018.
  40. Flanders 642
  41. Haw, James. John and Edward Rutledge of South Carolina Archived May 29, 2016, at the Wayback Machine (University of Georgia Press 1997).
  42. "John Rutledge". Oyez . Archived from the original on October 21, 2017. Retrieved March 21, 2018.
  43. "Sheriff's spokesman: Supreme Court Historical Society: John Rutledge". December 5, 2009. Archived from the original on December 2, 2009. Retrieved December 5, 2009.
  44. Christensen, George A. (1983) "Here Lies the Supreme Court: Gravesites of the Justices, Yearbook". Archived from the original on September 3, 2005. Retrieved November 24, 2013. Supreme Court Historical Society at Internet Archive which erroneously lists the gravesite as being in Colorado.
  45. See also Christensen, George A., "Here Lies the Supreme Court: Revisited", Journal of Supreme Court History, Volume 33 Issue 1, pp. 17–41 (Feb 19, 2008), University of Alabama.
  46. "John Rutledge House Inn History". John Rutledge House Inn. Archived from the original on June 9, 2008. Retrieved May 12, 2008.
  47. Barbash, Fred (August 24, 1987). "SLAVE-TRADE DEBATE RESOLVED ON PRAGMATIC, NOT MORAL, GROUNDS". Washington Post. ISSN   0190-8286 . Retrieved September 13, 2022.
  48. "The Constitution of the United States: A Transcription". National Archives. November 4, 2015. Retrieved September 14, 2022.
  49. Barbash, Fred (August 24, 1987). "SLAVE-TRADE DEBATE RESOLVED ON PRAGMATIC, NOT MORAL, GROUNDS". Washington Post. ISSN   0190-8286 . Retrieved September 14, 2022.
  50. "The Fugitive Slave Clause". Teaching American History. Retrieved September 14, 2022.
  51. "The Constitution of the United States: A Transcription". National Archives. November 4, 2015. Retrieved September 14, 2022.
  52. "Intellectual Founders – Slavery at South Carolina College, 1801–1865". University of South Carolina Libraries. Archived from the original on April 21, 2016. Retrieved October 18, 2016.

Bibliography

Further reading

John Rutledge
John Rutledge color painting.jpg
Portrait by John Trumbull
2nd Chief Justice of the United States
In office
August 12, 1795 [1]  December 28, 1795
Political offices
New office President of South Carolina
1776–1778
Succeeded by
Preceded by Governor of South Carolina
1779–1782
Succeeded by
Legal offices
New seat Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States
1789–1791
Succeeded by
Preceded by Chief Justice of the United States
1795
Succeeded by