John of Foix, Viscount of Narbonne

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John of Foix
Count of Étampes
Viscount of Narbonne
Born1450
Died1500 (aged 4950)
Étampes, France
Spouse Marie of Orléans
Issue Germaine, Queen of Aragon
Gaston of Foix, Duke of Nemours
House Foix
Father Gaston IV, Count of Foix
Mother Eleanor, Queen of Navarre

John of Foix (1450 1500, Étampes, France) was a younger son of Count Gaston IV of Foix and Queen Eleanor of Navarre. His elder brother was Gaston, Prince of Viana. [1]

Contents

Life

He received the Viscounty of Narbonne from his father. He was on good terms with both Louis XI of France and Louis XII of France. He married Marie of Orléans, sister of Louis XII, in 1476. They had two children:

Following the death of his nephew, King Francis of Navarre in 1483, John claimed Navarre as the next male in the succession, challenging Francis' sister and heiress, Queen Catherine. [2] Although the Salic law had never been enforced in the Kingdom of Navarre, the result of this claim was a civil war in Navarre, which only ended in Catherine's favour in 1497, with John being forced to give up his claim. He died three years later.

Ancestry

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References

  1. Gaston IV, Comte de Foix
  2. Stuart Carroll (2006). Blood and Violence in Early Modern France . Oxford University Press. p.  43.