John Stiegman

Last updated
John Stiegman
Biographical details
Born(1922-12-16)December 16, 1922
Princeton, New Jersey
DiedOctober 31, 2006(2006-10-31) (aged 83)
Princeton, New Jersey
Playing career
1942 Williams
Position(s) Tackle
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1946–1955 Princeton (assistant)
1956–1959 Rutgers
1960–1964 Penn
1965 Pittsburgh (assistant)
1970–1972 Iowa Wesleyan (DC)
1973 Iowa Wesleyan
1974 Army (assistant)
Head coaching record
Overall37–53
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
2 Middle Three (1958–1959)
1 Middle Atlantic (1958)

John R. Stiegman (December 16, 1922 – October 31, 2006) was an American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Rutgers University (1956–1959), the University of Pennsylvania (1960–1964) and Iowa Wesleyan College (1973), compiling a career college football record of 37–53.

Contents

Stiegman was born in Princeton, New Jersey, and attended Williams College. He played tackle on the Williams College football team and was also a member of the hockey, lacrosse and swimming teams at Williams. [1] He graduated from Williams in 1944. [2]

Stiegman was an assistant football coach, freshman hockey coach at Princeton University from 1946 to 1955. [1] He was the head football coach at Rutgers from 1956 to 1959 where he compiled a record of 22–15. [2] [3] Rutgers posted an 8–1 record in 1958. [2] In 1960, Stiegman became the head football coach at Penn. He was the head coach at Penn through the 1964 season and compiled a record of 12 wins and 33 losses. [4] He was removed as head coach at Penn after his fifth straight losing season. [5]

Stiegman was an assistant coach at the University of Pittsburgh in 1965. [6] He was hired by Iowa Wesleyan College in 1967 to assist in building a new athletic complex, [7] and became the school's athletic director in 1970. He also served as the defensive coordinator of the football team from 1970 to 1972 and took over as head football coach in 1973. [8] He led Iowa Wesleyan to a record of 3–5 in his only season as head football coach. [6] In 1974, he left Iowa Wesleyan to accept a position as an assistant football coach at the United States Military Academy.

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffsAP#
Rutgers Scarlet Knights (Middle Three Conference)(1956–1957)
1956 Rutgers 3–71–12nd
1957 Rutgers 5–41–12nd
Rutgers Scarlet Knights (Middle Atlantic Conference / Middle Three Conference)(1958–1959)
1958 Rutgers 8–14–0 / 2–01st (University) / 1st20
1959 Rutgers 6–32–2 / 2–0T–4th (University) / 1st
Rutgers:22–158–4
Penn Quakers (Ivy League)(1960–1964)
1960 Penn 3–62–56th
1961 Penn 2–71–67th
1962 Penn 3–62–56th
1963 Penn 3–61–68th
1964 Penn 1–80–78th
Penn:12–336–29
Iowa Wesleyan Tigers (NAIA Division II independent)(1973)
1973 Iowa Wesleyan3–5
Iowa Wesleyan:3–5
Total:37–53

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References

  1. 1 2 "Stiegman To Coach Rutgers". Pacific Stars and Stripes. January 23, 1956.
  2. 1 2 3 "Former RU Football Coach John Stiegman Passes Away". Rutgers University. November 4, 2006. Archived from the original on October 1, 2011.
  3. "Stiegman Named Coach At Rutgers". The New York Times. January 26, 1956.
  4. "John Stiegman Records by Year". College Football Data Warehouse.
  5. "Stiegman Ousted After Five Years As Coach At Penn". The New York Times. December 6, 1964.
  6. 1 2 White, Maury (February 27, 1974). "From Iowa Wesleyan To West Point: Back At It for Stiegman". Des Moines Register.
  7. "Stiegman On Job". Burlington Hawk-Eye. September 3, 1967.
  8. "Iowa Wesleyan AD Also Takes Football Job". Waterloo Daily Courier. January 21, 1973.