John W. Kittera

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John W Kittera JohnWKittera.jpg
John W Kittera

John Wilkes Kittera (November 1752 – June 6, 1801) was an American lawyer and politician from Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

Kittera was born near Blue Ball, Pennsylvania. He was appointed by President John Adams as United States attorney for the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. He represented Pennsylvania in the United States House of Representatives from 1791 until 1801.

He is the father of Thomas Kittera.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
District created
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's 8th congressional district

March 4, 1791 – March 3, 1793
Succeeded by
District eliminated
Preceded by
District created
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's at-large congressional district

March 4, 1793 – March 3, 1795
Served alongside: Fitzsimons, Muhlenberg, Findley, Hartley, Scott, Armstrong, Muhlenberg, Gregg, Hiester, Irvine, Smilie & Montgomery
Succeeded by
District eliminated
Preceded by
District created
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's 7th congressional district

March 4, 1795 – March 3, 1801
Succeeded by


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