John W. Howe (politician)

Last updated

John W. Howe
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Pennsylvania's 22nd district
In office
March 4, 1849 March 3, 1853
Preceded by John Wilson Farrelly
Succeeded by Thomas Marshall Howe
Personal details
Born(1801-03-11)March 11, 1801
District of Maine, Massachusetts
DiedNovember 30, 1873(1873-11-30) (aged 72)
Rochester, New York
Political party Free Soil
Whig

John W. Howe (March 11, 1801 November 30, 1873) was a Free Soil and Whig member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania.

Biography

Howe was born in Massachusetts' District of Maine in 1801. He studied law and was admitted to the bar. He moved to Smethport, Pennsylvania, and then to Franklin, Pennsylvania, in 1829 and commenced the practice of law. He also served as justice of the peace.

Howe was elected as a Free Soil candidate to the Thirty-first Congress and reelected as a Whig to the Thirty-second Congress. He moved to Meadville, Pennsylvania, and later to Rochester, New York, where he died in 1873. Interment in Greendale Cemetery in Meadville, Pennsylvania.

Sources

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
John W. Farrelly
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's 22nd congressional district

1849 - 1853
Succeeded by
Thomas M. Howe


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