Joinville Studios

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Joinville Studios
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Headquarters,
1925 plan of the studio layout Studios-Pathe-Joinville-1925.jpg
1925 plan of the studio layout
Former studio buildings Studios Joinville - Joinville-le-Pont (FR94) - 2020-08-27 - 2.jpg
Former studio buildings

The Joinville Studios were a film studio in Paris which operated between 1910 and 1987. They were one of the leading French studios, with major companies such as Pathé and Gaumont making films there.

A second studio was added to the original in 1923. [1] This was located less than a kilometre away, and together the two served as a major filmmaking hub. [2] After the Second World War the studio was merged into the Franstudio network in 1947 along with other major Paris studios including the Saint-Maurice Studios and Francoeur Studios.[ citation needed ]

In the early 1930s, the American company Paramount Pictures took over the studios and made French-language versions of their hit films. In total, films were made in fourteen different languages as Joinville became a hub of such multi-language versions. [3] While many were remakes of English-language hits, some were original stories. This practice declined as dubbing became more commonplace. [4]

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References

  1. Crisp p.95
  2. Crisp p.119
  3. Bentley p.52
  4. Williams p.175-77

Bibliography