Jonathan Marsh

Last updated
Jonathan Marsh
Bornca. 1621
Died1672
Residence New Haven Colony (1643) [1]
Milford, Connecticut Colony (1649–1657)
Norwalk, Connecticut Colony (1657–1664) [2]
Occupationmiller [2] [3]
Spouse(s)Mary (m. ca. 1640, Milford)
ChildrenSarah, Deborah, Mary, Dorothy, John, Jonathan [4]

Jonathan Marsh (1621–1672) was a founding settler of the New Haven Colony, and of Norwalk, Connecticut. [5] He came to Norwalk from New Haven sometime prior to March 1656. He was the settlement's miller.

Settler person who has migrated to an area and established permanent residence there

A settler is a person who has migrated to an area and established a permanent residence there, often to colonize the area. Settlers are generally from a sedentary culture, as opposed to nomads who share and rotate their settlements with little or no concept of individual land ownership. Settlements are often built on land already claimed or owned by another group. Many times settlers are backed by governments or large countries. They also sometimes leave in search of religious freedom.

New Haven Colony English possession in North America between 1639 and 1665

The New Haven Colony was a small English colony in North America from 1637 to 1664 in what is now the state of Connecticut.

Norwalk, Connecticut City in Connecticut, United States

Norwalk is a U.S. city located in southwestern Connecticut, in southern Fairfield County, on the northern shore of Long Island Sound. Norwalk lies within both the New York metropolitan area as well as the Bridgeport metropolitan area.

He was born about 1621, in Braintree, Essex, England, the son of John Marsh and Grace Baldwin. Jonathan and his brother Samuel came to America from England, and are recorded in Boston in 1641.

Braintree, Essex town in Essex, England

Braintree is a town in Essex, England. The principal settlement of Braintree District, it is located 10 miles (16 km) northeast of Chelmsford and 15 miles (24 km) west of Colchester. According to the 2011 Census, the town had a population of 41,634, while the urban area, which includes Great Notley, Rayne and High Garrett, had a population of 53,477.

Essex County of England

Essex is a county in the south-east of England, north-east of London. One of the home counties, it borders Suffolk and Cambridgeshire to the north, Hertfordshire to the west, Kent across the estuary of the River Thames to the south, and London to the south-west. The county town is Chelmsford, the only city in the county. For government statistical purposes Essex is placed in the East of England region.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

On May 7, 1650, he is recorded as having sold his land in New Haven to Lancelot Fuller who was married to Jonathan's sister Hannah Marsh. [6]

To this day his last surviving relative is still living in Heybridge Essex, Also called Jonathan Marsh he is a well known face and was featured in battling the Bailiffs with Chrisy Morris and can be found walking the streets of maldon helping the needy.

At a town meeting in Norwalk on January 6, 1654, a vote was taken which determined that the settlement's milling apparatus was insufficient, and already commenced improvements would be inadequate. The three settlers who were responsible for the mill at the time, Thomas Fitch, Nathaniel Richards, and Richard Olmsted, were to consult with Lieutenant Samuel Swayn, who built the mill in Stamford. [3] They constructed a dam at the mouth of Mill Brook, and Jonathan Marsh built, "a corn mill sufficient for all purposes." Marsh ran the mill for about six years, and then sold the operation to Richards. [7]

Thomas Fitch, Jr. was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Assembly of the Connecticut Colony representing Norwalk in the May 1673 session.

Nathaniel Richards (1604–1681) was a founding settler of Hartford and Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Court of the Connecticut Colony from Norwalk in October 1658.

Richard Olmsted is an American artist living in Bellingham, Washington. Raised in Mount Vernon, Washington, Olmsted is best known for his pencil drawings. Olmsted has had showings at Thinkspace Gallery in Los Angeles, Mutiny Tattoo in Bellingham, The Wayward Cafe in Seattle, WA, and the "B" Gallery at Western Washington University.

Marsh sold his lot to Ephraim Lockwood in 1664. [7]

He is listed on the Founders Stone bearing the names of the founding settlers of Norwalk in the East Norwalk Historical Cemetery.

History of Norwalk, Connecticut

The history of Norwalk, Connecticut ranges from pre-contact cultures and Native Americans to the 21st century.

East Norwalk Historical Cemetery

Established in 1655, the East Norwalk Historical Cemetery is Norwalk's oldest cemetery, and many of the area's first settlers are buried there. The cemetery is owned and maintained by the Third Taxing District, formally known as the East Norwalk Fire District of the Town of Norwalk, and before that it was known as the Down Town School District. Triangle shaped and surrounded clockwise by Gregory Boulevard, Cemetery Street and East Avenue it is situated in the neighborhood of East Norwalk 41°6′9.22″N73°24′11.95″W.

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