John Savile Lumley-Savile, 2nd Baron Savile

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"Rufford Abbey"
John Savile Lumley-Savile (2nd Baron Savile) caricatured by Spy in Vanity Fair, 15 April 1908. John Lumley-Savile, Vanity Fair, 1908-04-15.jpg
"Rufford Abbey"
John Savile Lumley-Savile (2nd Baron Savile) caricatured by Spy in Vanity Fair , 15 April 1908.

John Savile Lumley-Savile, 2nd Baron Savile KCVO born with the name John Savile-Lumley, (20 September 1854 [1] [2] [3] – 3 April 1931) was an English landowner, diplomat, and sportsman. [4]

John Savile-Lumley was the son of the Rev. Frederick Savile-Lumley, Rector of Bilsthorpe and nephew of John Savile (1818–1896). The latter was raised to the peerage in 1888 as Baron Savile, of Rufford in the County of Nottingham, with remainder to his nephew John Savile-Lumley (later Lumley-Savile). Lord Savile died in November 1896, aged 78 and was succeeded in the Barony, according to the special remainder, by his nephew John Savile Lumley-Savile, 2nd Baron Savile, who in 1898 assumed by royal license the name of Savile after Lumley. [1]

Bilsthorpe is a village in the Newark and Sherwood district of Nottinghamshire, England. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 3,076, increasing to 3,375 at the 2011 Census. It is about five miles south of Ollerton, and near the junction of the A614 and A617.

John Savile, 1st Baron Savile,, was a British diplomat who served as Ambassador to Italy from 1883 to 1888.

Baron Savile

Baron Savile, of Rufford in the County of Nottingham, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1888 for the diplomat Sir John Savile. He was the eldest of the five illegitimate children of John Lumley-Savile, 8th Earl of Scarbrough, and the grandson of John Lumley-Savile, 7th Earl of Scarbrough. The latter was the fourth of the seven sons of Richard Lumley-Saunderson, 4th Earl of Scarbrough, and his wife Barbara, sister and heiress of the politician Sir George Savile, 8th and last Baronet, of Thornhill, who bequeathed the substantial Savile estates in Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire to his nephew the Hon. Richard Lumley-Saunderson, later 6th Earl of Scarbrough. On his death the estates passed to his younger brother, the aforementioned seventh Earl, and then to his son the eighth Earl. The latter bequeathed the estates to his second natural son Captain Henry Lumley-Savile. When he died they passed to his younger brother Augustus William Lumley-Savile (1829–1887) and then to his eldest brother, the aforementioned John Savile, who was created Baron Savile the following year.

After education at Eton, John Savile-Lumley joined Her Majesty's Diplomatic Service. He was nominated Attaché at Brussels in 1874, became 2nd Secretary in Athens in 1879, exchanged into the Foreign Office in 1881, and retired in 1889. In the early 1900s he owned about 33,900 acres, comprising the family estates in Nottinghamshire and the West Riding of Yorkshire. He enjoyed shooting, fishing, and golf. [4]

Eton College British independent boarding school located in Eton

Eton College is an English 13–18 independent boarding school and sixth form for boys in the parish of Eton, near Windsor in Berkshire. It was founded in 1440 by King Henry VI as The King's College of Our Lady of Eton besides Wyndsor, as a sister institution to King's College, Cambridge, making it the 18th-oldest Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference school.

Her Majestys Diplomatic Service diplomatic service of the United Kingdom

Her Majesty's Diplomatic Service (HMDS) is the diplomatic service of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, dealing with foreign affairs, as opposed to the Home Civil Service, which deals with domestic affairs. It employs around 14,000 people, roughly one-third of whom are crown servants working directly for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, either in London or abroad. The remaining two thirds of staff are employed locally by one of nearly 270 British diplomatic missions abroad. The Permanent Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs is also the Head of the Diplomatic Service.

Nottinghamshire County of England

Nottinghamshire is a county in the East Midlands region of England, bordering South Yorkshire to the north-west, Lincolnshire to the east, Leicestershire to the south, and Derbyshire to the west. The traditional county town is Nottingham, though the county council is based in West Bridgford in the borough of Rushcliffe, at a site facing Nottingham over the River Trent.

He was a Justice of the Peace for Nottinghamshire and in 1904 was made KVOC. [4] He married in 1894 but his first wife died in 1912 without issue. He married for the second time in 1916; the marriage produced George Halifax Lumley-Savile, heir to the title. [5] Henry Lumley-Savile (1923–2001) was the younger son from the marriage. [6]

George Halifax Lumley-Savile, 3rd Baron Savile was an English landowner, member of the House of Lords, and president of the Country Landowners Association.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Savile, Baron". Debrett's Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage, and Companionage. London: Dean & Son. 1902. p. 724.
  2. Many sources and some of the Who's Who volumes list 1853 as the year of birth, but Debrett's seems to have the correct year. "Savile, 2nd Baron (cr. 1888), John Savile Lumley-Savile". Who's Who: 1964. 1916.
  3. Wikisource-logo.svg Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Savile, Sir George"  . Encyclopædia Britannica . 24 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 243.
  4. 1 2 3 "Savile, 2nd Baron (cr. 1888), John Savile Lumley-Savile". Who's Who: 1852. 1914.
  5. Hesilrige, Arthur G. M., ed. (1920). "Savile, Baron". Debrett's Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage, and Companionage. London: Dean & Son. p. 795.
  6. "Obituary. Henry Lumley-Savile". The Independent. 7 May 2001.
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
John Savile
Baron Savile
1896–1931
Succeeded by
George Lumley-Savile