John Thompson (1749–1823)

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John Thompson (March 20, 1749 – September 30, 1823) was a United States Representative from New York.

New York (state) State of the United States of America

New York is a state in the Northeastern United States, Mid-Atlantic, Great Lakes. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.54 million residents in 2018, it is the fourth most populous state. In order to distinguish the state from the city with the same name, it is often times referred to as New York State.

Contents

Biography

Thompson was born in Litchfield, Connecticut on March 20, 1749. He attended the common schools, and at the age of fourteen moved with his parents to Stillwater, New York, where he became a farmer. Thompson served in the American Revolution as a captain, and commanded a company of the 13th Regiment of Albany County Militia, including participation in the Battles of Saratoga. [1] He was appointed a justice of the peace in 1788 and was a member of the New York State Assembly in 1788 and 1789.

Litchfield, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Litchfield is a town in and former county seat of Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 8,466 at the 2010 census. The boroughs of Bantam and Litchfield are located within the town. There are also three unincorporated villages: East Litchfield, Milton, and Northfield.

Stillwater, New York Town

Stillwater is a town in Saratoga County, New York, United States, with an estimated population of 8,547 in 2016. The town contains a village called Stillwater. The town is at the eastern border of the county, southeast of Saratoga Springs and borders both Rensselaer and Washington counties. Saratoga National Historical Park is located within the town's limits. There is a hamlet in Minerva, Essex County, New York with the same name which has nothing to do with this town.

American Revolution Colonial revolt in which the Thirteen Colonies won independence from Great Britain

The American Revolution was a colonial revolt that took place between 1765 and 1783. The American Patriots in the Thirteen Colonies won independence from Great Britain, becoming the United States of America. They defeated the British in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) in alliance with France and others.

Thompson was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the Sixth Congress, serving from March 4, 1799 to March 3, 1801. He was a delegate to the New York State Constitutional Convention in 1801. In 1791 Governor George Clinton appointed him first judge of Saratoga County, and he served until 1809.

Democratic-Republican Party Historical American political party

The Democratic-Republican Party was an American political party formed by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison around 1792 to oppose the centralizing policies of the new Federalist Party run by Alexander Hamilton, who was Secretary of the Treasury and chief architect of George Washington's administration. From 1801 to 1825, the new party controlled the presidency and Congress as well as most states during the First Party System. It began in 1791 as one faction in Congress and included many politicians who had been opposed to the new constitution. They called themselves Republicans after their political philosophy, republicanism. They distrusted the Federalist tendency to centralize and loosely interpret the Constitution, believing these policies were signs of monarchism and anti-republican values. The party splintered in 1824, with the faction loyal to Andrew Jackson coalescing into the Jacksonian movement, the faction led by John Quincy Adams and Henry Clay forming the National Republican Party and some other groups going on to form the Anti-Masonic Party. The National Republicans, Anti-Masons, and other opponents of Andrew Jackson later formed themselves into the Whig Party.

George Clinton (vice president) American soldier and statesman

George Clinton was an American soldier and statesman, considered one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. A prominent Democratic-Republican, Clinton served as the fourth vice president of the United States from 1805 until his death in 1812. He also served as governor of New York from 1777 to 1795 and from 1801 to 1804. Along with John C. Calhoun, he is one of two vice presidents to hold office under two presidents.

Saratoga County, New York County in the United States

Saratoga County is a county in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2018 U.S. Census estimate, the county's population was 230,163, representing a 4.8% increase from the 2010 population of 219,607, representing one of the fastest growth rates in the northeastern United States and the fastest-growing county in Upstate New York. The county seat is Ballston Spa. Saratoga County is included in the Capital District, encompassing the Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Thompson was again elected to Congress in 1806, and he served in the Tenth and Eleventh Congresses, March 4, 1807 to March 3, 1811.

He died in Stillwater on September 30, 1823 and was interred at Yellow Meeting House Cemetery in Stillwater.

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References

  1. Seymour, Mary Jane (1898). Lineage Book - National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Vol. 7. Harrisburg, PA: Harrisburg Publishing Co. p. 7.

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress and its predecessor, the Continental Congress. Also included are Delegates from territories and the District of Columbia and Resident Commissioners from the Philippines and Puerto Rico.

Find A Grave is a website that allows the public to search and add to an online database of cemetery records. It is owned by Ancestry.com. It receives and uploads digital photographs of headstones from burial sites, taken by unpaid volunteers at cemeteries. Find A Grave then posts the photo on its website.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
John Evert Van Alen
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 7th congressional district

1799–1801
Succeeded by
David Thomas
Preceded by
Peter Sailly
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 11th congressional district

1807–1809
Succeeded by
Thomas R. Gold
Preceded by
James I. Van Alen
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 8th congressional district

1809–1811
Succeeded by
Benjamin Pond