John S. Phelps

Last updated
John S. Phelps
John smith phelps.jpg
23rd Governor of Missouri
In office
January 8, 1877 January 10, 1881
Lieutenant Henry C. Brockmeyer
Preceded by Charles Henry Hardin
Succeeded by Thomas T. Crittenden
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Missouri's 6th district
In office
March 4, 1853 March 3, 1863
Preceded byDistrict created
Succeeded by Austin A. King
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Missouri's at-large and 5th district
In office
March 4, 1845 (at-large) March 3, 1853 (5th)
Preceded by James Madison Hughes (at-large)
Succeeded by John G. Miller (5th)
Member of the Missouri House of Representatives
In office
1840-1844
Personal details
Born(1814-12-22)December 22, 1814
Simsbury, Connecticut
DiedNovember 20, 1886(1886-11-20) (aged 71)
St. Louis, Missouri
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s)Mary Whitney
ProfessionAttorney

John Smith Phelps (December 22, 1814 November 20, 1886) was a politician, soldier during the American Civil War, and the 23rd Governor of Missouri.

Contents

Early life and career

John Smith Phelps, the son of Elisha Phelps, was born in Simsbury, Hartford County, Connecticut. He attended common schools and then studied law at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, graduating in 1832. He was admitted to the bar in 1835 and commenced practice in Simsbury. After his marriage to Mary Whitney on April 20, 1837, [1] he moved to Springfield, Missouri, and quickly became one of the leading lawyers in southwest Missouri.

Phelps was elected to the Missouri House of Representatives in 1840. Four years later, on March 4, 1845, he was elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-Ninth Congress, and to eight succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1845 March 3, 1863). During his 18-year term, he served as Chairman of the Committee on Ways and Means (Thirty-Fifth Congress) and came to be regarded as a champion of government bounties to soldiers, aid to railroads, and inexpensive postage.

Phelps was popular in Washington, D.C. and at home. In 1857 Missourians honored him by naming the newly created county of Phelps after him. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1862.

Civil War

At the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, Phelps returned to Springfield and enlisted as a private in Captain Coleman's Company of Missouri Infantry (Union). He was promoted to lieutenant colonel on October 2, 1861 and to colonel December 19, 1861. Following the Union defeat at the Battle of Wilson's Creek, Mary Phelps cared for the body of General Nathaniel Lyon, killed during the battle, while her husband retreated with the Union army to Rolla. By special arrangement with President Abraham Lincoln, Phelps organized an infantry regiment which bore his name, Phelps’s Regiment, Missouri Volunteer Infantry. The regiment spent most of the winter of 186162 as the garrison of Fort Wyman at Rolla. In March 1862, Phelps led his regiment in the fierce fighting at Pea Ridge in Arkansas. He was mustered out May 13, 1862. In July 1862, he was appointed by President Lincoln as Military Governor of Arkansas, but he resigned the position due to ill health.

Postbellum activities

Phelps returned to Springfield in 1864 to resume his law practice. He was an unsuccessful candidate for Governor of Missouri in 1868, but in 1876 was elected to the position as the only candidate who could successfully lead Northern and Southern factions in the state. During his tenure as governor, Phelps supported currency reform and increased support for public education. He retired in 1881, praised as one of Missouri’s best governors.

John Smith Phelps died in St. Louis, Missouri. He rests in Hazelwood Cemetery in Springfield, Missouri.

See also

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References

  1. "John S. Phelps and Mary Whitney". Connecticut, Marriages, 1729-1867. Family Search. Retrieved 12 Mar 2014.
Party political offices
Preceded by
Thomas Lawson Price
Democratic nominee for Governor of Missouri
1868
Succeeded by
Benjamin Gratz Brown
Preceded by
Charles Henry Hardin
Democratic nominee for Governor of Missouri
1876
Succeeded by
Thomas Theodore Crittenden
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
James Madison Hughes
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Missouri's 5th congressional district

18451853
Succeeded by
John Gaines Miller
Preceded by
None
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Missouri's 6th congressional district

18531863
Succeeded by
Austin Augustus King
Political offices
Preceded by
Charles Henry Hardin
Governor of Missouri
1877–1881
Succeeded by
Thomas T. Crittenden