Jon Locke

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Jon Locke (October 10, 1927 – October 19, 2013) was an American actor, who often specialized in television and film westerns. [1] His television credits included westerns, including Bonanza , Gunsmoke , and The Virginian , as well as non-western series such as The Bionic Woman , The Dukes of Hazzard , The Mary Tyler Moore Show , and Perry Mason . [1] Locke had recurring roles as Officer Garvey on the 1950s crime drama series, Highway Patrol , and as a Sleestak leader in the NBC television series, Land of the Lost , during the 1970s. [1] In a 1976 episode ("Abominable Snowman") of Land of the Lost he played the Snowman.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the most populous city is New York City. Most of the country is located contiguously in North America between Canada and Mexico.

Actor person who acts in a dramatic or comic production and works in film, television, theatre, or radio

An actor is a person who portrays a character in a performance. The actor performs "in the flesh" in the traditional medium of the theatre or in modern media such as film, radio, and television. The analogous Greek term is ὑποκριτής (hupokritḗs), literally "one who answers". The actor's interpretation of their role—the art of acting—pertains to the role played, whether based on a real person or fictional character. Interpretation occurs even when the actor is "playing themselves", as in some forms of experimental performance art.

Western (genre) Multimedia genre of stories set primarily in the American Old West

Western is a genre of various arts incorporating Western lifestyle which tell stories set primarily in the latter half of the 19th century in the American Old West, often centering on the life of a nomadic cowboy or gunfighter armed with a revolver and a rifle who rides a horse. Cowboys and gunslingers typically wear Stetson hats, neckerchief bandannas, vests, spurs, cowboy boots and buckskins. Recurring characters include the aforementioned cowboys, Native Americans, bandits, lawmen, bounty hunters, outlaws, gamblers, soldiers, and settlers. The ambience is usually punctuated with a Western music score, including American and Mexican folk music such as country, Native American music, New Mexico music, and rancheras.

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Locke was born Joseph Lockey Yon on October 10, 1927, in Orlando, Florida. [1] He became involved in theater while earning his bachelor's degree at Florida State University. [1] Locke enlisted in the United States Air Force, where he began performing in a play about Korean War pilots called "Flame-Out." [1]

Orlando, Florida City in Central Florida

Orlando is a city in the U.S. state of Florida and the county seat of Orange County. Located in Central Florida, it is the center of the Orlando metropolitan area, which had a population of 2,509,831, according to U.S. Census Bureau figures released in July 2017. These figures make it the 23rd-largest metropolitan area in the United States, the sixth-largest metropolitan area in the Southern United States, and the third-largest metropolitan area in Florida. As of 2015, Orlando had an estimated city-proper population of 280,257, making it the 73rd-largest city in the United States, the fourth-largest city in Florida, and the state's largest inland city.

A bachelor's degree or baccalaureate is an undergraduate academic degree awarded by colleges and universities upon completion of a course of study lasting three to seven years. In some institutions and educational systems, some bachelor's degrees can only be taken as graduate or postgraduate degrees after a first degree has been completed. In countries with qualifications frameworks, bachelor's degrees are normally one of the major levels in the framework, although some qualifications titled bachelor's degrees may be at other levels and some qualifications with non-bachelor's titles may be classified as bachelor's degrees.

Florida State University university in the United States

Florida State University is a public space-grant and sea-grant research university in Tallahassee, Florida. It is a senior member of the State University System of Florida. Founded in 1851, it is located on the oldest continuous site of higher education in the state of Florida.

Outside of television, Locke played the banjo for an annual western film festival held in Lone Pine, California. [1] He belonged to the Reel Cowboy, which are a social group of western actors who meet in the San Fernando Valley. [1] In addition to acting, Locke worked as an office manager for a real estate firm in San Fernando. [1]

Banjo musical instrument

The banjo is a four-, five-, or six-stringed instrument with a thin membrane stretched over a frame or cavity as a resonator, called the head, which is typically circular. The membrane is typically made of plastic, although animal skin is still occasionally used. Early forms of the instrument were fashioned by Africans in the United States, adapted from African instruments of similar design. The banjo is frequently associated with folk, Irish traditional, and country music. Banjo can also be used in some rock songs. Many rock bands, such as The Eagles, Led Zeppelin, and The Allman Brothers, have used the five-string banjo in some of their songs. Historically, the banjo occupied a central place in African-American traditional music and the folk culture of rural whites before entering the mainstream via the minstrel shows of the 19th century. Along with the fiddle, the banjo is a mainstay of American old-time music. It is also very frequently used in traditional ("trad") jazz.

Lone Pine, California Census designated place in California, United States

Lone Pine is a census designated place (CDP) in Inyo County, California, United States. Lone Pine is located 16 miles (26 km) south-southeast of Independence, at an elevation of 3,727 feet. The population was 2,035 at the 2010 census, up from 1,655 at the 2000 census. The town is located in the Owens Valley, near the Alabama Hills. From possible choices of urban, rural, and frontier, the Census Bureau identifies this area as "frontier". The local hospital, Southern Inyo Hospital, offers standby emergency services. The town is named after a solitary pine tree that once existed at the mouth of Lone Pine Canyon. On March 26, 1872, the very large Lone Pine earthquake destroyed most of the town and killed 27 of its 250 to 300 residents.

San Fernando Valley large populated valley in Los Angeles County, California, USA

The San Fernando Valley is an urbanized valley in Los Angeles County, California in the Los Angeles metropolitan area, defined by the mountains of the Transverse Ranges circling it. Home to 1.77 million people, it is north of the larger, more populous Los Angeles Basin.

Jon Locke, a longtime resident of Van Nuys, California, died from complications of a stroke at Holy Cross Medical Center in Mission Hills, California, on October 19, 2013, at the age of 86. [1]

Mission Hills, California CDP in California, United States

Mission Hills is a census-designated place (CDP) in Santa Barbara County, California, a short distance north of Lompoc on Highway 1. The population was 3,576 at the 2010 census, up from 3,142 at the 2000 census.

Filmography

YearTitleRoleNotes
1955 The Scarlet Coat LieutenantUncredited
1956 The Lieutenant Wore Skirts Roger Wilkins
1956Battle StationsWallakowskiUncredited
1956 Magnificent Roughnecks Driver
1956 Westward Ho the Wagons! Ed Benjamin
1957 Under Fire Corp. John Crocker
1960 Five Guns to Tombstone Rusty Kolloway
1961 Gun Fight Saunders
1973 Cinderella Liberty Go-Go Club Owner
1981Years of the BeastPete
1988The Big TurnaroundPolice Chief
1989 Transylvania Twist Mr. Sweeney
2010Mad Mad Wagon Party(final film role)

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 "Passings: Noel Harrison, Jon Locke, Jamalul Kiram III". Los Angeles Times . 2013-10-22. Retrieved 2013-11-13.