John Surtees

Last updated

John Surtees
CBE
John Surtees.JPG
Surtees sitting in his Ferrari signing autographs at Brands Hatch in 1964
NationalityBritish
Born(1934-02-11)11 February 1934
Tatsfield, Surrey, England
Died10 March 2017(2017-03-10) (aged 83)
St George's Hospital, Tooting, London, England
Motorcycle racing career statistics
Grand Prix motorcycle racing
Active years 19521960
First race 1952 500cc Ulster Grand Prix
Last race 1960 500cc Nations Grand Prix
First win 1955 250cc Ulster Grand Prix
Last win 1960 500cc Nations Grand Prix
Team(s) Norton, MV Agusta
Championships 350cc – 1958, 1959, 1960
500cc – 1956, 1958, 1959, 1960
StartsWinsPodiums Poles F. laps Points
513845N/A34350
Formula One World Championship career
Active years 19601972
Teams Lotus, Cooper (Inc non-works), Lola, Ferrari, Honda, BRM,
non-works McLaren, Surtees
Entries113 (111 starts)
Championships 1 (1964)
Wins 6
Podiums24
Career points180
Pole positions 8
Fastest laps 11
First entry 1960 Monaco Grand Prix
First win 1963 German Grand Prix
Last win 1967 Italian Grand Prix
Last entry 1972 Italian Grand Prix
24 Hours of Le Mans career
Years 19631965, 1967
Teams Scuderia Ferrari
Lola Cars/Team Surtees
Best finish3rd (1964)
Class wins0

John Surtees, CBE (11 February 1934 – 10 March 2017) was an English Grand Prix motorcycle road racer and Formula One driver. He was a four-time 500cc motorcycle World Champion – winning that title in 1956, 1958, 1959 and 1960 – the Formula One World Champion in 1964, and remains the only person to have won World Championships on both two and four wheels. He founded the Surtees Racing Organisation team that competed as a constructor in Formula One, Formula 2 and Formula 5000 from 1970 to 1978. He was also the ambassador of the Racing Steps Foundation.

Grand Prix motorcycle racing premier championship of motorcycle road racing

Grand Prix motorcycle racing refers to the premier class of motorcycle road racing events held on road circuits sanctioned by FIM. Independent motorcycle racing events have been held since the start of the twentieth century and large national events were often given the title Grand Prix, The foundation of a recognised international governing body for motorcycle sport, the Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme in 1949 provided the opportunity to coordinate rules and regulations in order that selected events could count towards official World Championships as FIM Road Racing World Championship Grand Prix. It is the oldest established motorsport world championship.

Road racing

Road racing is a form of motorsport racing held on a paved road surfaces. The races can be held either on a closed circuit or on a street circuit utilizing temporarily closed public roads. Originally, road races were held almost entirely on public roads however, public safety concerns eventually led to most races being held on purpose built racing circuits.

Formula One is the highest class of single-seater auto racing sanctioned by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) and owned by the Formula One Group. The FIA Formula One World Championship has been one of the premier forms of racing around the world since its inaugural season in 1950. The word "formula" in the name refers to the set of rules to which all participants' cars must conform. A Formula One season consists of a series of races, known as Grands Prix, which take place worldwide on purpose-built circuits and on public roads.

Contents

Motorcycle racing career

Surtees was the son of a south London motorcycle dealer. [1] His father Jack Surtees was an accomplished grasstrack competitor and in 1948 was the South Eastern Centre Sidecar Champion. [2] He had his first professional outing, which they won, in the sidecar of his father's Vincent at the age of 14. [1] However, when race officials discovered Surtees's age, they were disqualified. [1] He entered his first race at 15 in a grasstrack competition. In 1950, at the age of 16, he went to work for the Vincent factory as an apprentice. [1] [3] He first gained prominence in 1951 when he gave Norton star Geoff Duke a strong challenge in an ACU race at the Thruxton Circuit. [1]

London Capital of the United Kingdom

London is the capital of and largest city in England and the United Kingdom, and the largest city in the European Union. Standing on the River Thames in the south-east of England, at the head of its 50-mile (80 km) estuary leading to the North Sea, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. Londinium was founded by the Romans. The City of London, London's ancient core − an area of just 1.12 square miles (2.9 km2) and colloquially known as the Square Mile − retains boundaries that follow closely its medieval limits. The City of Westminster is also an Inner London borough holding city status. Greater London is governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly.

Grasstrack

Motorcycle Grasstrack is a form of motorcycle racing which typically, in its current form, takes place on a flat track consisting of two straights and two bends usually constructed in a field. It is one of the oldest types of motorcycle sports in the UK with the first meetings having taken place in the 1920s.

Geoff Duke British motorcycle racer

Geoffrey Ernest Duke was a British multiple motorcycle Grand Prix road racing world champion. Born in St. Helens, Lancashire, after retirement from competition he was a businessman based in the Isle of Man. He raced several brands of motorcycle: Norton, Gilera, BMW, NSU and Benelli.

In 1955, Norton race chief Joe Craig gave Surtees his first factory sponsored ride aboard the Nortons. [1] He finished the year by beating reigning world champion Duke at Silverstone and then at Brands Hatch. [1] However, with Norton in financial trouble and uncertain about their racing plans, Surtees accepted an offer to race for the MV Agusta factory racing team, where he soon earned the nickname figlio del vento (son of the wind). [4]

The 1955 Grand Prix motorcycle racing season was the seventh F.I.M. Road Racing World Championship Grand Prix season. The season consisted of eight Grand Prix races in five classes: 500cc, 350cc, 250cc, 125cc and Sidecars 500cc. It began on 1 May, with Spanish Grand Prix and ended with Nations Grand Prix in Italy on 4 September.

Norton Motorcycle Company British motorcycle marque

The Norton Motorcycle Company is an English motorcycle marque, originally from Birmingham, England, UK. It was founded in 1898 as a manufacturer of "fittings and parts for the two-wheel trade". By 1902 the company had begun manufacturing motorcycles with bought-in engines. In 1908 a Norton-built engine was added to the range. This began a long series of production of single and eventually twin-cylinder motorcycles, and a long history of racing involvement.

Silverstone Circuit motor racing circuit on the Buckinghamshire and Northamptonshire border, UK

Silverstone Circuit is a motor racing circuit in England located next to the Northamptonshire villages of Silverstone and Whittlebury. The circuit straddles the Northamptonshire and Buckinghamshire border, with the current main circuit entry on the Buckinghamshire side. The Northamptonshire towns of Towcester and Brackley and Buckinghamshire town of Buckingham are close by, and the nearest large towns are Northampton and Milton Keynes.

In 1956 Surtees won the 500cc world championship, [5] MV Agusta's first in the senior class. [4] In this Surtees was assisted by the FIM's decision to ban the defending champion, Geoff Duke, for six months because of his support for a riders' strike for more starting money. [6] In the 1957 season, the MV Agustas were no match for the Gileras and Surtees battled to a third-place finish aboard a 1957 MV Agusta 500 Quattro. [1] [5] [7]

The 1956 Grand Prix motorcycle racing season was the eighth F.I.M. Road Racing World Championship Grand Prix season. The season consisted of six Grand Prix races in five classes: 500cc, 350cc, 250cc, 125cc and Sidecars 500cc. It began on 8 June, with Isle of Man TT and ended with Nations Grand Prix in Italy on 9 September.

Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme international sport governing body

The Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme is the global governing/sanctioning body of motorcycle racing. It represents 113 national motorcycle federations that are divided into six regional continental unions.

The 1957 Grand Prix motorcycle racing season was the ninth F.I.M. Road Racing World Championship Grand Prix season. The season consisted of six Grand Prix races in five classes: 500cc, 350cc, 250cc, 125cc and Sidecars 500cc. It began on 19 May, with German Grand Prix and ended with Nations Grand Prix in Italy on 1 September.

When Gilera and Moto Guzzi withdrew from Grand Prix racing at the end of 1957, Surtees and MV Agusta went on to dominate the competition in the two larger displacement classes. [1] In 1958, 1959 and 1960, he won 32 out of 39 races and became the first man to win the Senior TT at the Isle of Man TT three years in succession. [5] [8]

Gilera company

Gilera is an Italian motorcycle manufacturer founded in Arcore in 1909 by Giuseppe Gilera. In 1969, the company was purchased by Piaggio.

Moto Guzzi Motorcycles manufacturer

Moto Guzzi is an Italian motorcycle manufacturer and the oldest European manufacturer in continuous motorcycle production.

The 1958 Grand Prix motorcycle racing season was the tenth F.I.M. Road Racing World Championship Grand Prix season. The season consisted of seven Grand Prix races in five classes: 500cc, 350cc, 250cc, 125cc and Sidecars 500cc. It began on 6 June, with Isle of Man TT and ended with Nations Grand Prix in Italy on 14 September.

Auto racing career

Surtees (left) and Mauro Forghieri in 1965 1965-07-30 Surtees u. Forghieri.JPG
Surtees (left) and Mauro Forghieri in 1965
Surtees at the 1965 1000 km Nurburgring. 1965-05-23 07b John Surtees, Ferrari 330P2.jpg
Surtees at the 1965 1000 km Nürburgring.
Surtees and Yoshio Nakamura at the 1968 Dutch Grand Prix. Surtees at 1968 Dutch Grand Prix.jpg
Surtees and Yoshio Nakamura at the 1968 Dutch Grand Prix.
Surtees at the 1969 Dutch Grand Prix Surtees at 1969 Dutch Grand Prix.jpg
Surtees at the 1969 Dutch Grand Prix
Surtees at the wheel of the Surtees TS7. SurteesTS7BarryBoor.jpg
Surtees at the wheel of the Surtees TS7.

While still racing motorcycles full-time, Surtees performed a test drive in Aston Martin's DBR1 sports car in front of team manager Reg Parnell. He however continued on two wheels and did not enter car racing until the following year.

Aston Martin DBR1 type of racing car manufactured by Aston Martin

The Aston Martin DBR1 was a sports racing car built by Aston Martin starting in 1956, intended for the World Sportscar Championship as well as non-championship sportscar races at the time. It is most famous as the victor of the 1959 24 Hours of Le Mans, Aston Martin's only outright victory at the endurance classic. It is one of only three cars in the 1950s to win both the World Sports Car Championship and Le Mans 24 Hours in the same year. In addition the six World Sports Car Championship victories was a record for any car in the 1950s and remained a record in the championship until surpassed by the Ferrari 250TR. The three consecutive triumphs in 1959 at the Nürburgring, Le Mans and the Tourist Trophy equalled the record set by the Ferrari 250TR with its three consecutive victories at the start of the 1958 season.

In 1960, at the age of 26, Surtees switched from motorcycles to cars full-time, making his Formula 1 debut racing in the 1960 BRDC International Trophy [9] at Silverstone for Team Lotus. [10] He made an immediate impact with a second-place finish in only his second Formula One World Championship race, at the 1960 British Grand Prix, and a pole position at his third, the 1960 Portuguese Grand Prix. [3]

After spending the 1961 season with the Yeoman Credit Racing Team driving a Cooper T53 "Lowline" managed by Reg Parnell and the 1962 season with the Bowmaker Racing Team, still managed by Reg Parnell but now in the V8 Lola Mk4, he moved to Scuderia Ferrari in 1963 and won the World Championship for the Italian team in 1964. [3] [11]

On 25 September 1965, Surtees had a life-threatening accident at the Mosport Park Circuit (Ontario, Canada) while practising in a Lola T70 sports racing car. [3] A front upright casting had broken. A.J. Baime in his book Go Like Hell says Surtees came out of the crash with one side of his body four inches shorter than the other. [12] Doctors set most of the breaks nonsurgically, in part by physically stretching his shattered body until the right-left discrepancy was under an inch – and there it stayed.

The 1966 season saw the introduction of new, larger 3-litre engines to Formula One. [13] Surtees's debut with Ferrari's new F1 car was at the 1966 BRDC International Trophy at Silverstone, where he qualified and finished a close second behind Jack Brabham's 3-litre Brabham BT19. [14] A few weeks later, Surtees led the Monaco Grand Prix, pulling away from Jackie Stewart's 2-litre BRM on the straights, before the engine failed. A fortnight later Surtees survived the first lap rainstorm which eliminated half the field and won the Belgian Grand Prix. [15]

Due to perennial strikes in Italy, Ferrari could afford to enter only two cars (Ferrari P3s) for the 1966 24 Hours of Le Mans instead of its usual entry of three prototypes. Uncertainty and confusion surrounds subsequent events and their consequences, and a number of different explanations have been offered in the decades since. The narrative explained by Ferrari at the time states that under Le Mans rules in 1966 each car was allowed only two drivers. [16] Surtees was omitted from the driver line-up [16] with one works Ferrari to be driven by Mike Parkes and Ludovico Scarfiotti, and the other by Jean Guichet and Lorenzo Bandini. When Surtees questioned Ferrari team manager Eugenio Dragoni as to why, as the Ferrari team leader, he would not be allowed to compete, Dragoni told Surtees that he did not feel that he was fully fit to drive in a 24-hour endurance race because of the injuries he had sustained in late 1965. [16] However, Surtees himself described things somewhat differently. In his recollection, when the pairings were announced he was to drive alongside Scarfiotti. As the faster driver of the two, Surtees argued that he should take the first stint and "try to break" the Ford opposition by driving "flat out from the start". [17] Dragoni denied Surtees's request and insisted that Scarfiotti take the start, supposedly to please Fiat chairman Gianni Agnelli, Scarfiotti's uncle, who was in attendance as a spectator. [17] Either way, the decision and subsequent lack of support from Enzo Ferrari himself were deeply upsetting to Surtees and he immediately quit the team. [16] This decision likely cost both Ferrari and Surtees the Formula 1 Championship in 1966. Ferrari finished second to Brabham-Repco in the Constructors' Championship and Surtees finished second to Jack Brabham in the Drivers' Championship. [3] [18] Surtees finished the season driving for the Cooper-Maserati team, winning the last race of the season. [19]

Surtees competed with a T70 in the inaugural 1966 Can-Am season, [20] [21] winning three races of six to become champion [22] over other winners Dan Gurney (Lola), Mark Donohue (Lola) and Phil Hill (Chaparral) as well as the likes of Bruce McLaren and Chris Amon (both in McLarens). [23]

In December 1966, Surtees signed for Honda. [24] After a promising third place in the first race in South Africa, the Honda RA273 hit a series of mechanical problems. The car was replaced by the Honda RA300 for the Italian Grand Prix, where Surtees slipstreamed Jack Brabham to take Honda's second F1 victory by 0.2 seconds. Surtees finished fourth in the 1967 Drivers' Championship. [11]

The same year, Surtees drove in the Rex Mays 300 at Riverside, near Los Angeles, in a United States Auto Club season-ending road race. This event pitted the best American drivers of the day — normally those who had cut their teeth as professional drivers on oval dirt tracks — against veteran Formula One Grand Prix drivers, including Jim Clark and Dan Gurney. [25]

In 1970, Surtees formed his own race team, the Surtees Racing Organisation, and spent nine seasons competing in Formula 5000, Formula 2 and Formula 1 as a constructor. [3] He retired from competitive driving in 1972, the same year the team had their greatest success when Mike Hailwood won the European Formula 2 Championship. [26] The team was finally disbanded at the end of 1978. [27]

After Formula One

John Surtees in 2011 John Surtees at Goodwood Revival 2011 (cropped).jpg
John Surtees in 2011

For a while in the 1970s Surtees ran a motorcycle shop in West Wickham, Kent, and a Honda car dealership in Edenbridge, Kent. [28] He continued his involvement in motorcycling, participating in classic events with bikes from his stable of vintage racing machines. He also remained involved in single-seater racing cars and held the position of chairman of A1 Team Great Britain, in the A1 Grand Prix racing series from 2005 to 2007. [29] His son, Henry Surtees, competed in the FIA Formula 2 Championship, Formula Renault UK Championship and the Formula BMW UK championship for Carlin Motorsport, [30] before he died while racing in the Formula 2 championship at Brands Hatch on 19 July 2009. [31] In 2010, [32] Surtees founded the Henry Surtees Foundation in his son's memory, as a charitable organization to assist victims of accidental brain injuries and to promote safety in driving and motorsport. [33] [34]

In 1996, Surtees was inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame. [35] The FIM honoured him as a Grand Prix "Legend" in 2003. [36] Already a Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE), he was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in the 2008 Birthday Honours [37] and a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2016 New Year Honours for services to motorsport. [38] [39] [40]

In 2013 he was awarded the 2012 Segrave Trophy in recognition of multiple world championships, and being the only person to win world titles on 2 and 4 wheels. [41]

In 2015, he was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Engineering by Oxford Brookes University. [42] [43]

John Surtees and his second wife Janis Sheara. JanisJones IMG 6844.jpg
John Surtees and his second wife Janis Sheara.

Personal life and death

Surtees married three times, first to Patricia Burke in 1962; the couple divorced in 1979. His second wife was Janis Sheara, whom he married in 1979 and they divorced in 1982. Jane Sparrow was his third wife, whom he married in 1987, and with whom he had three children, Leonora, Edwina and Henry. [44]

Surtees died of respiratory failure on 10 March 2017 at St George's Hospital in London, at the age of 83. [29] [38] He was buried, next to his son Henry, at St. Peter and St. Paul's Church in Lingfield, Surrey.

A tribute to Surtees was held at the Goodwood Members Meeting on 19 March 2017. [45]

Racing record

Motorcycle Grand Prix results

Position123456
Points864321

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearClassTeam123456789PointsRankWins
1952 500cc Norton SUI IOM NED BEL GER ULS
6
NAT ESP 118th0
1953 125cc EMC IOM
DNS
NED GER ULS NAT ESP 00
350cc Norton IOM
DNS
NED BEL GER FRA ULS SUI NAT 00
500cc Norton IOM
DNS
NED BEL GER FRA ULS SUI NAT ESP 00
1954 350cc Norton FRA IOM
11
ULS
Ret
BEL NED GER SUI NAT ESP 00
500cc Norton FRA IOM
15
ULS
5 †
BEL NED GER SUI NAT ESP 00
1955 250cc NSU FRA IOM GER
Ret
NED ULS
1
NAT 87th1
350cc Norton IOM
4
GER
3
BEL NED ULS
3
NAT 116th0
500cc Norton ESP FRA IOM
29
BEL NED ULS NAT 00
BMW GER
Ret
1956 350cc MV Agusta IOM
DSQ
NED
2
BEL
1
GER
Ret
ULS NAT 144th1
500cc MV Agusta IOM
1
NED
1
BEL
1
GER ULS NAT 24 1st 3
1957 350cc MV Agusta GER
Ret
IOM
4
NED
Ret
BEL
Ret
ULS
Ret
NAT
Ret
310th0
500cc MV Agusta GER
Ret
IOM
2
NED
1
BEL
Ret
ULS
Ret
NAT
4
173rd1
1958 350cc MV Agusta IOM
1
NED
1
BEL
1
GER
1
SWE ULS
1
NAT
1
48 1st 6
500cc MV Agusta IOM
1
NED
1
BEL
1
GER
1
SWE ULS
1
NAT
1
48 1st 6
1959 350cc MV Agusta FRA
1
IOM
1
GER
1
SWE
1
ULS
1
NAT
1
48 1st 6
500cc MV Agusta FRA
1
IOM
1
GER
1
NED
1
BEL
1
ULS
1
NAT
1
56 1st 7
1960 350cc MV Agusta FRA
3
IOM
2
NED
1
ULS
1
NAT
Ret
26 1st 2
500cc MV Agusta FRA
1
IOM
1
NED
Ret
BEL
1
GER
1
ULS
2
NAT
1
46 1st 5
Source: [5] [8]

† The 500 cc race was stopped by bad weather, and the FIM excluded the race from the World Championship.

Complete Formula One World Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearEntrantChassisEngine12345678910111213WDC Pts
1960 Team Lotus Lotus 18 Climax FPF 2.5 L4 ARG MON
Ret
500 NED BEL FRA GBR
2
POR
Ret
ITA USA
Ret
14th6
1961 Yeoman Credit Racing Team Cooper T53 Climax FPF 2.5 L4 MON
11
NED
7
BEL
5
FRA
Ret
GBR
Ret
GER
5
ITA
Ret
USA
Ret
12th4
1962 Bowmaker-Yeoman Racing Team Lola Mk4 Climax FWMV 1.5 V8 NED
Ret
MON
4
BEL
5
FRA
5
GBR
2
GER
2
USA
Ret
RSA
Ret
4th19
Lola Mk4A ITA
Ret
1963 Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 156 Ferrari 178 1.5 V6 MON
4
BEL
Ret
NED
3
FRA
Ret
GBR
2
GER
1
ITA
Ret
USA
Ret
MEX
DSQ
RSA
Ret
4th22
1964 Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 158 Ferrari 205B 1.5 V8 MON
Ret
NED
2
BEL
Ret
FRA
Ret
GBR
3
GER
1
AUT
Ret
ITA
1
1st40
North American Racing Team USA
2
MEX
2
1965 Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 158 Ferrari 205B 1.5 V8 RSA
2
MON
4
BEL
Ret
FRA
3
5th17
Ferrari 1512 Ferrari 207 1.5 F12 GBR
3
NED
7
GER
Ret
ITA
Ret
USA MEX
1966 Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 312 Ferrari 218 3.0 V12 MON
Ret
BEL
1
2nd28
Cooper Car Company Cooper T81 Maserati 9/F1 3.0 V12 FRA
Ret
GBR
Ret
NED
Ret
GER
2
ITA
Ret
USA
3
MEX
1
1967 Honda Racing Honda RA273 Honda RA273E 3.0 V12 RSA
3
MON
Ret
NED
Ret
BEL
Ret
FRA GBR
6
GER
4
CAN 4th20
Honda RA300 ITA
1
USA
Ret
MEX
4
1968 Honda Racing Honda RA300 Honda RA273E 3.0 V12 RSA
8
7th12
Honda RA301 Honda RA301E 3.0 V12 ESP
Ret
MON
Ret
BEL
Ret
NED
Ret
FRA
2
GBR
5
GER
Ret
ITA
Ret
CAN
Ret
USA
3
MEX
Ret
1969 Owen Racing Organisation BRM P138 BRM P142 3.0 V12 RSA
Ret
ESP
5
MON
Ret
NED
9
FRA 11th6
BRM P139 GBR
Ret
GER
DNS
ITA
NC
CAN
Ret
USA
3
MEX
Ret
1970 Team Surtees McLaren M7C Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 RSA
Ret
ESP
Ret
MON
Ret
BEL NED
6
FRA 18th3
Surtees TS7 GBR
Ret
GER
9
AUT
Ret
ITA
Ret
CAN
5
USA
Ret
MEX
8
1971 Brooke Bond Oxo Team Surtees Surtees TS9 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 RSA
Ret
ESP
11
MON
7
NED
5
FRA
8
GBR
6
GER
7
AUT
Ret
ITA
Ret
CAN
11
USA
17
19th3
1972 Team Surtees Surtees TS14 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 ARG RSA ESP MON BEL FRA GBR GER AUT ITA
Ret
CAN USA
DNS
NC0
Source: [11] [46]

Non-Championship Formula One results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearEntrantChassisEngine123456789101112131415161718192021
1960 Team Lotus Lotus 18 Climax FPF 2.5 L4 GLV INT
Ret
SIL
6
LOM
Ret
OUL
Ret
1961 Yeoman Credit Racing Team Cooper T53 Climax FPF 2.5 L4 LOM
3
GLV
1
PAU BRX
Ret
VIE AIN
4
SYR
Ret
NAP LON SIL
Ret
SOL KAN
3
DAN
Ret
MOD
Ret
Cooper T56 FLG
Ret
OUL
Ret
LEW VAL RAN NAT RSA
1962 Bowmaker-Yeoman Racing Team Lola Mk4 Climax FPF 2.5 L4 CAP BRX
Ret
LOM
Ret
LAV
Ret
Climax FWMV 1.5 V8 GLV
Ret
PAU AIN
Ret
INT
3
NAP MAL
1
CLP RMS
Ret
SOL OUL
Ret
RAN
3
NAT
Lola Mk4A KAN
Ret
MED DAN
Ret
Lotus 24 MEX
Ret
1963 Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 156 Ferrari 178 1.5 V6 LOM GLV PAU IMO
WD
SYR
WD
AIN INT
Ret
ROM SOL KAN MED
1
AUT OUL RAN
1
1964 Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 158 Ferrari 205B 1.5 V8 DMT NWT SYR
1
AIN SOL
2
MED RAN
Ferrari 178 1.5 V6 INT
Ret
1965 Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 158 Ferrari 205B 1.5 V8 ROC
Ret
SYR
2
SMT INT
2
MED RAN
1966 Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 312 Ferrari 218 3.0 V12 RSA SYR
1
INT
2
OUL
1967 Honda Racing Honda RA273 Honda RA273E 3.0 V12 ROC
Ret
SPC
3
INT SYR OUL ESP
1968 Lola Racing Lola T100 BMW M12 2.0 L4 ROC
DNS
INT OUL
1969 Owen Racing Organisation BRM P138 BRM P142 3.0 V12 ROC
DNS
INT MAD OUL
1970 Team Surtees McLaren M7C Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 ROC
Ret
INT
Surtees TS7 OUL
1
1971 Brooke Bond Oxo Team Surtees Surtees TS9 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 ARG ROC
3
QUE SPR
Ret
INT
11
RIN
3
OUL
1
VIC
6
1972 Team Surtees Surtees TS9 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 ROC BRA INT
3
OUL REP VIC
Source: [46]

Complete 24 Hours of Le Mans results

YearTeamCo-DriversCarClassLapsPos.Class
Pos.
1963 Flag of Italy.svg Automobili Ferrari S.E.F.A.C. Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Willy Mairesse Ferrari 250P P 3.0252DNFDNF
1964 Flag of Italy.svg SpA Ferrari SEFAC Flag of Italy.svg Lorenzo Bandini Ferrari 330P P 5.03373rd3rd
1965 Flag of Italy.svg SpA Ferrari SEFAC Flag of Italy.svg Ludovico Scarfiotti Ferrari 330 P2 P 5.0225DNFDNF
1967 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Lola Cars Flag of the United Kingdom.svg David Hobbs Lola T70-Aston Martin P +5.03DNFDNF
Source: [47]

Complete European Formula Two Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearEntrantChassisEngine1234567891011121314Pos.Pts
1967 Lola Racing Lola T100 Ford SNE
Ret
SIL
3
BRH
DNQ
VAL NC0
BMW NÜR
2
HOC TUL JAR ZAN PER
1972 Team Surtees Surtees TS10 Ford MAL THR
Ret
HOC PAU PAL
DNQ
HOC ROU
DNQ
ÖST IMO
1
MAN PER SAL ALB HOC NC0
Source: [46]

Graded drivers not eligible for European Formula Two Championship points

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Cooper Car Company auto racing team

The Cooper Car Company is a car manufacturer founded in December 1947 by Charles Cooper and his son John Cooper. Together with John's boyhood friend, Eric Brandon, they began by building racing cars in Charles's small garage in Surbiton, Surrey, England, in 1946. Through the 1950s and early 1960s they reached motor racing's highest levels as their rear-engined, single-seat cars altered the face of Formula One and the Indianapolis 500, and their Mini Cooper dominated rally racing. Due in part to Cooper's legacy, Great Britain remains the home of a thriving racing industry, and the Cooper name lives on in the Cooper versions of the Mini production cars that are still built in England, but are now owned and marketed by BMW.

The Surtees Racing Organisation was a race team that spent nine seasons as a constructor in Formula One, Formula 2, and Formula 5000.

1961 German Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1961

The 1961 German Grand Prix was the 23rd time the German Grand Prix motor race was held. The race also held the honorary designation of the 21st European Grand Prix. It was run to Formula One regulations as race 6 of 8 in both the 1961 World Championship of Drivers and the 1961 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers It was held on 6 August 1961 over 15 laps of the giant 14.2 mile Nürburgring Nordschleife circuit for a race distance of almost 213 miles. The race also celebrated the 100th race since the establishment of the World Championship in 1950.

1966 French Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1966

The 1966 French Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Reims on 3 July 1966. It was race 3 of 9 in both the 1966 World Championship of Drivers and the 1966 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The race was the "60th Anniversary race" of Grand Prix racing, which had started with the GP of France in 1906. It was also the 16th and last time the French Grand Prix was held on variations of French highways near Reims, following a three-year absence from the region. The race was held over 48 laps of the 8.35-kilometre (5.19 mi) circuit for a race distance of 400 kilometres (250 mi).

1966 Italian Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1966

The 1966 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Monza on September 4, 1966. It was race 7 of 9 in both the 1966 World Championship of Drivers and the 1966 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The race was the 36th Italian Grand Prix and the 32nd to be held at Monza. The race was held over 68 laps of the five kilometre circuit for a race distance of 391 kilometres.

1966 Mexican Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1966

The 1966 Mexican Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at the Ciudad Deportiva Magdalena Mixhuca on October 23, 1966. It was race 9 of 9 in both the 1966 World Championship of Drivers and the 1966 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The race was the fifth Mexican Grand Prix. The race was held over 65 laps of the 5 km (3.1 mi) circuit for a race distance of 325 km (202 mi). It was the first run under the new three-litre formula.

1968 Belgian Grand Prix Formula One motor race

The 1968 Belgian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at the Spa-Francorchamps Circuit on 9 June 1968. It was race 4 of 12 in both the 1968 World Championship of Drivers and the 1968 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The 28-lap race was won by McLaren driver Bruce McLaren after he started from sixth position. Pedro Rodríguez finished second for the BRM team and Ferrari driver Jacky Ickx came in third.

1968 Canadian Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1968

The 1968 Canadian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at the Circuit Mont-Tremblant in St. Jovite, Quebec, Canada on September 22, 1968. It was race 10 of 12 in both the 1968 World Championship of Drivers and the 1968 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The 90-lap race was won by McLaren driver Denny Hulme after starting from sixth position. Hulme's teammate Bruce McLaren finished second and BRM driver Pedro Rodríguez came in third.

The 1968 Formula One season was the 22nd season of the FIA's Formula One motor racing. It featured the 19th FIA World Championship, which commenced on 1 January 1968, and ended on 3 November after twelve races, and numerous non-championship races.

The 1966 Formula One season was the 20th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1966 World Championship of Drivers and the 1966 International Cup for F1 Manufacturers which were contested concurrently over a nine-race series that commenced on 22 May and ended on 23 October. The season also included a number of non-championship races for Formula One cars.

The 1964 Formula One season was the 18th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It included the 1964 World Championship of Drivers, won by John Surtees; and the 1964 International Cup for F1 Manufacturers, won by Ferrari – both of which were contested concurrently over a series which commenced on 10 May and ended on 25 October after ten races. The season also included eight non-championship races for Formula One cars.

Carlos Pace racecar driver

José Carlos Pace was a racing driver from Brazil. He participated in 73 Formula One World Championship Grands Prix, debuting on March 4, 1972. He won one race, achieved six podiums, and scored a total of 58 championship points. He also secured one pole position.

Ludovico Scarfiotti racecar driver

Ludovico Scarfiotti was a Formula One and sports car driver from Italy. Just prior to entering Formula One, he won the 1963 24 Hours of Le Mans for Ferrari. He later participated in 12 World Championship Formula One grands prix, and many non-championship races. He won one World Championship race, and scored a total of 17 championship points. A motor sports competitor for a decade, Scarfiotti won the 1962 and 1965 European Hillclimb Championship. He was proclaimed Italy's best driver in both 1962 and 1965.

Mike Parkes English racing driver

Michael Johnson Parkes was a British racing driver, from England. Parkes was born into an automotive background as his father John, was Chairman of the Alvis Group.

Giacomo Agostini Italian motorcycle racer

Giacomo Agostini is an Italian multi-time world champion Grand Prix motorcycle road racer. Nicknamed Ago, with an absolute record of 122 Grand Prix wins and 15 World Championships titles. Of these, 68 wins and 8 titles came in the 500cc class, the rest in the 350cc class.

Ferrari 312 racing automobile

The Ferrari 312 was the designation of the 3 litre V-12 Formula One cars raced by the Italian team from 1966 to 1969. Designed under the leadership of Mauro Forghieri, there were two distinct variations using this designation, the 1966 version and the completely different 1967-69 version. The '66 cars carried on the chassis numbering sequence from the previous year's 1.5 litre cars, while the '67 cars began a new sequence at "0001". To avoid confusion, the cars are commonly referred to as 312/66, 312/67 etc.

MV Agusta 500 racers Motorcycles used to compete in 500cc Grand Prix motorcycle racing series

The MV Agusta 500cc road racers were motorcycles that the manufacturer MV Agusta built and which were used to compete in 500cc Grand Prix motorcycle racing series between 1950 and 1976. 18 500cc world championship titles were achieved with these machines ridden by John Surtees, Gary Hocking, Mike Hailwood, Giacomo Agostini and Phil Read between 1958 and 1974.

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Sporting positions
Preceded by
Geoff Duke
500cc Motorcycle World Champion
1956
Succeeded by
Libero Liberati
Preceded by
Libero Liberati
500cc Motorcycle World Champion
1958–1960
Succeeded by
Gary Hocking
Preceded by
Jim Clark
Formula One World Champion
1964
Succeeded by
Jim Clark
Preceded by
Inaugural
Can-Am Champion
1966
Succeeded by
Bruce McLaren
Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Ian Black
BBC Sports Personality of the Year
1959
Succeeded by
David Broome
Preceded by
Jim Clark
Hawthorn Memorial Trophy
1964
Succeeded by
Jim Clark