John W. Taylor (politician)

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John W. Taylor
SpeakerTaylor.png
9th Speaker of the United States House of Representatives
In office
December 5, 1825 March 4, 1827
Preceded by Henry Clay
Succeeded by Andrew Stevenson
In office
November 15, 1820 March 4, 1821
Preceded byHenry Clay
Succeeded by Philip P. Barbour
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 11th district
In office
March 4, 1813 March 3, 1823
Preceded by Thomas R. Gold
Succeeded by Charles A. Foote
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 17th district
In office
March 4, 1823 March 3, 1833
Preceded by Thomas H. Hubbard
Succeeded by Joel Turrill
Member of the New York Senate
from the 5th district
In office
January 1, 1841 December 31, 1842
Preceded by Samuel Young
Succeeded by Sidney Lawrence
Personal details
BornMarch 26, 1784
Charlton, New York
DiedSeptember 18, 1854 (aged 70)
Cleveland, Ohio
Political party Democratic-Republican (before 1825)
National Republican (after 1825)
Spouse(s)Jane Hodge Taylor
Alma mater Union College
Profession Law

John W. Taylor (March 26, 1784 – September 18, 1854) was an early 19th-century U.S. politician from New York. He was the first Speaker of the House of Representatives from the state.

New York (state) State of the United States of America

New York is a state in the Northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.54 million residents in 2018, it is the fourth most populous state. In order to distinguish the state from the city with the same name, it is sometimes referred to as New York State.

Speaker of the United States House of Representatives Leader in the lower house of the U.S. Congress

The speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the United States House of Representatives. The office was established in 1789 by Article I, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution. The speaker is the political and parliamentary leader of the House of Representatives, and is simultaneously the House's presiding officer, de facto leader of the body's majority party, and the institution's administrative head. Speakers also perform various other administrative and procedural functions. Given these several roles and responsibilities, the speaker usually does not personally preside over debates. That duty is instead delegated to members of the House from the majority party. Neither does the speaker regularly participate in floor debates.

Contents

Life

Taylor was born in 1784 in that part of the Town of Ballston, then in Albany County, New York, which was, upon the creation of Saratoga County in 1791, split off to form the Town of Charlton. He received his first education at home.

Ballston, New York Town in New York, United States

Ballston is a town in Saratoga County, New York, United States. The population was 8,729 at the 2000 census. The name is derived from an early settler, Eliphalet Ball, a Presbyterian minister who located there from Westchester County, New York in 1770.

Albany County, New York County in the United States

Albany County is a county in the state of New York, in the United States. Its northern border is formed by the Mohawk River, at its confluence with the Hudson River, which is on the east. As of the 2010 census, the population was 304,204. The county seat is Albany, the state capital of New York. As originally established by the English government in the colonial era, Albany County had an indefinite amount of land, but has had an area of 530 square miles (1,400 km2) since March 3, 1888. The county is named for the Duke of York and of Albany, who became James II of England.

Saratoga County, New York County in the United States

Saratoga County is a county in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2018 U.S. Census estimate, the county's population was 230,163, representing a 4.8% increase from the 2010 population of 219,607, representing one of the fastest growth rates in the northeastern United States and the fastest-growing county in Upstate New York. The county seat is Ballston Spa. Saratoga County is included in the Capital District, encompassing the Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Taylor graduated from Union College in 1803 as valedictorian of his class. Then he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1807, and practiced in Ballston Spa, New York. In 1806, he married Jane Hodge (died 1838), of Albany, New York, and they had eight children. He was a member from Saratoga County of the New York State Assembly in 1812 and 1812–13.

Union College

Union College is a private, non-denominational liberal arts college located in Schenectady, New York. Founded in 1795, it was the first institution of higher learning chartered by the New York State Board of Regents. In the 19th century, it became the "Mother of Fraternities", as three of the earliest such organizations were established there. After 175 years as a traditional all-male institution, Union College began enrolling women in 1970.

Valedictorian is an academic title of success used in the United States, Canada, Philippines, and Armenia for the student who delivers the closing or farewell statement at a graduation ceremony. The chosen valedictorian is traditionally the student with the highest ranking among their graduating class. The term is an Anglicised derivation of the Latin vale dicere, historically rooted in the valedictorian's traditional role as the final speaker at the graduation ceremony before the students receive their diplomas. The valedictory address generally is considered a final farewell to classmates, before they disperse to pursue their individual paths after graduating.

Ballston Spa, New York Village in New York, United States

Ballston Spa is a village and the county seat of Saratoga County, New York, United States, located southwest of Saratoga Springs. The population of the village, named after Rev. Eliphalet Ball, a Congregationalist clergyman and an early settler, was 5,556 at the 2000 census. Ballston Spa lies on the border of two towns, situated partly in the Town of Ballston and partly in the Town of Milton.

Taylor served in the United States House of Representatives for 20 years, from 1813 to 1833, and was twice elected as Speaker of the House: in 1820 and in 1825. In 1819, he supported the proposed Tallmadge Amendment regarding the Missouri Territory's admission to the Union as a free state (which passed the House, but was defeated in the Senate), and was a staunch proponent of the subsequent Missouri Compromise of March 1820. During the floor debate on the Tallmadge Amendment, Taylor boldly criticized southern lawmakers who frequently voiced their dismay that slavery was entrenched and necessary to their existence. [1]

United States House of Representatives lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower house of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper house. Together they compose the national legislature of the United States.

Tallmadge Amendment

The Tallmadge Amendment was a proposed amendment to a bill regarding the admission of the Territory of Missouri to the Union, which requested that Missouri be admitted as a free state. The amendment was submitted in the U.S. House of Representatives on February 13, 1819, by James Tallmadge, Jr., a Democratic-Republican from New York, and Charles Baumgardner. In 1820, the Missouri Compromise was passed, which did not include the Tallmadge Amendment, but rather attempted to appease both sides of the debate by admitting Missouri as a slave state in exchange for the admission of Maine as a free state and the complete prohibition of slavery in all of the remaining Louisiana Purchase territory north of the 36˚30' parallel, except in Missouri.

Missouri Territory territory of the USA between 1812-1820

The Territory of Missouri was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from June 4, 1812 until August 10, 1821. In 1819, the Territory of Arkansas was created from a portion of its southern area. In 1821, a southeastern portion of the territory was admitted to the Union as the State of Missouri, and the rest became unorganized territory for several years.

After leaving Congress, Taylor resumed his law practice in Ballston Spa, and was a member of the New York State Senate (4th D.) in 1841 and 1842. He resigned his seat on August 19, 1842, after suffering a paralytic stroke. In 1843, he moved to Cleveland, Ohio, to live with his eldest daughter and her husband William D. Beattie, and died there 11 years later. [2] He was buried in the Ballston Spa Village Cemetery.

New York State Senate upper state chamber of New York State

The New York State Senate is the upper house of the New York State Legislature. Its members are elected to two-year terms; there are no term limits. As of 2014, there are 63 seats in the Senate.

64th New York State Legislature

The 64th New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 5 to May 25, 1841, during the third year of William H. Seward's governorship, in Albany.

65th New York State Legislature

The 65th New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 4 to September 7, 1842, during the fourth year of William H. Seward's governorship, in Albany.

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References

  1. Gooley, Lawrence P. (January 23, 2019). "John W. Taylor: New York's (Almost Only) Speaker of the House". Adirondack Almanack. Saranac Lake, New York: Adirondack Explorer. Retrieved August 2, 2019.
  2. Genealogy of Judge John Taylor and His Descendants , pages 25ff

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress and its predecessor, the Continental Congress. Also included are Delegates from territories and the District of Columbia and Resident Commissioners from the Philippines and Puerto Rico.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Thomas R. Gold
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 11th congressional district

1813–1823
Succeeded by
Charles A. Foote
Preceded by
Henry Clay
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
1820–1821
Succeeded by
Philip Pendleton Barbour
Preceded by
Thomas H. Hubbard
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 17th congressional district

1823–1833
Succeeded by
Samuel Beardsley,
Joel Turrill
Preceded by
Henry Clay
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
1825–1827
Succeeded by
Andrew Stevenson
New York State Senate
Preceded by
Samuel Young
New York State Senate
Fourth District (Class 2)

1841–1842
Succeeded by
Sidney Lawrence