John Thynne, 4th Marquess of Bath

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The Marquess of Bath, by Carlo Pellegrini, 1874. 4th Marquess of Bath.png
The Marquess of Bath, by Carlo Pellegrini, 1874.

John Alexander Thynne, 4th Marquess of Bath (1 March 1831 – 20 April 1896), styled Viscount Weymouth between March and June 1837, was a British peer and a diplomat for almost sixty years.

Contents

Background and education

Born in St James's, he was the son of Henry Thynne, 3rd Marquess of Bath and his wife Harriet, second daughter of Alexander Baring, 1st Baron Ashburton. [1] He succeeded his father as Marquess in June 1837, aged only six. [1] Lord Bath was educated at Eton College and Christ Church, Oxford. He was a devout Anglo-Catholic and a determined opponent of the Public Worship Regulation Act 1874 which sought to suppress Ritualism in the Church of England.

St Jamess district in the City of Westminster, London, England

St James's is a central district in the City of Westminster, London, forming part of the West End. In the 17th century the area developed as a residential location for the British aristocracy, and around the 19th century was the focus of the development of gentlemen's clubs. Anciently part of the parish of St Martin in the Fields, much of it formed the parish of St James from 1685 to 1922. Since the Second World War the area has transitioned from residential to commercial use.

Henry Thynne, 3rd Marquess of Bath British naval commander and politician

Henry Frederick Thynne, 3rd Marquess of Bath, styled Lord Henry Thynne until January 1837 and Viscount Weymouth between January and March 1837, was a British naval commander and politician.

Alexander Baring, 1st Baron Ashburton British politician

Alexander Baring, 1st Baron Ashburton PC was a British politician and financier, and a member of the Baring family. Baring was the second son of Sir Francis Baring, 1st Baronet, and of Harriet, daughter of William Herring. His grandfather, John Baring (1697–1748), emigrated from Germany and established the family in England.

Career

He held the office of Envoy Extraordinary for the coronation of King Pedro V of Portugal on 27 May 1858, and Envoy Extraordinary for the coronation of the Emperor Franz Joseph I as King of Hungary on 25 July 1867.

Diplomatic rank is a system of professional and social rank used in the world of diplomacy and international relations. A diplomat's rank determines many ceremonial details, such as the order of precedence at official processions, table seatings at state dinners, the person to whom diplomatic credentials should be presented, and the title by which the diplomat should be addressed.

Pedro V of Portugal King of Portugal

Peter V, nicknamed "the Hopeful", was King of Portugal from 1853 to 1861.

Franz Joseph I of Austria Emperor of Austria and King of Hungary

Franz Joseph I or Francis Joseph I was Emperor of Austria, King of Hungary, and monarch of many other states of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, from 2 December 1848 to his death. From 1 May 1850 to 24 August 1866 he was also President of the German Confederation. He was the longest-reigning Emperor of Austria and King of Hungary, as well as the third-longest-reigning monarch of any country in European history, after Louis XIV of France and Johann II of Liechtenstein.

From 1874 to 1893, he was a trustee of the National Portrait Gallery, as well as a trustee of the British Museum in 1883. He was Chairman of Wiltshire County Council and, having been a Deputy Lieutenant of Somerset from 1853, was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Wiltshire in 1889, a post he held until his death in 1896.

British Museum National museum in the Bloomsbury area of London

The British Museum, in the Bloomsbury area of London, United Kingdom, is a public institution dedicated to human history, art and culture. Its permanent collection of some eight million works is among the largest and most comprehensive in existence, having been widely sourced during the era of the British Empire. It documents the story of human culture from its beginnings to the present. It was the first public national museum in the world.

Somerset County of England

Somerset is a county in South West England which borders Gloucestershire and Bristol to the north, Wiltshire to the east, Dorset to the south-east and Devon to the south-west. It is bounded to the north and west by the Severn Estuary and the Bristol Channel, its coastline facing southeastern Wales. Its traditional border with Gloucestershire is the River Avon. Somerset's county town is Taunton.

This is a list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant of Wiltshire. From 1750, all Lord Lieutenants have also been Custos Rotulorum of Wiltshire.

Family and death

He married Frances Isabella Catherine Vesey, daughter of Thomas Vesey, 3rd Viscount de Vesci, on 20 August 1861. They had six children:

Thomas Vesey, 3rd Viscount de Vesci British politician

Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Vesey, 3rd Viscount de Vesci, was an Irish peer and Conservative politician.

Thomas Thynne, 5th Marquess of Bath politician

Thomas Henry Thynne, 5th Marquess of Bath, styled Viscount Weymouth until 1896, was a British landowner and Conservative politician. He held ministerial office as Under-Secretary of State for India in 1905 and Master of the Horse between 1922 and 1924. He was also involved in local politics and served as Chairman of Wiltshire County Council between 1906 and his death in 1946.

Evelyn Baring, 1st Earl of Cromer British diplomat

Evelyn Baring, 1st Earl of Cromer, was a British statesman, diplomat and colonial administrator. He was British controller-general in Egypt during 1879, part of the international Control which oversaw Egyptian finances after the 1876 Egyptian bankruptcy. He later became the agent and consul-general in Egypt from 1883 to 1907 during the British occupation prompted by the 'Urabi revolt. This position gave Baring de facto control over Egyptian finances and governance.

Lord Alexander Thynne British politician

Lord Alexander George Boteville Thynne, DSO was a British Army officer and Conservative politician.

Lord Bath died in 1896, aged 65, in Italy and was buried at Longbridge Deverill, Wiltshire. His arms were those of Botfield quartering Thynne augmented and were blazoned Quarterly 1 & 4. Barry of ten or and sable (Botfield) 2 & 3. A lion rampant tail nowed (Thynne, augmentation of honour). [3]

Longbridge Deverill village in United Kingdom

Longbridge Deverill is a village and civil parish about 2.5 miles (4.0 km) south of Warminster in Wiltshire, England. It is on the A350 primary route which connects the M4 motorway and west Wiltshire with Poole, Dorset.

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References

  1. 1 2 Dod, Robert P. (1860). The Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage of Great Britain and Ireland. London: Whitaker and Co. p. 107.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Record at Commonwealth War Graves Commission website
  3. British Armourial Bindings: Barry of Ten, University of Toronto Libraries, accessed 16 Dec 2017.
  4. Burke, Sir Bernard, (1938 ed) Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage. Shaw, London. p. 243
  5. 1 2 3 Woodfall, H. (1768). The Peerage of England; Containing a Genealogical and Historical Account of All the Peers of that Kingdom Etc. Fourth Edition, Carefully Corrected, and Continued to the Present Time, Volume 6. p. 258.
  6. 1 2 Wikisource-logo.svg  Lee, Sidney, ed. (1898). "Thynne, William"  . Dictionary of National Biography . 56. London: Smith, Elder & Co.
  7. Girouard, Mark, Thynne, Sir John (1515–1580), estate manager and builder of Longleat in Oxford Dictionary of Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004)
  8. Booth, Muriel. "THYNNE, John (?1550-1604), of Longleat, Wilts". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  9. Lancaster, Henry; Thrush, Andrew. "THYNNE, Charles (c.1568-1652), of Cheddar, Som". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  10. Rugh, R. B.; Critall, Elizabeth. "'Parliamentary history : 1529-1629', in A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 5". British History Online. Victoria County History. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  11. Ferris, John P. "THYNNE, Sir James (c.1605-70), of Longbridge Deverill, Wilts". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  12. Helms, M. W.; Ferris, John P. "THYNNE, Sir Thomas (c.1610-c.69), of Richmond, Surr". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  13. Marshall, Alan. "Thynne, Thomas". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 2 January 2016. (Subscription required (help)).
  14. Heath-Caldwell, J. J. "Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath, 3rd Viscount Weymouth". JJ Heath-Caldwell. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  15. Hayton, D. W. "THYNNE, Hon. Henry (1675-1708)". The History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  16. Dunaway, Stewart (2013). Lord John Carteret, Earl Granville - His Life History and the Granville Grants. Lulu. p. 33. ISBN   9781300878070.
  17. "Bath, Thomas Thynne". Encyclopedia Britannica 1911. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  18. Thorne, Roland. "Carteret [formerly Thynne], Henry Frederick". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  19. "Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath (1765-1837)". National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  20. Escott, Margaret. "THYNNE, Lord Henry Frederick (1797-1837), of 6 Grovesnor Square, Mdx". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  21. "John Thynne, 4th Marquess of Bath (1831-1896), Diplomat and landowner". National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Earl of Radnor
Lord Lieutenant of Wiltshire
1889–1896
Succeeded by
The Marquess of Lansdowne
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
Henry Thynne
Marquess of Bath
1837–1896
Succeeded by
Thomas Thynne