John Thynne, 3rd Baron Carteret

Last updated


The Lord Carteret

PC
Vice-Chamberlain of the Household
In office
1804–1812
Monarch George III
Prime Minister Hon. William Pitt the Younger
The Lord Grenville
The Duke of Portland
Hon. Spencer Perceval
Preceded by Hon. Charles Francis Greville
Succeeded by The Earl of Yarmouth
Personal details
Born28 December 1772 (1772-12-28)
Died10 March 1849 (1849-03-11) (aged 76)
Hawnes Place, Bedfordshire
Nationality British
Spouse(s)Mary Anne Master
(d. 1863)
Alma mater St John's College, Cambridge

John Thynne, 3rd Baron Carteret PC (28 December 1772 – 10 March 1849), known as Lord John Thynne between 1789 and 1838, was a British peer and politician.

Contents

Background and education

Carteret was the third son of Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath, and Lady Elizabeth, daughter of William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland. He was educated at St John's College, Cambridge. [1]

Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath 18th-century English noble

Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath, KG, PC, of Longleat in Wiltshire, was a British politician who held office under King George III. He served as Southern Secretary, Northern Secretary and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Between 1751 and 1789, he was known as the 3rd Viscount Weymouth. He is possibly best known for his role in the Falklands Crisis of 1770.

William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland English peer

William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland, styled Viscount Woodstock from 1709 to 1716 and Marquess of Titchfield from 1716 to 1726, was a British peer and politician.

St Johns College, Cambridge college of the University of Cambridge

St John's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge founded by the Tudor matriarch Lady Margaret Beaufort. In constitutional terms, the college is a charitable corporation established by a charter dated 9 April 1511. The aims of the college, as specified by its statutes, are the promotion of education, religion, learning and research. It is one of the larger Oxbridge colleges in terms of student numbers. For 2018, St. John’s was ranked 9th of 29 colleges in the Tompkins Table with over 30% of its students earning First-class honours.

Political career

Carteret was returned to Parliament for Weobly in May 1796, a seat he held until December the same year, [2] and then represented Bath between 1796 and 1832. [3] He served as Vice-Chamberlain of the Household from 1804 to 1812 and was sworn into the Privy Council in 1804. [4] In 1838 he succeeded his childless elder brother in the barony and took his seat in the House of Lords.

Vice-Chamberlain of the Household position

The Vice-Chamberlain of the Household is a member of the Royal Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. The office-holder is usually a junior government whip in the British House of Commons ranking third or fourth after the Chief Whip and the Deputy Chief Whip. He or she is the Deputy to the Lord Chamberlain of the Household. The Vice-Chamberlain's main roles are to compile a daily private report to the Sovereign on proceedings in the House of Commons and to relay addresses from the Commons to the Sovereign and back. As a member of the Royal Household, the Vice-Chamberlain accompanies the Sovereign and Royal Household at certain diplomatic and social events, particularly the annual garden party at Buckingham Palace. When the Sovereign goes in procession to Westminster for the State Opening of Parliament, the Vice-Chamberlain stays and is "held captive" at Buckingham Palace. This custom began with the Restoration (1660), because of the previous Vice-Chamberlain's role in the beheading of Charles I.

House of Lords upper house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Lords, also known as the House of Peers, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Membership is granted by appointment or else by heredity or official function. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled.

Hawnes Park, {later Hayes Park) Hawnes, Haynes Church End (geograph 3340940).jpg
Hawnes Park, {later Hayes Park)

Marriage

In 1801 Lord Carteret married Mary Anne Master (d. February 1863), daughter of Thomas Master. They had no children.

Death & succession

He died at his house Hawnes Park in March 1849, aged 76. On his death the barony became extinct, while the estate passed to his nephew the Rev. Lord John Thynne, third son of Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath and sub-Dean of Westminster. [5]

Lord John Thynne

Rev. Lord John Thynne was an Anglican cleric, who served for 45 years as Deputy Dean of Westminster.

Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath British politician

Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath KG, styled Viscount Weymouth from 1789 until 1796, was a British peer.

Dean of Westminster position

The Dean of Westminster is the head of the chapter at Westminster Abbey. Due to the Abbey's status as a Royal Peculiar, the dean answers directly to the British monarch. Initially, the office was a successor to that of abbot of Westminster, and was for the first 10 years cathedral dean for the Diocese of Westminster. The current dean is John Hall.

Related Research Articles

Marquess of Bath title in the Peerage of Great Britain

Marquess of Bath is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1789 for Thomas Thynne, Viscount Weymouth. The Marquess holds the subsidiary titles Baron Thynne, of Warminster in the County of Wiltshire , and Viscount Weymouth, both created in 1682 in the Peerage of England. He is also a baronet in the Baronetage of England.

Longleat stately home in Wiltshire, England, UK

Longleat is an English stately home and the seat of the Marquesses of Bath. It is a leading and early example of the Elizabethan prodigy house. It is adjacent to the village of Horningsham and near the towns of Warminster and Westbury in Wiltshire and Frome in Somerset. It is noted for its Elizabethan country house, maze, landscaped parkland and safari park. The house is set in 1,000 acres (400 ha) of parkland landscaped by Capability Brown, with 4,000 acres (1,600 ha) of let farmland and 4,000 acres (1,600 ha) of woodland, which includes a Center Parcs holiday village. It was the first stately home to open to the public, and the Longleat estate includes the first safari park outside Africa.

Henry Thynne, 6th Marquess of Bath British politician

Henry Frederick Thynne, 6th Marquess of Bath, JP, styled Lord Henry Thynne until 1916 and Viscount Weymouth between 1916 and 1946, was a British aristocrat, landowner, and Conservative Party politician.

Thomas Thynne, 5th Marquess of Bath politician

Thomas Henry Thynne, 5th Marquess of Bath, styled Viscount Weymouth until 1896, was a British landowner and Conservative politician. He held ministerial office as Under-Secretary of State for India in 1905 and Master of the Horse between 1922 and 1924. He was also involved in local politics and served as Chairman of Wiltshire County Council between 1906 and his death in 1946.

John Thynne, 4th Marquess of Bath British diplomat

John Alexander Thynne, 4th Marquess of Bath, styled Viscount Weymouth between March and June 1837, was a British peer and a diplomat for almost sixty years.

Henry Thynne, 3rd Marquess of Bath British naval commander and politician

Henry Frederick Thynne, 3rd Marquess of Bath, styled Lord Henry Thynne until January 1837 and Viscount Weymouth between January and March 1837, was a British naval commander and politician.

Lord Henry Thynne British politician

Lord Henry Frederick Thynne PC, DL was a British Conservative politician. He served under Benjamin Disraeli as Treasurer of the Household between 1875 and 1880.

Thomas Thynne, 1st Viscount Weymouth English politician and Viscount

Thomas Thynne, 1st Viscount Weymouth was a British peer in the peerage of England.

John Thynne English Member of Parliament, died 1580

Sir John Thynne was the steward to Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset and a member of parliament. He was the builder of Longleat House and his descendants became Marquesses of Bath.

Thomas Thynne (died 1682) landowner

Thomas Thynne was an English landowner of the family that is now headed by the Marquess of Bath and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1670 to 1682. He went by the nickname "Tom of Ten Thousand" due to his great wealth. He was a friend of the Duke of Monmouth, a relationship referred to in John Dryden's satirical work Absalom and Achitophel where Thynne is described as "Issachar, his wealthy western friend".

Henry Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret British politician and Baron

Henry Frederick Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret PC (1735–1826) of Hawnes, Bedfordshire, was Member of Parliament for Staffordshire (1757–61), for Weobley in Herefordshire (1761–70) and was Master of the Household to King George III 1768–1771. He was hereditary Bailiff of Jersey 1776–1826.

Thomas Thynne, 2nd Viscount Weymouth English Viscount

Thomas Thynne, 2nd Viscount Weymouth of Longleat House in Wiltshire was an English peer, descended from Sir John Thynne (c.1515-1580) builder of Longleat.

George Thynne, 2nd Baron Carteret PC, styled Lord George Thynne between 1789 and 1826, was a British Tory politician.

James Thynne politician from England

Sir James Thynne was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons in two periods between 1640 and 1670.

Thomas Thynne (died 1639) Member of Parliament

Sir Thomas Thynne, of Longleat, Wiltshire, was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1601 and 1629.

Sir Thomas Thynne was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1660.

Charles Thynne was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1614 and 1629.

John Thynne (died 1604) English landowner and politician, died 1604

Sir John Thynne of Longleat House, Wiltshire, was an English landowner and Member of Parliament.

References

  1. "Thynne, Lord John (THN792J)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  2. leighrayment.com
  3. leighrayment.com
  4. leighrayment.com
  5. 'Parishes: Hawnes or Haynes', A History of the County of Bedford: Volume 2 (1908), pp. 338-344. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=62661, accessed 17 July 2010.
  6. Burke, Sir Bernard, (1938 ed) Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage. Shaw, London. p. 243
  7. 1 2 3 Woodfall, H. (1768). The Peerage of England; Containing a Genealogical and Historical Account of All the Peers of that Kingdom Etc. Fourth Edition, Carefully Corrected, and Continued to the Present Time, Volume 6. p. 258.
  8. 1 2 Lee, Sidney; Edwards, A. S. G. (revised) (2004). "Thynne, William (d. 1546)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/27426.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  9. Girouard, Mark, Thynne, Sir John (1515–1580), estate manager and builder of Longleat in Oxford Dictionary of Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004)
  10. Booth, Muriel. "Thynne, John (?1550–1604), of Longleat, Wilts". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  11. Lancaster, Henry; Thrush, Andrew. "Thynne, Charles (c.1568–1652), of Cheddar, Som". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  12. Pugh, R. B.; Crittall, Elizabeth, eds. (1957). "Parliamentary history: 1529–1629". A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 5. British History Online. London: Victoria County History.
  13. Ferris, John P. "Thynne, Sir James (c.1605-70), of Longbridge Deverill, Wilts". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  14. Helms, M. W.; Ferris, John P. "Thynne, Sir Thomas (c.1610–c.69), of Richmond, Surr". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  15. Marshall, Alan (2008) [2004]. "Thynne, Thomas [nicknamed Tom of Ten Thousand] (1647/8–1682)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/27423.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  16. Heath-Caldwell, J. J. "Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath, 3rd Viscount Weymouth". JJ Heath-Caldwell. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  17. Hayton, D. W. "Thynne, Hon. Henry (1675-1708)". The History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  18. Dunaway, Stewart (2013). Lord John Carteret, Earl Granville: His Life History and the Granville Grants. Lulu. p. 33. ISBN   9781300878070.
  19. "Bath, Thomas Thynne". Encyclopedia Britannica 1911. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  20. Thorne, Roland. "Carteret [formerly Thynne], Henry Frederick". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  21. "Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath (1765–1837)". National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  22. Escott, Margaret. "Thynne, Lord Henry Frederick (1797-1837), of 6 Grovesnor Square, Mdx". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  23. "John Thynne, 4th Marquess of Bath (1831-1896), Diplomat and landowner". National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
John Scott
Lord George Thynne
Member of Parliament for Weobly
1796
With: Lord George Thynne
Succeeded by
Lord George Thynne
Inigo Freeman Thomas
Preceded by
Viscount Weymouth
Sir Richard Arden
Member of Parliament for Bath
17961801
With: Sir Richard Arden
Succeeded by
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Parliament of Great Britain
Member of Parliament for Bath
18011832
With: Sir Richard Arden 1801
John Palmer 18011808
Charles Palmer 18081826, 18301832
The Earl of Brecknock 18261830
Succeeded by
Charles Palmer
John Arthur Roebuck
Political offices
Preceded by
Hon. Charles Francis Greville
Vice-Chamberlain of the Household
18041812
Succeeded by
The Earl of Yarmouth
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
George Thynn
Baron Carteret
18381849
Succeeded by
Extinct